2020 Toyota Supra

 

Toyota Vehicles Through the Years

Lexus Logo  Toyota Logo

A Pictorial Glimpse Toyota Vehicles Through the Years

Toyota began in 1933 when the organization became a division of Toyoda Automatic Loom Works committed to the generation of autos under the direction of the son of the founder, Kiichiro Toyoda. In 1929, Kiichiro Toyoda traveled to Europe and the U.S to study vehicle production and had started researching gas powered engines in 1930. Toyoda Automatic Loom Works was urged to develop automobiles by the Japanese government, which was in need of domestic vehicle production, because of the war with China. In 1934, the division delivered its first Type A Engine, which was utilized as a part of the initial Model A1 passenger vehicle in May 1935 and in the G1 in August 1935. Model AA passenger car production began in 1936. Early vehicles had a strong resemblance to the both Dodge Power Wagon and Chevrolet, with a few parts interchangeable with their American originals.

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In spite of the fact that the Toyota Group is primarily known today for its automobiles, it is still active in the textile business and continues to makes automatic looms, which have now been computerized, and electric sewing machines which are sold, around the world.

A separate sales organization in 1950, Toyota Motor Sales Co., (which continued until July 1982). The Toyopet dealer chain was set up in 1956. By 1957, the Crown was the first Japanese auto to be exported to the U.S. and also established was Toyota Motor Sales Inc., Toyota's American and Brazilian divisions. what's more, Toyota do Brasil S.A., was additionally established.

Toyota began expanding in the 1960s with new research and development facility, a Thailand presence was established, the 10 millionth model was created, a Deming Prize, and organizations with Hino Motors and Daihatsu were additionally established. In April, 1963 the first Toyota produced outside Japan, at Melbourne, Australia From 1963 until 1965, Australia was Toyota's greatest export market. By the end of the decade, Toyota had become a worldwide presence, as the organization had exported its one-millionth vehicle.

The first Japanese vehicles to reach North America were five Land Cruisers exported to El Salvador in May 1953.

The first Toyotas exported to Europe were a pair of Toyopet Tiaras delivered to Finland for assessment in June 1962, however no sales followed. The initial importer in Europe was Erla Auto Import A/S of Denmark, who received 190 Crowns taking after a May 1963 deal to be the distributor in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The Netherlands soon followed in May 1964, and subsequent to having built up footholds in nations with practically no indigenous car creation other markets followed in 1966. In 1968 Toyota set up its first European CKD assembling agent, Salvador Caetano I.M.V.T. of Portugal.

Toyota 1930s/1940s

Toyota Model AA (1936-1943)

1936 Toyota Model AA
1936 Toyota Model AA
1937 Toyota Model AA
1937 Toyota Model AA
The AA was a fully enclosed 4-door sedan that largely copied the design of the Chrysler built DeSoto Airflow. It had a metal body on a metal ladder chassis. The metal body was of modern construction compared to the fabric-over-wooden-frame bodies used on cars designed in the 1920s. The rear doors opened backwards as suicide doors. The front glass spanned the entire width of the body in a single pane. Toyota wanted to use an AA for its 50th birthday in 1987 but couldn't find any surviving examples. Toyota decided to build a replica but even for that there were no complete and consistent plans. Plans that could be found were from various points during the car's development process and in any case were often incomplete and lacking by today's standards. However, a single replica was built that is believed to be representative of the AA. This replica is now in the Toyota Automobile Museum.

Toyota Model AB (1936-1943)

1936 Toyota Model AB Phaeton
1936 Toyota Model AB Phaeton
The AB was identical to the AA except that it was a convertible with a folding cloth roof, the rear doors opened forwards like conventional doors and the front glass could fold down onto the engine compartment.

Toyota Model AC (1943–1944, 1947-1948)

1943 Toyota Model AC
1943 Toyota Model AC
The AC was similar to the AA, with only minor alternations to the body. The front glass was now a split into left and right halves with thick metal body work between them. Dates and production figures Design work began in 1938. A total of 115 AC sedans was produced from 1943 until the model was replaced by the Toyota SA during 1947–1948. Forty-three were produced in 1943, 19 in 1944 (until February), and 50 units were made from spares in 1947 for a military order, with a final three being built in 1948. No Toyota passenger car production occurred in the years 1945 and 1946, although what would become the first post-war car, the SA, was in development during these years.

Toyota Model SA (1947–1952)

1943 Toyopet Model SA
1943 Toyopet Model SA
1951 Toyopet Model SA
1951 Toyopet Model SA
The SA was Toyota's first new passenger car design (as opposed to updating the AA) after World War II. It was the first in a family of vehicles before the introduction of the Crown. A series of light trucks also shared the chassis and major components of these passenger cars. The SA was Toyota's first true post war design. It differed from all previous Toyota cars by having a 4-cylinder engine (previously a 6-cylinder was used), 4-wheel independent suspension (previously using rigid axles with leaf springs) and a smaller, "ponton" influenced aerodynamic body. The project was driven by Kiichiro Toyoda under the wisdom of his father's (Sakichi Toyoda) words, "Stay ahead of the times" but most of the design work was done by Dr Kazuo Kumabe. All of these vehicles were sold under the Toyopet name.

From September 1947, Toyota's small-sized vehicles were sold under the name "Toyopet" The first vehicle sold under this name was the Toyopet SA, but it also included vehicles such as the Toyopet SB light truck, Toyopet Stout light truck, Toyopet Crown, Toyopet Master, and the Toyopet Corona. The word "Toyopet" was a nickname given to the Toyota SA due to its small size, as the result of a naming contest the Toyota Company organized in 1947. However, when Toyota eventually entered the American market in 1957 with the Crown, the name was not well received due to connotations of toys and pets. The name was soon dropped for the American market, but continued in other markets until the mid-1960s.

Toyota Full Size

Toyota Crown First RS S30 (1955–1962)

1955 Toyopet Crown
1955 Toyopet Crown
1958 Toyopet Crown
1958 Toyopet Crown
The Toyota Crown has been produced by Toyota since 1955. It is currently a line of mid/full-size luxury sedans primarily aimed at the Japanese market and sold in other select Asian markets. Introduced in 1955, it has served as the mainstream sedan from Toyota in the Japanese market throughout its existence and holds the distinction of being the longest-running passenger-car nameplate affixed to any Toyota model, along with being the first Toyota vehicle to be exported to the United States in 1958.

Toyota Crown Second S40 (1962–1967)

1962 Toyota Crown
1962 Toyota Crown
Due to the introduction of the Corona, the dramatically restyled and enlarged Series S40 was launched in 1962, and saw the introduction of the Custom model. The styling was said to be influenced by the recently introduced Ford Falcon in 1960. The front grille approach has a similar appearance to the 1960 Imperial Crown (Chrysler), which speaks to Toyota's aspirations that the Crown be a large, comfortable sedan. The station wagon body style carried over from the previous generation Masterline, but with more attention to the luxurious approach used on the Crown.

Toyota Crown Third S50 (1967–1971)

1971 Toyota Crown
1971 Toyota Crown
Available in 1967, the mechanicals were much the same as the previous generation, but additional equipment was included. Higher specification models used the 2.0-liter M engine or the 2.3-liter 2M engine. A premium level Super Saloon joined the Super Deluxe model, and was available with the 2M engine including twin carburetors, electric windows, rear seat radio controls, air conditioning and luxury fabric on the seating including the crown logo embossed into the vinyl. Lower specified models were equipped with the R-series four-cylinder engines

Toyota Crown Fourth S60 S70 (1971–1974)

1971 Toyota Crown
1971 Toyota Crown
Launched in Feb 1971, the 4M 2600 engine was introduced with this generation, as was the luxurious Super Saloon trim level, followed by the Super Deluxe and Deluxe. The top of the line Royal Saloon was first introduced in the face-lifted Crown from 1973, adding luxury features from the Century limousine. The 2.0-liter 5R inline-four engine and the 2.0-liter M six-cylinder engine were also available. As for the previous generation, the M-C engine (in Japanese specifications) has 104 bhp, while the 5R's output increased somewhat to 97 bhp). In some markets the previous 2.3 litre "2M" six remained available, in sedan or "utility wagon" forms

Toyota Crown Fifth S80 S90 S100 (1974–1979)

1974 Toyota Crown
1974 Toyota Crown
Available in 1974 in Japan, export began from 1975. It was offered as four-door sedan, two-door hardtop coupe, four-door hardtop sedan, wagon, and van. Engines are 2.0- and 2.6-liter gasoline. The 2.2-liter diesel was introduced in October 1977. Trim levels are Standard, Deluxe, Super Saloon, and Royal Saloon.

Toyota Crown Sixth S110 (1979–1983

1979 Toyota Crown
1979 Toyota Crown
Launched in 1979, this model had the engine upgraded from the 2.6 L to 2.8 L 5M-EU model. The 2-liter M was still on offer along with a turbocharged version—the M-TEU. The carbureted 5M engine was also available in certain markets. In this series the model designation referred to the engine size — MS110 (2-liter), MS111 (2.6-liter), MS112 (2.8-liter). This was the last generation to install a four-cylinder, gasoline-powered engine. This model was the first generation Crown to be sold in Germany, beginning in 1980. The fuel injected 2.8 developed 145 PS (107 kW) in European trim, while the 2.2 diesel offered 66 PS (49 kW) and a choice of five-speed manual or an automatic (not in the Station Wagon). European sales started out at a respectable level, but with prices increasing at an alarming rate due to the appreciation of the yen, sales had dropped drastically by 1982.

Toyota Crown Seventh S120 (1983–1987)

1983 Toyota Crown
1983 Toyota Crown
Announced in 1983, this model used all three versions of the 5M 2.8L engine, the 5M carbureted version, 5M-E single overhead cam (SOHC) multi-point fuel-injected version, 5M-GE double overhead cam (DOHC), 1G-GE 2.0L DOHC, M-TE 2.0L single overhead cam (SOHC) Turbo, M-E 2.0L SOHC, 2L-TE 2.4L SOHC Turbo Diesel Ceramics Power or 2.4L SOHC Diesel Ceramics Power engines. All 2.0 L engines were installed with T-VIS (Toyota Variable Induction System). In September 1985, a supercharged version of the 2-liter G-series six replaced the turbocharged M-series.

Toyota Crown Eighth S130 (1987–1995)

1990 Toyota Crown
1990 Toyota Crown
Launched in 1987. Body style: Sedan, Hardtop, and Wagon, included the commercial Van. This model used 7M-GE 3000 cc DOHC, 1G-GZE 2000 cc DOHC Super Charger, 1G-GE 2000 cc DOHC, 1G-E 2000 cc, 2L-THE 2400 cc SOHC Turbo Diesel Hi Power (automatics), 2L-TE 2400 cc SOHC Turbo Diesel (with manual transmission) or 2L 2400 cc SOHC Diesel engines. The 4.0-liter 1UZ-FE, the same engine as in Lexus LS400, was available in the Royal Saloon G, which became the Toyota Crown Majesta with the next model revision in 1992.

Toyota Crown Ninth S140 (1991–1995)

1991 Toyota Crown
1991 Toyota Crown
The Crown Hardtop and all-new Crown Majesta models received the S140 chassis designation. The rebodied Crown Sedan and Wagon still carried S130 model codes, although the exterior is rounder, and the nose is similar to S140 Hardtop. Styling was largely influenced by the newly created Lexus LS, which was later sold in Japan as the Toyota Celsior at Toyopet Store locations, while the Crown and Crown Majesta remained exclusive to Toyota Store locations. One key difference between the Crown and the Crown Majesta was the former being built on a ladder frame construction and the latter a unit-body design, which was also shared with the Toyota Aristo, which was exclusive to Toyota Vista Store locations.

Toyota Crown Tenth S150 (1995–2001)

1995 Toyota Crown
1995 Toyota Crown
The 150-series Crown were built as Sedan and Hardtop (frameless door window) only. This was the first Crown to not use separate chassis construction. The Wagon retained the old 130 series model until 1999. Trim levels for Hardtop are Royal Extra, Royal Saloon, Royal Saloon G, and the sporty Royal Touring. 4WD is offered for Royal Extra and Royal Saloon. Engine is either 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0-liter 6-cylinder. As with previous generations, all vehicles with the 2.0 L engine were offered in a slightly shorter and narrower vehicle so as to be in compliance with Japanese Government dimension regulations.

Toyota Crown Eleventh S170 (1999–2003)

1999 Toyota Crown
1999 Toyota Crown
The 170-series, launched in September 1999, features shorter front overhang therefore maximizing interior and trunk space. There are two different 170-series 4-door Saloon; the Royal, and Athlete. The Majesta, while sharing the same S170 chassis, is a separate vehicle which is larger and longer than the Crown and has distinctive front and rear styling. The four-door Hardtop was discontinued. The 170-series Estate launched in December 1999 was the first new Crown Wagon after the 130-series and continued in production until the 2007 model year.

Toyota Crown Twelfth S180 (2003–2008)

2003 Toyota Crown
2003 Toyota Crown
The S180 model of the Crown, released in late 2003, was based on the Zero Crown concept car. The engine was changed to a V6 for the new Royal and Athlete models, while the Crown Majesta used the V8 only, now in 4.3-liter form with 4WD optional. The new engines gave more performance while also giving better fuel economy. Radar Pre-Collision System added a single digital camera to improve the accuracy of collision forecast and warning and control levels. In television commercials in Japan a song was written by composer John Harle titled "How should I my true love know?". G-BOOK was introduced in May 2006.

Toyota Crown Thirteenth S200 (2008–2012)

2008 Toyota Crown
2008 Toyota Crown
This generation of the Crown is available in 4 different trim levels: the Crown Royal series which is a more comfortable and luxurious car; the Crown Athlete series which takes the luxurious aspect of the Royal series but has more aggressive styling and sporty features; the Crown Majesta series with different styling and more luxurious features than the Royal series; and the Crown Hybrid series which is a trim level designated for the Hybrid Synergy Drive V6 drivetrain. The larger 4.6 L 1UR-FSE V8 engine incurs a higher road tax liability.

Toyota Crown Fourteenth S210 (2012–2018)

2012 Toyota Crown
2012 Toyota Crown
The fourteenth generation Crown was launched on 25 December 2012 with new styling, with the Royal series front styling theme paying homage to the fifth generation MS105 series. Most aspects of the car can be controlled by Toyota Multi-Operation Touch panel.

Toyota Crown Fifteenth S220 (2018–present)

2019 Toyota Crown
2019 Toyota Crown
The fifteenth generation Crown is one of the first Toyota models to be equipped with a DCM (Data Communication Module) system which then links with a Vehicle Control Network. By using this hardware, Toyota can provide various connected services to T-Connect subscribers through its proprietary Mobility Service Platform (MSPF), an information infrastructure developed by the company for Connected Cars. Moving forward, Toyota aims to equip most new passenger vehicles in its domestic market with DCM.

Toyota Avalon (1994-present)

1995 Toyoto Avalon
1995 Toyoto Avalon
2016 Toyoto Avalon
2016 Toyoto Avalon
2019 Toyoto Avalon
2019 Toyoto Avalon
The Toyota Avalon is a full-size car produced by Toyota in the United States and Canada is Toyota's largest front-wheel-drive sedan in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and the Middle East. It was also produced in Australia from April 2000 until June 2005, when it was replaced in November 2006 by the Toyota Aurion. The first production Avalon rolled off the TMMK assembly line in Georgetown, Kentucky, in September 1994. A second-generation model was released in the United States and Japan in 1999.

Toyota Mid Size

Toyota Cressida (1973–1992)

1990 Toyota Cressida
1990 Toyota Cressida
The Toyota Cressida is a mid-size car manufactured by Toyota from December 1976 until 1992 through four generations. Cressida was the export version of the Mark II sold in Japan. The "Cressida" nameplate derives from the Trojan character.

Toyota Cresta (1980–2001)

1981 Toyota Cresta
1981 Toyota Cresta
The Toyota Cresta is a mid-size car built by Toyota. It was launched in 1980 and shared the chassis with the Mark II/Cressida, sold at Toyopet Store dealerships in Japan. The goal of the Cresta was a higher level of luxury in comparison to the Mark II, while the Chaser was the performance-oriented version of the Mark II, but sold at different dealerships. Often available with two-tone paint and more interior convenience options, with the result ending up being more similar to the Cressida sold in export markets. The Cresta was produced for five generations, and production eventually ceased in 2001, when it was merged with the Chaser to form the short lived Verossa.

Toyota Camry V10 first generation (1982–1986)

1982 Toyoto Camry
1982 Toyoto Camry
1986 Toyoto Camry
1986 Toyoto Camry
The Toyota Camry has been sold internationally since 1982, spanning multiple generations. Originally compact in size (narrow-body), later Camry models have grown to fit the mid-size classification (wide-body)—although the two sizes co-existed in the 1990s. Since the release of the wide-bodied versions, Camry has been extolled by Toyota as the firm's second "world car" after the Corolla. In Japan, Camry is exclusive to Toyota Corolla Store retail dealerships.

Toyota Camry V20 second generation (1986–1992)

1987 Toyoto Camry
1987 Toyoto Camry
1992 Toyoto Camry
1992 Toyoto Camry
The V20 Camry originated from a time at Toyota when considerable cost and attention to detail was engineered into its cars such as high-quality materials and build quality to transcend the competition. Sedans retained the V10's rear quarter glass with styling less angular than before. To appease export customers, styling lost some of its Japanese legacy in its transition to a more Americanized design, with a softer and sleeker silhouette

Toyota Camry XV10 third generation (1991–1996)

1994 Toyoto Camry LE
1994 Toyoto Camry LE
1996 Toyoto Camry
1996 Toyoto Camry
Toyota replaced the compact V20 Camry with the Japanese market-only V30 series in 1990. However, international markets such as Australia and North America received a widened version of the V30, known as the XV10 series. While marginally larger than the V20, the V30 had to comply with Japanese dimension regulations, which restricted the car's width to 67 inches and length to 190 inches for a lower tax obligation. Particularly in the United States, this narrower model was seen as compromised, thus limiting its sales potential. As a result, the "wide-body" mid-size Camry (XV10) released to North America in 1991 was developed from early 1988 and the final design frozen later that year. It was with the XV10 that Toyota upgraded the Camry's status to its second "world car" after the Corolla, with exports starting from Australia to Southeast Asia

Toyota Camry XV20 fourth generation (1996–2001)

1998 Toyoto Camry LE
1998 Toyoto Camry LE
2001 Toyoto Camry LE
2001 Toyoto Camry LE
In the United States, the Camry SE was dropped and the base model was renamed the CE for the 1997 model year. Both the LE and the XLE trims were carried over from the previous series. All trim levels were available with either the 2.2-liter I4 or the 3.0-liter V6 engine except the Solara SLE, which was only available with the V6. TRD offered a supercharger kit for 1997 through to 2000 V6 models raising power to 247 hp (184 kW) and 242 lb⋅ft (328 N⋅m) of torque.

Toyota Camry XV30 fifth generation (2002–2006)

2003 Toyoto Camry
2003 Toyoto Camry
2006 Toyoto Camry
2006 Toyoto Camry
Released in September 2001 for the 2002 model year, Toyota released the Camry XV30 series as a larger sedan, but without a station wagon for the first time. The wagon's demise occurred due to its sales erosion to minivans and crossover SUVs. Toyota redesigned this series from the ground up for the first time since the V30 and XV10. Through efficiency gains such as increased computerization, and by having the XV30 ride on the K platform introduced with the Toyota Highlander (XU20) of 2000, Toyota expedited the XV30 production development stage to 26 months, down from 36 months with the XV20. As a consequence,

Toyota Camry XV40 sixth generation (2006-2011)

2009 Toyoto Camry LE
2009 Toyoto Camry LE
2010 Toyoto Camry LE
2010 Toyoto Camry LE
The XV40 Camry was introduced at the 2006 North American International Auto Show alongside a hybrid version and went on sale in March 2006 for the 2007 model year. This generation of Camry saw even greater differentiation between "regular" model sold internationally (including Japan) and the "prestige" Camry sold in the rest of Asia. The regular Camry, fitted with four-cylinder engines sold alongside the V6-engined prestige Camry in Oceania and the Middle East as the Toyota Aurion. Between 2006 and 2010, the regular Camry was also rebadged as the Daihatsu Altis model, which sold alongside the Camry in Japan. The Daihatsu differed only in badging, with no cosmetic changes.

Toyota Camry XV50 seventh generation (2011-2017)

2011 Toyoto Camry LE
2011 Toyoto Camry LE
2016 Toyoto Camry
2016 Toyoto Camry
The XV50 Camry began U.S. sales in September 2011. The interior received a major restyling, while the exterior received all-new sheet metal and more angular styling. The US Camry carried over three different engine choices from the previous model. Starting with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder hybrid model rated at 149 kW (200 hp), a 2.5-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine rated at 133 kW (178 hp) and 230 N⋅m (170 lb⋅ft), and a 3.5-liter V6 rated at 200 kW (268 hp) and 336 N⋅m (248 lb⋅ft). Power output has been increased mostly by switching to electro-hydraulic power steering. The trim levels include the L, LE, SE, XLE, SE V6, XLE V6, Hybrid LE, Hybrid XLE and for 2014 a Hybrid SE model

Toyota Camry XV70 eighth generation (2017-present)

2017 Toyoto Camry XLE
2017 Toyoto Camry XLE
2018 Toyoto Camry
2018 Toyoto Camry
2019 Toyoto Camry XSE
2019 Toyoto Camry XSE
The latest Camry, which is the eighth-generation of the global Camry model, and known as the XV70 was introduced at the January 2017 North American International Auto Show. It was launched in Japan on July 10, 2017 and in Australia on November 21, 2017. North American production started in June 2017, and sales began in late July 2017. Due to the need to equip Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky with new equipment for Toyota New Global Architecture, a small portion of the initial North American production was sourced from the Tsutsumi plant in Japan.

Toyota Compact

Toyota Corolla (1966-present)

1966 Toyota Corolla
1966 Toyota Corolla
1999 Toyota Corolla
1999 Toyota Corolla
2019 Toyoto Corolla
2019 Toyota Corolla
The Toyota Corolla (E170) is the eleventh generation of the Corolla that has been sold internationally since 2013. Two basic front and rear styling treatments are fitted to the E170—a North American version that debuted first—and a more conservative design for all other markets that debuted later in 2013. For the Japanese and Hong Kong markets, the smaller and unrelated Corolla (E160) is offered instead.

Toyota Corona (1957-2002)

1957 Toyota Corona
1957 Toyota Corona
1980 Toyota Corona RT132 Liftback
1980 Toyota Corona RT132 Liftback
2001 Toyota Corona
2001 Toyota Corona
The Toyota Corona was manufactured by between 1957 and 2002. Traditionally, the competitor from Nissan was the Nissan Bluebird. The word "corona" is Latin for "crown", a reference to an earlier vehicle Toyota offered called the Toyota Crown. It was exclusive to Toyopet Store dealership channels in Japan, while the larger Crown was available only at Toyota Store locations. In many countries, the Corona was one of Toyota's first international exports, and was shortly joined by the smaller Toyota Corolla, providing buyers with a choice of a larger car, with similar operating expenses to the smaller Corolla.

Toyota AE86 Sprinter (1984-1998)

1995 Toyota Sprinter
1995 Toyota Sprinter
The AE86 series of the Toyota Corolla Levin and Toyota Sprinter Trueno are small, front-engine/rear-drive models within the fifth generation Corolla range — marketed by Toyota from 1983 to 1987 in coupe and hatchback configurations. Lending themselves to racing, the cars were light, affordable, easily modifiable and combined a five-speed manual transmission, optional limited slip differential, MacPherson strut front suspension, high revving (7800 rpm), twin-cam engine with oil cooler (e.g., in the US), near 50/50 front/rear weight balance, and importantly, a front-engine/rear-drive layout — at a time when this configuration was waning industry-wide.

Toyota Hybrid Electric

Toyota Prius (1997-present)

1997 Toyoto Prius Hybrid
1997 Toyoto Prius Hybrid
2011 Toyoto Prius Hybrid
2011 Toyoto Prius Hybrid
2019 Toyoto Prius Hybrid
2019 Toyoto Prius Hybrid
The Toyota Prius is a full hybrid electric automobile developed by Toyota and manufactured by the company since 1997. Initially offered as a 4-door sedan, it has been produced only as a 5-door liftback since 2003. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California Air Resources Board (CARB) rate the Prius as among the cleanest vehicles sold in the United States, based on smog-forming emissions. The 2018 model year Prius Eco ranks as the second most fuel efficient gasoline-powered car available in the US without plug-in capability, following the Hyundai Ioniq "Blue

Toyota Sports Cars

Toyota 2000 GT (1967-1970)

1967 Toyota 2000 GT
1967 Toyota 2000 GT
The Toyota 2000GT is a limited-production, front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, two-seat, hardtop coupé grand tourer designed by Toyota in collaboration with Yamaha. First displayed to the public at the Tokyo Motor Show in 1965, the 2000GT was manufactured under contract by Yamaha between 1967 and 1970. In Japan, it was exclusive to Toyota's Japanese retail sales channel called Toyota Store. The 2000GT revolutionized the automotive world's view of Japan, then viewed as a producer of imitative and stodgily practical vehicles. As a sleek, high-performance fastback, it demonstrated its auto makers could produce a sports car to rival the better marques of Europe. Reviewing a pre-production 2000GT in 1967, Road & Track magazine summed up the car as "one of the most exciting and enjoyable cars we've driven", and compared it favorably to the Porsche 911. Today, the 2000GT is seen as the first seriously collectible Japanese car and its first supercar. Examples of the 2000GT have sold at auction for as much as US$1,200,000.

Toyota Celica(1971-2006)

1974 Toyota Celica
1974 Toyota Celica
1990 Toyota Celica
1990 Toyota Celica
The Toyota Celica was produced by Toyota from 1970 to 2006. The Celica name derives from the Latin word coelica meaning "heavenly" or "celestial". In Japan, the Celica was exclusive to Toyota Japanese dealerships Toyota Corolla Store. Throughout its life span the Celica has been powered by various four-cylinder engines. The most significant change occurred in August 1985, when the car's drive layout was changed from rear-wheel drive to front-wheel drive. During the first three generations, American market Celicas were powered by various versions of Toyota's R series engines.

Toyota Supra (1978-2002)

1979 Toyota Supra
1979 Toyota Supra
The Toyota Supra is a sports car and grand tourer manufactured by Toyota Motor Corporation beginning in 1978. The initial four generations of the Supra were produced from 1978 to 2002. As of March 2019, the fifth generation is being produced, but not sold to the public yet. The styling of the Supra was derived from the Toyota Celica, but it was both longer and wider. Starting in mid-1986, the A70 Supra became a separate model from the Celica. In turn, Toyota also stopped using the prefix Celica and began calling the car Supra. Owing to the similarity and past of the Celica's name, it is frequently mistaken for the Supra, and vice versa. The first, second, and third generations of the Supra were assembled at the Tahara plant in Tahara, Aichi while the fourth generation was assembled at the Motomachi plant in Toyota City. The fifth generation Supra is assembled in Graz, Austria by Magna Steyr. The Supra also traces much of its roots back to the 2000GT owing to an inline-6 layout. The first three generations were offered with a direct descendant to the Crown's and 2000GT's M engine. Interior aspects were also similar, as was the chassis code "A".

Toyota Supra A90 (2019-present)

2019 Toyota Supra
2019 Toyota Supra
2020 Toyota Supra
2020 Toyota Supra
The fifth generation of the Supra made its debut at the January 2019 North American International Auto Show as a 2020 model. The car is a collaboration between Toyota and BMW, as a result is based on the Z4. But the car drives and handles very differently from it's brother Z4. Only the chassis and engine are the same, after the development of that with BMW, Toyota began working on the Supra by themselves with no influence from BMW. The engine is also tuned differently as well as the suspension and many more. The first production model was auctioned at a price of US$2.1 million at Barrett-Jackson auction in January 2019, with 100% of the money going to the American Heart Association and the Bob Woodruff Foundation. The auction car has a one-off matte grey exterior color which is not offered on the standard Supra, as well as a red interior, metallic black 5-bolt wheels, red wing mirrors, a signature from Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda on the dashboard and VIN number 20201. Sales for the production car will begin sometime around the second quarter of 2019 with an expected price tag of US$50,920 in the United States.

Toyota 86 (2012-present)

2012 Toyota 86 GTS
2012 Toyota 86 GTS
2019 Toyota 86 TRD
2019 Toyota 86 TRD
The Toyota 86 is a 2+2 sports car jointly developed by Toyota and Subaru, manufactured at Subaru's Gunma assembly plant — along with a badge engineered variant, marketed as the Subaru BRZ. The 2+2 fastback coupé is noted for its naturally-aspirated boxer engine, front-engined, rear-wheel-drive configuration, 50/50 front/rear weight balance and low center of gravity — and for drawing inspiration from Toyota's earlier AE86, a small, light, front-engine/rear-drive Corolla variant widely popular for Showroom Stock, Group A, and Group N, Rally, Club and drift racing. Toyota markets the sports car as the 86 in Asia, Australia, North America (from August 2016), South Africa, and South America; as the Toyota GT86 in Europe; as the 86 and GT86 in New Zealand; as the Toyota FT86 in Nicaragua and Jamaica and as the Scion FR-S (2012-2016) in the United States and Canada.

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    Toyota Vehicles Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5