2019 Renault Captur

 

Renault Motor Cars Through the Years

Groupe Renault, a French multinational car producer was founded in 1899. The organization creates an array of autos and vans, and in the past has fabricated trucks, tractors, tanks, transports/mentors and autorail vehicles.

Renault owns a 43.4% controlling interest in Nissan of Japan, a 37% interest in a in AvtoVAZ of Russia, and a 1.55% interest in Daimler AG of Germany (since 2012, Renault produces engines for Daimler's Mercedes A Class and B Class vehicles.

Renault Videos

Creating autos since late 1897, the Renault company was established as Société Renault Frères by Louis Renault and s Marcel and Fernand Renault, his brothers, in 1899. Louis was a brilliant, young engineer who had previously designed and constructed a several models before collaborating with his brothers, who had sharpened their business skills while working for their dad's textile company. While Louis took care of design and production, Marcel and Fernand took care of the management.

Antique Renaults

Renault Voiturette (1898–1903)

Renault 1 CV
Renault 1 CV
The first Renault automobile, the Renault Voiturette 1CV was sold to one of of Louis' dad's friend after a test ride on December 24, 1898. The customer was so impressed with the way the small auto ran and how it climbed the boulevards that he purchased it.

(Type A/Type B/Type C/Type D/Type E/Type G/Type H/Type J)
1902 Renault Voiturette
1902 Renault Voiturette
The Renault Voiturette (Renault Little Car) was Renault's first ever produced automobile, and was manufactured between 1898 and 1903. The name was used for five models. The first Voiturettes mounted De Dion-Bouton engines. Continental tires were used for the car, a make still used for several modern Renaults today.

Renault Taxi de la Marne (1905–1910)

(Type AG/Type AG-1)
Renault Taxi de la Marne
1905 Renault Taxi de la Marne
The Renault Taxi de la Marne (Marne Taxi) is an automobile manufactured between 1905 and 1910 by Renault and used as a taxicab. The name Taxi de la Marne was not used until the outbreak of World War I, when the fleet of Paris taxis was requisitioned by the French Army to transport troops from Paris to the First Battle of the Marne in early September 1914.

Renault Type Y (1905–1906)

1905 Renault Type Y-A bicylindre 10 HP Double Phaéton roi-des-belges
1905 Renault Type Y-A bicylindre 10 HP Double Phaéton roi-des-belges
The Renault Type Y was an automobile produced between 1905 and 1906 by Renault. It is believed that the mechanical structure and design came out as an evolution to that of the Renault Voiturette as is very similar to the Type C, D and E Voiturettes.

Renault Grand Prix (1906–1908)

1906 Renault AK9O CV Grand Prix
1906 Renault AK9O CV Grand Prix
The Renault Grand Prix was a race car manufactured between 1906 and 1908 by French car maker Renault. It was also known as Renault Grand Prix de l'A.C.F. (Renault Grand Prix of the Automobile Club de France). The A.C.F. Grand Prix was created in 1906, where Renault and the other racing leaders like Mercedes-Benz started racing again after the 1903 tragedy where Marcel Renault and nine other people lost their lives.

Renault AX (1908–1914)

1908 Renault Type AX Tourer
1908 Renault Type AX Tourer
The Renault AX was an automobile manufactured by Renault. It was produced between 1908 and 1914 and was mostly used by cab drivers. The AX had a 2-cylinders straight engine with a displacement of 1,060 cc and a power of 8 kW. Its maximum speed was 34 mph (55 km/h). The vehicle weighed 750 kg.

Renault 40CV (1911–1928)

1926 Renault Montlherey Coupe
1926 Renault 40CV Coupe
The Renault 40CV was a large car produced by the French vehicle manufacturer Renault from 1911 to 1928. It was sold in many variations which were known by two letter names such as the CG, ES and JP. Originally launched with a 6-cylinder 7.5-litre engine (460 cu in)), this was replaced by a larger 9.1-litre (557 cu in) engine when the "Type HF" version of the 40CV replaced the "Type HD" version in August 1920. In 1922 the 40CV was fitted with a hydraulic servo-brake system. The 40 CV was replaced by the Renault Reinastella in 1928. A 40CV won the Monte Carlo Rally in 1925, and a modified single-seater NM became well known in 1926 for being able to cover 50 miles (80.5 km) at a speed of 190 km/h (118.1 mph) and broke the 24-hour record by covering 4167.57 km at an average speed of 173.6 km/h (107.9 mph). Between 1920 and 1928 the Renault 40CV served as official transport for the French president, usurping a role previously filled by the Panhard 20CV.

Renault Towncar (1912-1933)

1912 Renault Type CB Towncar
1912 Renault Type CB Towncar
The Renault type CB Town Car is an automobile manufactured between 1912 and 1933 by Renault. In 1912, William Carter bought one and was planning to transport it from Southampton, England to New York City on the RMS Titanic. Carter was saved but the car sunk in the Atlantic. A replica was requested by James Cameron and 20th Century Fox for their motion picture Titanic. They looked for Carter's original documents for the vehicle and the car was recreated almost exactly.

Renault - 1920s & 1930s

Renault GS (1920)

1921 Renault GS
1921 Renault GS
The Renault GS was a Mid-size car manufactured by Renault from 1920 to 1925. The GS and the similar Renault IG were cars in the 10CV class presented at the Mondial de l'Automobile in Paris in 1919 to replace the Type EF. Production started In 1920. In 1922, a new, larger version named the Type II appeared. This version was only produced until 1923. In 1925 the Renault GS and Renault IG were replaced by the Renault KZ

Renault KJ (1923-1924)

1924 Renault KJ
1924 Renault KJ
The Renault KJ was presented at the Mondial de l'Automobile in Paris in 1923, the project was created and designed by Louis Renault. A car of the medium social class, its competitors were the Peugeot Quadrilette and the Citroen Type C, the Renault KJ was available in a variety of body styles. After only a few months production the "Coal Scuttle" bonnet was replaced with the new style "Alligator" bonnet and the car was designated the KJ1

Renault KZ (1924–1932)

1924 Renault KZ
1924 Renault KZ
The Renault KZ was a mid-size car or large family car manufactured by Renault from 1923 to 1931. The KZ was the replacement of the Type GS and the Type IG and its intention was to be a rival of the Citroen Type C in the class called "populaires" (economic). The car had a 4-cylinder engine of 2120 cc, 33 cm larger than its predecessors. In 1927 three new models arrived, the KZ1, KZ2, KZ3, 21 cm larger. In 1929 and 1931 the KZ4 and KZ5 were introduced.

Renault MT (1923-1925)

1923 Renault Torpedo Type MT
1923 Renault Torpedo Type MT
The Renault MT was a compact sport automobile manufactured by Renault from 1923 to 1925. The Renault MT was presented in the 1923 Mondial de l'Automobile in Paris. The project was created and designed by Labourdette and Louis Renault together with the Renault KJ, as a middle-class car with an alternative style for 3 passengers. It was produced in Skiff or boat tail bodystyles. The Renault MT's front was very similar to the Renault KJ. Production ceased in 1924 as Renault replaced this model with the Renault NN.

Renault NN/6CV (1924-1930)

1924 Renault NN
1924 Renault NN
Powered by a 4-cylinder 951cc engine, the NN was first presented at the 1924 Mondial de l'Automobile in Paris as the successor for Renault Type KJ and Type MT. It was in effect a lengthened version of the MT, with an extra 200 mm (7.9 in) of wheelbase, and the addition of front-wheel brakes. It ws also knows as the  Renault 6CV

Renault Monasix (1927-1932)

1927 Renault Monasix RY2 Berline
1927 Renault Monasix RY2 Berline
The Renault Monasix (Type RY) was a compact car or small family car manufactured between 1927 and 1932 by Renault. The car was considered a commercial failure mainly because the engine was too small for the car's length and weight, which often led to problems in keeping the car under control. Renault ended production of the car in 1932. With its 1,476 cc displacement, the engine was one of the smallest six cylinder engines available at the time.

Renault 24CV (Types PI, PZ) (1927-1928)

1927 Renault 24CV
1927 Renault 24CV
The Renault 24cv models PI and PZ were produced as 1927 and 1928 models only. The cars were made to distributor order and as sales were very low production was small. Both featured the new three spring rear suspension that provided much improved roadholding and handling. The 6-cylinder motor (85 x 140) was also uprated to 85 hp and a four-speed gearbox fitted. Other running gear, including the servo brakes were identical to the 40cv which had the 110 x 160 motor. This was the last model year of the 6-cylinder large cars. The PI were the open cars on short and long chassis. PZ were closed cars on long or very long chassis. All were available with two side-mounted spare wheels or the signature dual rear-mounted wheels to emphasize the long hood.

Renault Vivasix (1928–1930)

1928 Renault Vivasix
1928 Renault Vivasix
The Renault Vivasix was a full-size car manufactured by the French car company Renault between 1926 and 1930. In 1930 the Vivasix was replaced by the Vivastella. In 1927 Renault created two new models, one luxury and expensive called "Type RA" and a second, simpler model called "Type PG". The two models together were known as the Vivasix. The Vivasix model was one of the larger cars produced by Renault in that period. The "Type RA" and the "Type PG" were replaced by a new luxury car called the Renault Vivastella between 1928 and 1929. The top speed of the Vivasix was 81 mph.

Renault Monastella (1928-1933)

1928 Renault Monastella
1928 Renault Monastella
The Renault Monastella (Type RY1) was a compact luxury car manufactured between late 1928 and 1933 by Renault. It shared the mechanical elements and bodywork options of the Renault Monasix but was differentiated by superior levels of finish and equipment.

Renault Reinastella (Type RM2) (1929–1933)

1929 Renault Reinastella
1929 Renault Reinastella
The Renault Reinastella is an automobile created by Renault. The original Reinastella was a luxury-class car manufactured between 1929 and 1933. The car was unveiled at the 1928 Paris Motor Show as the Renault Renahuit. The original Reinastella was the first of Renault's Stella series, high-end luxury automobiles intended to compete with contemporary marques such as Hispano-Suiza, Rolls-Royce, Daimler, Lincoln, Packard, and Cadillac. The Stellas, or Grand Renaults, were marked with a star riveted to the radiator grille above the famous Renault lozenge.

Renault Vivastella (Type PG4) (1929-1939)

1930 Renault Vivastella
1930 Renault Vivastella
The Renault Vivastella was an executive car introduced by Renault in October 1928 and produced for the model years 1929 - 1939. The car was modified and changed with unusual frequency even by the standards of Renault in the 1930s, and following its evolution in retrospect is rendered more complicated by the way that the Renault catalogue frequently listed two succeeding generations of the model simultaneously, but the Vivastella always occupied a place in the manufacturer's line-up a little below the slightly longer Renault Reinastella.

Renault Nervastella (1930–1937)

1930 Renault Nervastella
1930 Renault Nervastella
The Nervastella is a large automobile constructed by Renault between 1930 and 1937. It was used as a state car and pictures of the President of the French Republic sitting in a Nervastella can therefore be seen in newsreels from the mid-1930s. The car was a smaller brother to the Renault Reinastella which had been launched a year earlier, but the Nervastella was technically more advanced, and with a 131.9 inch wheelbase it was still, by the standards of the time and place, large. In the early 1930s Renault introduced a number of models with names that ended in "-stella", which was a conscious reference to the Latin word for a "star"

Renault Primaquatre (Type KZ6) (1931–1941)

1931 Renault Primaquatre
1931 Renault Primaquatre
The Renault Primaquatre was an automobile produced from 1931 to 1941 by Renault, the last car built before Louis Renault's death in 1944. The Primaquatre was first exhibited in December of 1930 as the Type KZ6, being a development from to the KZ series. Its 4-cylinder engine was of 2120 cc providing a published maximum output of 35 horsepower (26 kW) at 2900 rpm. The claimed maximum speed was 62 mph. The rear wheels were driven via an unsynchronised 3-speed manual transmission.

Renault Primastella (Type PG8) (1932-1935)

1932 Renault Primastella
1932 Renault Primastella
The Renault Primastella (Type PG8) was a mid-size luxury car or executive car automobile manufactured between 1932 and 1935 by Renault. The Primastella was released in 1932 with a 6 cylinders 16CV engine, derived from that of the Renault Vivastella but with a slightly smaller cylinder bore. The Primastella "Type PG8" was produced until 1933.

Renault Monaquatre (1932–1936)

1932 Renault Monaquatre
1932 Renault Monaquatre
The Monaquatre (Type UY1) was a small family car assembled by Renault between 1931 and 1936. It used a conventional front-engine, rear-wheel-drive configuration and was powered by a four-cylinder water-cooled engine. In October 1933 the type YN2 appeared at the Paris Motor Show, featuring a redesigned hood, the angle of the radiator grill being now a little more raked. The YN2 was a transitional model, the manufacturer having already decided to fit "aérodynamique" bodies with fashionably sloping tails replacing the very vertical rear ends of the existing cars.

Renault Vivaquatre (1932–1939)

1933 Renault Vivaquatre
1933 Renault Vivaquatre
The Vivaquatre is a car produced by Renault between 1932 and 1939. Its large 4-cylinder engine placed it initially in the 10CV car tax class, though a larger engine later made it a contender in the 11CV class. The "G7" long wheelbase version of the car was offered for taxi work from April 1933, and Vivaquatre taxis continued to operate till the end of the 1950s.

Renault Vivasport (1933–1938)

1933 Renault Vivasport
1933 Renault Vivasport
The Renault Vivasport was a 6-cylinder engined executive automobile introduced by Renault in September 1933 and produced till April 1935. A larger engined version was produced between December 1934 and February 1938. As with many Renaults during the 1930s, type changes as well as small often cosmetic facelifts and upgrades appeared frequently.

Renault Celtaquatre (1934-1938)

1936 Renault Celtaquatre
1936 Renault Celtaquatre
The Renault Celtaquatre is a small family car produced by the French manufacturer Renault between 1934 and 1938. Although French, it took some of its styling cues from American cars of the time. Its rounded silhouette gave it the nickname “Celtaboule” ("Celtaball").

Renault Viva Grand Sport (1934–1939)

1936 Renault Viva Grand Sport
1936 Renault Viva Grand Sport
The Renault Viva Grand Sport (branded as the Renault Vivastella Grand Sport before August 1935) was introduced alongside an updated version of the Nervastella in October 1934 at the Paris Motor Show. The last cars were produced in August 1939: in anticipation of the 1940 model year a prototype of another updated Viva Grand Sport was produced during the summer of 1939, but in the event this single car was the only one of its type to be produced.

Renault Juvaquatre, Novaquate (1937-1960)

1938 Renault Novaquate
1938 Renault Novaquate
The Renault Juvaquatre is a small family car / compact car automobile produced by Renault between 1937 and 1960, although production stopped or slowed to a trickle during the war years. The Juvaquatre was produced as a sedan/saloon until 1948 when the plant switched its full attention to the new Renault 4CV. During the second half of 1952 the plant restarted production of the Juvaquatre sedans/saloons for a period of approximately five months.

Renault Suprastella (Type RM2) (1939)

1939 Renault Suprastella
1939 Renault Suprastella
The Renault Suprastella was a large car presented by Renault in the Spring of 1938 as a replacement for the Renault Nervastella from which it inherited its mechanical elements and many other essential characteristics. A new feature was a wrap-around front grill of horizontal bars: the new grill, regarded by some commentators as a move towards a more vulgar "look" would become a general feature across the Renault range during 1939

Renault 1940s & 1960s

Renault 4CV (1947-1961)

1955 Renault 4 CV001
1955 Renault 4 CV001
1960 Renault 4CV
1960 Renault 4CV
The Renault 4CV (French: quatre chevaux, is a rear-engined, rear-wheel-drive, 4-door economy supermini manufactured and marketed by the French manufacturer Renault from August 1947 through July 1961. It was the first French car to sell over a million units, and was superseded by the Dauphine.

Renault Frégate (1951-1960)

1959 Renault Frégate
1959 Renault Frégate
The Renault Frégate is an executive saloon car produced by the French automaker Renault between 1951 and 1960. Estate variants, the Renault Domaine and the Renault Manoir, were introduced in 1956 and 1958 respectively.

Renault Dauphine (1958-1967)

1958 Renault Dauphine
1958 Renault Dauphine
Renault Dauphine is a rear-engined economy car manufactured by Renault in a single body style – a three-box, 4-door saloon – as the successor to the Renault 4CV; more than two million were manufactured during its 1956-1967 production.

Renault Caravelle/Floride (1958-1968)

1958 Renault Floride
1958 Renault Floride
The Renault Caravelle is a sports car manufactured and marketed by Renault for model years 1958-1968 in a single generation — as a rear-engine, rear drive open two/four-seater designed by Pietro Frua of Carrozzeria Ghia, using the floorpan and engine of the Renault Dauphine. Outside of North America and Britain it was, until 1962, marketed under the nameplate Renault Floride.

Renault 3 (1961–1962)

1961 Renault 3
1961 Renault 3
Renault launched the Renault 3 and the Renault 4 simultaneously in July 1961. The cars shared the same body and most mechanical components, but the R3 was powered by a 603 cc version of the engine while the R4 featured a 747 cc engine. This placed the R3 in the 3CV taxation class while the R4 was in the 4CV class

Renault 4 (1961-1994)

1961 Renault 4 Pula
1961 Renault 4 Pula
The Renault 4, also known as the 4L (pronounced "Quatrelle"), is a hatchback economy car produced by the French automaker Renault between 1961 and 1994. It was the first front-wheel drive family car produced by Renault. The car was launched at a time when several decades of economic stagnation were giving way to growing prosperity and surging car ownership in France. The first million cars were produced by 1 February 1966, less than four and a half years after launch; eventually over eight million were built, making the Renault 4 a commercial success because of the timing of its introduction and the merits of its design. Although originally marketed as a small estate car, it is now regarded as the first mass production hatchback car.

Renault 8 and 10 (1962–1971)

1962 Renault 8
1962 Renault 8
The Renault 8 (Renault R8 until 1964) and Renault 10 are two rear-engined, rear-wheel drive small family cars produced by the French manufacturer Renault in the 1960s and early 1970s. The 8 was launched in 1962, and the 10, a more upmarket version of the 8, was launched in 1965. The Renault 8 ceased production and sales in France in 1973. By then the Renault 10 had already been replaced, two years earlier, by the front wheel drive Renault 12.

Renault 16 (1965–1979)

1965 Renault 16
1965 Renault 16
The Renault 16 (R16) is a family hatchback produced by French automaker Renault between 1965 and 1980 in Le Havre, France.

Renault 5 (1972–1996)

1976 Renault 5
1976 Renault 5
The Renault 5 is a four passenger, three or five-door, front-engine, front wheel drive hatchback supermini manufactured and marketed by Renault over two generations 1972–1985 (also called R5) and 1984–1996 (also called Super 5 or Supercinq).

Renault R5 (1972-1985)

1972 Renault R5
1972 Renault R5
The Renault 5 is a supermini that was manufactured in two generations 1972–1985 (additionally called R5) and 1984–1996 (likewise labeled Super 5 or Supercinq). The R5 was marketed in the United states as Le Car, from 1976 to 1983. About 5.5 million were built. The Renault 5 similar to the first Mini, achieved a cult status. The R5 spawned the Renault 7, a four door sedan variant manufactured marketed 1974–1984 in Spain by Renault's subsidiary, FASA-Renault. The Renault 5 became the best-selling car in France from 1972-1986, with a total production exceeding 5.5 m over a 14-year period, and making it France’s most popular car

Renault R6 (1968-1986)

1970 Renault R6
1970 Renault R6
The Renault 6 is a small family car produced by the French automaker Renault between 1968 and 1986. The Renault 6 (R6) was launched at the 1968 Paris Motor Show, and was intended to be an upmarket alternative to the Renault 4 that would compete with the Citroën Ami 6 and the recently launched Citroën Dyane. It used a similar dashboard-mounted gear-lever and over-the-engine linkage to that used in the Renault 4 and the small Citroëns with which it competed. The R6 used the R4 platform as well as its 845 cc engine and was technically near-identical, but its hatchback body was larger and more modern. Visually it resembled the larger Renault 16.

The organization's economical, compact Renault 5 model, released in January 1972, was a success, after anticipating the 1973 energy crisis. All through the 1970s the Renault R4, R5, R6, R12, R15, R16 and R17 kept up Renault's creation with new models which included the Renault 18 and Renault 20.

Amid the mid seventies, Renault diversified into more enterprises and grew internationally, including South East Asia. The energy crisis drove Renault to again enter the North American market. In spite of the Dauphine's success in the U.S. in the late 1950s and an unsuccessful assembly venture in Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Quebec, from 1964 to 1972, Renault started to vanish from North America toward the end of the 1970s.

Renault 12 (1969–1980)

1969 Renault 12
1969 Renault 12
The Renault 12 is a large family car introduced by French automaker Renault at the Paris Motor Show in October 1969 and produced in France till 1980. Available as a saloon (Berline) and estate (Break), it was also produced under licence in many countries around the globe into the early 21st century.

Renault 15 and 17 (1971–1977)

1971 Renault 15
1971 Renault 15
The Renault 15 and Renault 17 are two variations of the same coupé designed and built by French automaker Renault between July 1971 and August 1979. The R17 was sold as R177 in Italy, respecting the heptadecaphobia superstition. They were effectively coupé versions of the Renault 12. The main differences between the two cars were their headlight configuration (the 15 had two rectangular headlights whereas the 17 had four round headlights) and their rear side windows. Some markets show the 17 with the rectangular lights for TL versions.

Renault 7 (1974–1984)

1978 Renault 7
1978 Renault 7
The Renault 7 (or "R7") is a 4-door saloon version of the Renault 5 supermini, produced and sold in Spain by Renault's subsidiary, FASA-Renault from 1974 to 1984. It was very similar to the R5 hatchback (which had been launched two years earlier), and identical mechanically, but offered with a smaller range of engines. The R7 had four doors and a saloon-style boot in place of the original car's three (and later five) doors including hatchback. This involved extending the wheelbase by just under 6 cm (2 2⁄5 in) though it retained the wheelbase difference between left and right sides, characteristic of several Renault models, resulting from the use of full-width torsion bars placed one behind the other, ahead of the rear wheels.

Renault 20/30 (1975–1984)

1975 Renault 20
1975 Renault 20
The Renault 20 (R20) and Renault 30 (R30) are two executive cars produced by the French automaker Renault between 1975 and 1984. The most up market and expensive Renaults of their time, the two cars were almost identical with regard to sheet metal and mechanicals; the R30 was the larger-engined and more expensive of the two. The two cars were easily distinguished between each other from their differing headlight configuration – the Renault 20 had two single rectangular headlights whereas the Renault 30 had quadruple round headlights. The interior specifications differed substantially however with the Renault 30 having a higher specification in all models. Over 622,000 R20s and 145,000 R30s were produced in Sandouville near Le Havre, France.

Renault 14 (1976–1979)

1976 Renault 14
1976 Renault 14
The Renault 14 is a compact car produced by the French manufacturer Renault between 1976 and 1983. It was first shown in January 1976 with production beginning in June of that year. It was the first car to be produced in large volumes at the company's then new plant at Douai, although small pilot runs of the Renault 5 had preceded the 14's production in the factory.

Renault 18 (1978–1986)

1978 Renault 18
1978 Renault 18
The Renault 18 is a large family car produced by French manufacturer Renault between 1978 and 1989, with South American production continuing until 1994. It formed the basis for the closely related Renault Fuego Coupé, with which it shared its floorpan and drivetrain, but with the Fuego initially using the negative offset type front suspension from the larger Renault 20/30, which became standardized across the 18 range from the 1983 model year onwards.

Renault Fuego (1980–1987)

1980 Renault Fuego
1980 Renault Fuego
The Renault Fuego (fire in Spanish) is a sport compact car that was produced by Renault from 1980 to 1992, replacing the Renault 15 and 17 coupés of the 1970s. It was marketed in the United States by American Motors Corporation (AMC), and was also assembled in several countries in South America. The official Renault website states that a total of 265,367 Fuegos were produced, with production in France from December 1979 to October 1985 making up 226,583 (85%) of the total.

Renault 9 and 11 (1982–1988)

1982 Renault 9
1982 Renault 9
The Renault 9 and Renault 11 are small family cars produced by the French manufacturer Renault for model years 1981–1988 in saloon (Renault 9) and hatchback (Renault 11) configurations — both were styled by the French automobile designer, Robert Opron. Variants were manufactured by American Motors Corporation (AMC), as the Renault Alliance and Renault Encore for the North American market. The car was produced in Turkey until 2004.

Renault 25 (1984–1992)

1984 Renault 25 GTX
1984 Renault 25 GTX
The Renault 25 is an executive car produced by the French automaker Renault from 1983 to 1992. During its time, the 25 was Renault's flagship, the most expensive, prestigious, and largest vehicle in the company's line up. It placed second in the 1985 European Car of the Year contest. All 25s were built in Sandouville, near Le Havre, France.

Renault 21 (1986–1993)

1986 Renault 21
1986 Renault 21
The Renault 21 is a large family car produced by French automaker Renault between 1986 and 1994. It was also sold in North America initially through American Motors dealers as the Renault Medallion and later through Jeep-Eagle dealers as the Eagle Medallion. A total of 2,096,000 units were produced.

Renault Medallion (1988–1989)

1988 Renault Medallion
1988 Renault Medallion
The Eagle Medallion, also marketed as the Renault Medallion, was a rebadged and mildly re-engineered North American version of the French Renault 21 marketed by Eagle. The front-engine, front-wheel drive, four-door mid-size Medallions were imported from France, sharing their platform as the Renault 21. Concurrently with the North American introduction of the Medallion, Renault sold its American business to Chrysler.

Renault 19 (1988–1995)

1988 Renault 19
1988 Renault 19
The Renault 19 is a small family car that was produced by the French car manufacturer Renault between 1988 and 1996. In Turkey and in Argentina, production continued until 2000. The internal development code for the 19 was X53, with the five door receiving the B53 chassis code, the three door being the C53, the Chamade the L53, and the Cabriolet the D53

Renault Safrane (1992–2000)

1992 Renault Safrane
1992 Renault Safrane
The Renault Safrane was an executive car (E-segment in Europe) designed and built by Renault from 1992 to 2000. Throughout its lifespan, it remained the most expensive and most luxurious Renault available, although its commercial success was limited, compared to some similar models. It was replaced by the Vel Satis, and to some extent, by the short lived two door Avantime.

Renault Laguna (1993–2015)

1993 Renault Laguna
1993 Renault Laguna
The Renault Laguna is a large family car by European standards, and was produced by Renault from 1993 to 2015. The first Laguna was launched in 1994, the second generation was launched in 2000, and the third generation was launched in October 2007.

Renault Avantime (2001–2003)

2001 Renault Avantime
2001 Renault Avantime
The Renault Avantime is a grand tourer marketed by Renault, designed and manufactured by Matra, between 2001 and 2003. As a one-box design without B-pillars, styled by Patrick Le Quément, the Avantime combined the design elements of an MPV, estate or shooting brake with the style of a 2+2 coupé and elements of a convertible.

Renault Vel Satis (2001–2009)

2001 Renault Vel Satis
2001 Renault Vel Satis
The Renault Vel Satis is an executive car that was produced by Renault, launched at the 2001 Geneva Motor Show to replace the already discontinued Safrane. It was previously revealed as a concept car in 1998, at the Paris Motor Show. However, the following production model does not have very much in common with it.

Renault Modus (2004–2012)

2004 Renault Modus
2004 Renault Modus
The Renault Modus was a mini MPV produced by Renault from August 2004 to December 2012, in Valladolid, Spain. The production version is very similar to the concept car of the same name, which was presented at the 2004 Geneva Motor Show. It is essentially a taller version of the Clio III and, as such, shared its platform and much of its engine range with the third generation of the Clio. A larger wheelbase version was produced as the Renault Grand Modus. Originally marketed as "a higher-range alternative to the Twingo and Clio"

Renault Wind (2010–2012)

2010 Renault Wind
2010 Renault Wind
The Renault Wind was a two seater roadster. The Wind was originally a concept car unveiled on September 2004 at the Paris Motor Show as a 2+1 roadster. On February 2, 2010, Renault announced that the Wind would enter production. It was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show on March 2, 2010.

Renault Clio (1990–present)

2019 Renault Clio
2019 Renault Clio
The Renault Clio is a supermini car (B-segment), produced by Renault. It was launched in 1990, and was in its fourth generation in 2012. The Clio has had substantial critical and commercial success, being consistently one of Europe's top-selling cars since its launch, and it is largely credited with restoring Renault's reputation and stature after a difficult second half of the 1980s. The Clio is one of only three cars, the others being the Volkswagen Golf and Opel Astra, to have been voted European Car of the Year twice, in 1991 and 2006.

Renault Fluence (2010–present)

2019 Renault Fluence
2019 Renault Fluence
The Renault Fluence is a medium sedan produced by Renault. The car was produced until 2016 at the Oyak-Renault plant in Bursa, Turkey, and it still is produced in Santa Isabel, Argentina, for the Latin American market and in Busan, South Korea, for the Asia-Pacific market. On 12 July 2016, Renault unveiled the successor to the Fluence, initially for the European market, the Mégane Sedan IV.

Renault Latitude (2011–present)

2019 Renault Latitude
2019 Renault Latitude
The Renault Latitude is an executive car produced by Renault, and announced in June 2010. It débuted at the Moscow International Automobile Salon, at the end of August 2010. The Latitude is a four door saloon based on the Renault/Nissan D platform, and already developed as the third generation (L43) Renault Samsung SM5. The Latitude was face lifted for 2015, with a new rear fascia.

Renault Logan (2004–present)

2019 Renault Logan
2019 Renault Logan
The Dacia Logan is a small family car produced jointly by Renault and its Romanian subsidiary Dacia since 2004. It is currently in its second generation and it has been produced as a sedan, station wagon, notchback or pick-up. It has also been marketed as the Renault Logan, Nissan Aprio, Mahindra Verito, Renault Tondar 90, Lada Largus (the MCV), Nissan NP200

Renault Mégane (1996–present)

2019 Renault Mégane
2019 Renault Mégane
The Renault Mégane is a small family car produced by Renault since the end of 1995, and was the successor to the Renault 19. The Mégane has been offered in three and five door hatchback, saloon, coupé, convertible and estate body styles at various points in its lifetime, and having been through three generations is now in its fourth incarnation.

Renault Pulse/Nissan Micra (2012–present)

2019 Renault Pulse
2019 Renault Pulse
The Nissan Micra, known in Latin America and in most of Asia as the Nissan March, is a supermini produced by  Nissan since 1982. The Nissan Micra was not sold in Korea and Southern Asia whereas in Japan the Micra replaced the Japanese-market Nissan Cherry. It was exclusive to Nissan Japanese dealership network Nissan Cherry Store until 1999, when the "Cherry" network was combined into Nissan Red Stage until 2003. Until Nissan began selling badge engineered superminis from other Japanese manufacturers the March was Nissan's smallest vehicle, and was not renamed and sold at other Japanese Nissan dealership networks.

Renault Sandero (2007–present)

2019 Renault Sandero
2019 Renault Sandero
The Dacia Sandero is a subcompact car produced jointly by Renault and its Romanian subsidiary Dacia since 2007, currently at its second generation. It is also marketed as the Renault Sandero in certain markets, such as Russia, Egypt, South Africa, Mexico, and South America. It was introduced in September 2007, and is based on the Logan platform. It is also produced in Iran by Pars Khodro and marketed as Renault Sandero.

Renault Scénic (1996–present)

2019 Renault Scénic
2019 Renault Scénic
The Renault Scénic is a compact multi-purpose vehicle (MPV) produced by Renault, the first to be labelled as such in Europe. It is based on the chassis of the Mégane small family car. It became the 1997 European Car of the Year on its launch in November 1996. The second, third and fourth generations have a model called Grand Scénic, which has seven seats rather than five.

Renault Talisman (2012–present)

2019 Renault Talisman SE
2019 Renault Talisman SE
The Renault Samsung SM7 is an executive car or full-size car (E-segment in Europe) produced by the Korean manufacturer Renault Samsung Motors since 2004. In October 2002 Renault Samsung Motors started to work on the "EX" project, a new car based on the Nissan J31 platform which shared underpinnings with the Nissan Teana (in Asian markets) and the sixth-generation Nissan Maxima (in Europe, North America and Australia). On 30 November 2004 the new car was revealed to the public as a high-end model.

Renault Symbol/Thalia (1999–present)

2019 Renault Symbol
2019 Renault Symbol
The Renault Symbol, or Thalia in some markets, is a subcompact car produced by the French automobile manufacturer Renault. It was introduced in late 1999, under the Clio Symbol name, as the sedan version of the second generation Renault Clio, and unlike the hatchback it was marketed only in those countries where saloons were traditionally preferred over hatchbacks, while it was not available in Western Europe.

Renault Twingo (1992-present)

1992 Renault Twingo
1992 Renault Twingo
2015 Renault Twingo
2015 Renault Twingo
2019 Renault Twingo
2019 Renault Twingo
The Renault Twingo, a city car produced and sold by Renault. The original Twingo (two-door, front engine) appeared at the Paris Motor Show in September 1992, getting its formal market dispatch in European markets starting in 1993. Renault announced the second-generation Twingo (two-door, front engine) in the late spring of 2007—and the third generation (four-door, rear engine) appeared at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show with formal market launch in September 2014.

Throughout the decades Renault had built up a synergistic association with Nash Motors and its successor American Motors (AMC). From 1962 to 1967, Renault assembled knock down (CKD) Rambler Classic vehicle kits in its manufacturing plant in Belgium. Renault did not have luxury or huge autos in its product offerings and the "Rambler Renault" was situated as an option to the Mercedes-Benz "Fintail" autos. Later, Renault kept on making and offer an AMC hybrid Rambler American and Rambler Classic known as the Renault Torino in Argentina (marketed through IKA-Renault). Renault became a partner with AMC on other projects, for example, a rotary engine concept in the late 1960s.

Renault Sports Cars

Renault Sport Spider (1996-1999)

1996 Renault Sport Spider
1996 Renault Sport Spider
The Renault Sport Spider is a roadster produced by Renault Sport (a subsidiary of Renault) between 1996 and 1999. The idea for the Renault Spider was formulated in the early 1990s: in the midst of a revival after a difficult second half of the 1980s, Renault wanted a car to promote it as a sporting brand (similar to the Renault 5 Turbo from a decade earlier). The Spider was intended to both serve as a racing car, in a one-make series organized by Renault, and as a road car.

Renault Suvs/Crossovers

Renault Rodeo (1970–1987)

1970 Renault Rodeo
1970 Renault Rodeo
The Renault Rodeo is a series of off-road mini SUVs produced between 1970 and 1987 by ACL, later called Teilhol, for Renault. In total there were three generations of the Rodeo. At first the car was called ACL Rodeo and the name was changed to Renault Rodeo in July 1976. Car was front wheel drive but could be ordered also with four wheel drive technic supplied by Sinpar.

Renault Espace (1984–present)

2019 Renault Espace
2019 Renault Espace
The Renault Espace is a mid-size luxury crossover manufactured by Renault currently in its fifth generation. The first three generations Espace was among the first contemporary minivans or MPVs and were manufactured by Matra for Renault. The Renault Grand Espace is a long-wheelbase (LWB) version with increased rear leg room and boot size. The name "Espace" means "space" in French. In February 2012, the Espace was retired in the United Kingdom, as part of a cost cutting plan.

Renault Koleos (2007-present)

2019 Renault Koleos Minuit
2019 Renault Koleos Minuit
The Renault Koleos is a mid size SUV which was first presented as a concept car at the Geneva Motor Show in 2000, and then again in 2006 at the Mondial de l'Automobile in Paris. The first generation Koleos was designed by Renault and developed by Nissan, with the majority of the production coming from the Busan plant of Renault Samsung Motors. Facelifted versions of the Koleos were available in October 2011 and June 2013. A second generation was unveiled at the 2016 Beijing Motor Show, and uses the Renault-Nissan Common Module Family (CMF-CD) modular platform.

Renault Dacia Duster (2011–present)

2019 Renault Dacia Duster
2019 Renault Dacia Duster
The Dacia Duster is a compact sport utility vehicle (SUV) produced jointly by Renault and its Romanian subsidiary Dacia since 2010. It is currently at its second generation, that was launched in the autumn of 2017, and it has also been marketed as the Renault Duster in certain markets, such as India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia, Mexico, Egypt, South Africa, Ukraine, the UAE and in South America. Its first generation was also rebadged as the Nissan Terrano in Russia and India. It is the third model of the Dacia brand based on the Logan platform, after the Sandero.

Renault Captur (2013–present)

2019 Renault Captur
2019 Renault Captur
Renault Captur is the name of two different subcompact crossovers manufactured by Renault. The production version of the first one, based on the B platform, made its debut at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show and started to be marketed in France during April 2013. The Captur Concept was first shown at the 2011 Geneva Motor Show.

Renault Kadjar (2015-present)

2019 Renault Kadjar
2019 Renault Kadjar
The Renault Kadjar is a compact SUV (J) from Renault, offered with a choice of two wheel drive with an Extended Grip system or full four wheel drive. The Renault Kadjar was unveiled at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show with sales starting in April 2015 in Europe and in 2016 in China.

Renault Kwid (2015-present)

2018 Renault Kwid
2018 Renault Kwid
The Renault Kwid is an entry-level crossover produced by Renault, initially intended for the Indian market. The production version was unveiled in May 2015. A concept version was previously unveiled in February 2014. A revised Brazilian version was put into production in 2017. The Kwid has been elaborated by a French engineers team settled in India by Gérard Detourbet, a mathematician described as "an innovation a minute" who led the development team for the first-generation Renault Logan.

Renault Electric

Renault Twizy (2012-present)

2017 Renault Twizy
2017 Renault Twizy
The Renault Twizy is a two-seat electric car designed and marketed by Renault and manufactured in Valladolid, Spain. Legally classified in Europe as a heavy quadricycle (light quadricycle for the lower-powered Urban 45 model), the Twizy has a maximum range of 62 miles. The Twizy debuted as a concept car at the 2009 Frankfurt Motor Show and was designed by Françoise Leboinne and Luciano Bove. In November 2010, Nissan announced a rebadged variant to the Twizy, called the New Mobility Concept, or NMC. In May 2011, Renault announced they would produce the Twizy and began taking reservations.

Renault Fluence Z.E. (2013-present)

2019 Renault Fluence Z.E.
2019 Renault Fluence Z.E.
The Renault Fluence Z.E. is an electric version of the Renault Fluence compact sedan, part of the Renault Z.E. program of battery electric vehicles. It was unveiled by Renault at the 2009 Frankfurt Motor Show. The Fluence Z.E. is outfitted with a 22 kWh lithium-ion battery which allows a total all-electric range of (115 miles) measured on the NEDC combined cycle, with speeds up to (84 mph)

Renault Zoe (2012-present)

2019 Renault ZOE
2019 Renault ZOE
Renault Zoe (sometimes stylized as ZOE and pronounced as "Zoé") is a five-door supermini electric car produced by the French manufacturer Renault. Earlier Zoes have a 22 kWh lithium-ion battery pack that delivers a range between (130 miles) and (150 miles) under the NEDC cycle. In September 2016, Renault announced the introduction of an optional 41 kWh lithium-ion battery, increasing the range to (250 miles) under the NEDC cycle.

Renault Pickups

Renault Duster Oroch (2015-present)

2015 Renault Duster Oroch
2015 Renault Duster Oroch
2019 Renault Duster Oroch
2019 Renault Duster Oroch
The Renault Duster Oroch is a double cab pickup truck produced by Renault for the South American market since September 2015. It has four doors, space for five passengers, a 1,433 lb load capacity and a 180 US gallon rear volume. It is based on the Dacia Duster SUV, with a wheelbase extended by 6.1 inches and a total length extended to 15.42 ft. This is the first Renault-badged pick-up and it creates a new size class for pickup trucks in terms of size, space and doors.

Renault Vans/MPVs

Renault Estafette (1959-1980)

The Renault Estafette was a light commercial front-wheel drive van, first introduced in 1959 and made by Renault between 1959 and 1980, initially using the water-cooled Renault Ventoux engine, then later the Cléon-Fonte engine in a range of body styles. Following the launch of the Estafette, Renault became the only auto-maker in the world to simultaneously produce and sell vehicles with all three of the drive train configurations commonly used, with the front engined front wheel drive Estafette, along with various rear engined rear wheel drive cars such as the Dauphine and the front engined rear wheel drive Frégate and the ageing Dauphinoise.

Get Your Very Own Renault Scale Models
1961 Renault Dauphine Scale Model Shown
1961 Renault Dauphine Scale Model Shown
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    Renault Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5