2019 Lincoln MKZ

Lincoln Motor Cars Through the Years

A Pictorial Glimpse at Lincoln Motor Cars Through the Years

The Lincoln Motor Company (additionally referred to just as Lincoln) (known as THE LINCOLN MOTOR COMPANY or essentially as LINCOLN) is a division of the U.S.- based Ford Motor Company that offers luxury vehicles under the Lincoln marque. Established by Henry M. Leland in 1917, Lincoln has been a Ford subsidiary since 1922. While basically sold in North America, In 2014 Ford introduced the Lincoln brand to China. Lincoln vehicles are additionally sold in the Middle East and South Korea.

Read the book: The Lincoln motorcar: The complete history of an American classic

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The present Lincoln North America models comprise of two cars (Continental and MKZ), three hybrid utility vehicles (MKC, MKT, and MKX), plus a sport utility vehicle (Navigator/Navigator L). Lincoln likewise offers two vehicles particularly for limousine/livery, both based upon the MKT.

Acquisition by Ford

Amid the mid 1920s, Lincoln endured extreme money related issues, balancing the loss of income of Liberty motor production with the outdated design of the costly Model L. In the wake of having delivered just 150 autos in 1922, Lincoln Motor Company was forced to file into chapter 11 bankruptcy and liquidated to the Ford Motor Company for $8,000,000 on February 4, 1922; a portion of the returns of the deal went to pay off creditors.

For Henry Ford, acquiring Lincoln was a personal jubilation, as he had been forced from of his second organization (Henry Ford Company) by an investor group headed by Leland. The organization, renamed Cadillac in 1902 was acquired by General Motors in 1909, serving as the main rival to Lincoln. While Henry Ford had already presented Ford-branded luxury automobiles (the Model B Ford in 1904, the Model F Ford in 1905-1906, and the Model K Ford in 1906-1908), the organization had little acceptance. With the Lincoln acquisition, the nameplate turned into a top-selling rival alongside Duesenberg, Pierce-Arrow, Marmon, Peerless, and Packard.

Despite the fact that the chassis itself saw few noteworthy changes (with its L-head motor and surprising 60-degree cylinder block), the body received major updates. At the direction of Henry's child, Edsel. In 1923 many body styles were added, that included two-and three-window, four-door cars and a phaeton that accommodated four passengers. They additionally produced a two-passenger roadster along with a seven-passenger touring sedan and limousine, which were priced at $5,200. A limo, cabriolet, sedan and town car were additionally offered by Fleetwood, Derham and Dietrich coachbuilders, and a second cabriolet was available by coachbuilder Brunn. Lincoln contracted with many coachbuilders amid the 1920s and mid 30s to make various custom manufactured vehicles, which included American, Anderson, Babcock, LeBaron, Holbrook, Judkins, Lang, Locke, Murray, Willough and Towson during the 1920s. Murphy, Rollston, and Waterhouse were included the 1930s.

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Lincoln Model L (1917-1930)

1917 Lincoln Model L
1917 Lincoln Model L
1918 Lincoln L Touring Sedan
1918 Lincoln L Touring Sedan
1921 Lincoln Model L
1921 Lincoln Model L
1922 Lincoln Model L Touring
1922 Lincoln Model L Touring
1923 Lincoln Model L
1923 Lincoln Model L
1924 Lincoln Model L
1924 Lincoln Model L
1925 Lincoln Model L Berline Sedan
1925 Lincoln Model L Berline Sedan
1926 Lincoln Model L Berline Sedan
1926 Lincoln Model L Berline Sedan
1929 Lincoln Model L
1929 Lincoln Model L
1930 Lincoln Model L
1930 Lincoln Model L
After leaving the company over a dispute with William Durant over World War I production, Cadillac founder Henry Leland created the Lincoln Motor Company. the company produced Liberty V12 aircraft engines as its only source of revenue. With the war finished Lelands decided to make the Lincoln Motor car. The company was reorganized in 1920 & created the first L-series car in 1920, for sale as a 1921 model.

The L series was designed by Angus Woodbridge, the son-in-law of Henry Leland; trained as a ladies hat maker, the design of the L series was considered old-fashioned for the time. In the years following World War I, the Lincoln Motor Company struggled in the postwar recession with repeated, false tax evasion claims.

Lincoln Model K (1931-1940)

1931 Lincoln Model K
1931 Lincoln Model K
1932 Lincoln Model KB Coupe
1932 Lincoln Model KB Coupe
1933 Lincoln K Series
1933 Lincoln K Series
1934 Lincoln Custom
1934 Lincoln Custom
1935 Lincoln Model K Coupe
1935 Lincoln Model K Coupe
1936 Lincoln Model KB Sedan
1936 Lincoln Model KB Sedan
1937 Lincoln Model K Limosine
1937 Lincoln Model K Limosine
1938 Lincoln Model K Convertible
1938 Lincoln Model K Convertible
1939 Lincoln LeBaron Model K
1939 Lincoln LeBaron Model K
Judkins-bodied 1939 Lincoln five-passenger limousine. Photo by Jeff Koch.
Judkins-bodied 1939 Lincoln five-passenger limousine
The original Model K appeared in the 1931 model year on a new chassis with a 145 in (3683 mm) wheelbase. Factory bodies included two- and four-door phaetons, the latter available as a dual-cowl model. The 384.8 in³ (6.3 L) engine was a derivative of the earlier L-series 60° V8, but a dual venturi downdraft Stromberg carburetor, higher compression, and altered timing raised the power to 120 hp (89 kW). It competed with the recently introduced Chrysler Imperial, Rolls-Royce Phantom II, Mercedes-Benz 770, Duesenberg Model J, Packard Eight, and the Cadillac Series 355.

Lincoln Zephyr (1936-1940)

1936 Lincoln Zephyr 4 Door Sedan
1936 Lincoln Zephyr 4 Door Sedan
1937 Lincoln Zephyr Club Coupe
1937 Lincoln Zephyr Club Coupe
1938 Lincoln Zephyr Convertible
1938 Lincoln Zephyr Convertible
1940 Lincoln Zephyr Business Coupe
1940 Lincoln Zephyr Business Coupe
1941 Lincoln Zephyr Club Coupe
1941 Lincoln Zephyr Club Coupe

Continental (1939-1948, 1956-1959, 1961-1969)

Lincoln Continental First generation (1939–1948)

1939 Lincoln Continental
1939 Lincoln Continental
1940 Lincoln Continental
1940 Lincoln Continental
1941 Lincoln Continental Coupe
1941 Lincoln Continental Coupe
1942 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
1942 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
1946 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
1946 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
1947 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
1947 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
1948 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
1948 Lincoln Continental Cabrolet
Lincoln Continentals from 1939 to 1941 shared largely the same body design with each other; based on the Lincoln-Zephyr, the Continental received few updates from year to year. For the 1942 model year, all Lincoln models were given squared-up fenders, and a revised grille. The result was a boxier, somewhat heavier look in keeping with then-current design trends, but perhaps less graceful in retrospect. 1942 production was shortened, following the entry of the United States into World War II; the attack on Pearl Harbor led to the suspension of production of automobiles for civilian use.

Lincoln Continental 2nd generation Mark II (1956–1957)

1955 Lincoln Continental Mark II
1955 Lincoln Continental Mark II
1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II
1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II
1957 Continental Mark II
1957 Lincoln Continental Mark II
After an eight-year hiatus, for the 1956 model year, the Continental nameplate made its return; to launch the vehicle, Ford created a namesake Continental division centered around its new flagship vehicle. To again highlight the European influence of the original Continental, Ford assigned the "Mark II" suffix to the new Continental (also in an effort to distinguish itself from the similar Bentley Continental). Slotted (far) above Lincoln-Mercury, Continentals would be marketed and serviced through the Lincoln dealership network.

Lincoln Continental Third generation (1958–1960)

1958 Lincoln Continental
1958 Lincoln Continental
1959 Lincoln Continental
1959 Lincoln Continental
1960 Lincoln Convertible
1960 Lincoln Convertible
To build a better business case for its flagship and the division that marketed the vehicle, for 1958, Ford Motor Company made extensive changes to its Continental Division. To widen its sales potential, Ford required Continental to reach a $6000 price (a 40% reduction from the Mark II), allowing the division to better compete against Cadillac Eldorado and Imperial LeBaron. To allow for production at a larger scale, the Continental model line was more closely integrated with Lincoln, differing primarily in roofline, trim, and grille. In 1959, Ford ended the Continental Division; its model line lived through 1960 alongside Lincoln.

Lincoln Continental Fourth generation (1961–1969)

1961 Lincoln Continental
1961 Lincoln Continental
1962 Lincoln Continental
1962 Lincoln Continental
1963 Lincoln Continental
1963 Lincoln Continental
1964 Lincoln Continental
1964 Lincoln Continental
1965 Lincoln Continental
1965 Lincoln Continental
1966 Lincoln Continental
1966 Lincoln Continental
1967 Lincoln Continental
1967 Lincoln Continental
1968 Lincoln Continental
1968 Lincoln Continental
1969 Lincoln Continental
1969 Lincoln Continental
For the 1961 model year the Lincoln range was consolidated into one model. Following the $60 million in losses to develop the 1958–1960 cars, all models were replaced by a new Lincoln Continental. Making its first appearance since 1948, the fourth-generation was available only as a four-door sedan and convertible until its refresh in 1966.

Lincoln Mark Series (Eight Generations)

Lincoln Mark III (1969-1971)

1969 Lincoln Continental Mark III
1969 Lincoln Continental Mark III
1970 Lincoln Continental Mark III
1970 Lincoln Continental Mark III
1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III
1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III
The Continental Mark III was manufactured by Lincoln for model years 1969 through 1971. The Mark III was created when Lee Iacocca, president of Ford Motor Company at the time, directed Design Vice President, Gene Bordinat, to "put a Rolls Royce grille on a Thunderbird" in September 1965. The Mark III was based on the four-door Thunderbird platform, which was first introduced for 1967. It joined the larger 1966 Lincoln Continental 2-door sedan.

Lincoln Mark IV (1972-1976)

1972 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1972 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1973 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1973 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1975 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1975 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1976 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
1976 Lincoln Continental Mark IV
The Mark IV carried over many design themes of the Mark III including the grille and faux spare tire trunk lid, and grew both longer and wider — sharing its platform with the Ford Thunderbird. In 1972, Lincoln introduced the small oval windows, marketed as opera windows, at the roof rear quarters. The 1973 model year featured front bumpers to comply with new US safety regulations that required all passenger cars to withstand a 5-mile-per-hour (8 km/h) front and a 2.5-mile-per-hour rear impact. 1974 models featured redesigned rear bumpers under mandatory federal safety regulations. It was the heaviest series of all generations.

Lincoln Mark V (1977-1979)

1977 Lincoln Continental Mark V
1977 Lincoln Continental Mark V
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V
1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V Bill Blass
1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V Bill Blass
Introduced for the 1977 model year, the Continental Mark V was a major revision of the Mark IV. The rounded styling of the previous generation gave way to a sharper-edged look. Interior design remained similar to the Mark IV, with variants in the seat patterns and dashboard trim (while retaining the general dashboard layout of the IV) being the primary differences. As the Ford Thunderbird was downsized and based on the intermediate chassis utilized by the Ford LTD II and Mercury Cougar XR7, the Mark V utilized its own chassis carried over from the Mark IV. The Mark V was larger and more complex than its predecessor, coming just ten inches short of 20 feet long. The electrical system and mechanical componentry shared less in common with other Ford products, and was harder to service than the corresponding equipment on the Mark IV.

Lincoln Mark VI (1980-1983)

1980 Lincoln Continental Mark VI
1980 Lincoln Continental Mark VI
1981 Lincoln Continental Mark VI
1981 Lincoln Continental Mark VI
1982 Lincoln Continental Mark VI Sedan
1982 Lincoln Continental Mark VI Sedan
1983 Lincoln Continental Mark VI
1983 Lincoln Continental Mark VI
The Continental Mark VI introduced downsizing to the Mark series alongside the introduction of a four-door sedan bodystyle. Based on the success of the Mark V, the Mark VI adopted many of the exterior styling cues of its predecessor, including its oval opera windows, radiator-style grille, "Continental" spare-tire decklid, hidden headlamps, vertical taillamps, and front fender louvers.

Lincoln Mark VII (1984-1992)

1986 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1986 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1988 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1988 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1989 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1989 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1990 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1990 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1992 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
1992 Lincoln Continental Mark VII
For the 1984 model year, to split the model line from the full-size Town Car, the Mark VI was replaced by the Mark VII, shifting the Mark series into the mid-size segment. While marketed as a personal luxury car, the Mark VII sought a role as the technology flagship of Ford Motor Company, featuring a number of comfort, convenience, and performance options introduced during the 1980s. Along with power accessories and leather seating, the Mark VII featured keyless entry, digital instruments, and an onboard computer/message center. The Mark VII was notable for becoming the first vehicle in North America sold with aerodynamic composite headlights after legislation permitted their sale in the United States; in addition, electronic 4-channel anti-lock brakes were sold first on the Mark VII (November 1984, six months before the Chevrolet Corvette).

Lincoln Mark VIII (1993-1998)

1993 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1993 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1994 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1994 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1995 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1995 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1997 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1997 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1998 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
1998 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII
Released for the 1993 model year, the Lincoln Mark VIII continued the role of the Mark VII as a luxury-oriented grand touring coupe. Slightly larger than its predecessor, the Mark VIII was sized nearly halfway between the Mark VI and the Mark VII in length (with its wheelbase only an inch shorter than the Mark VI coupe). Despite its larger footprint, the curb weight of the Mark VIII remained essentially the same as its predecessor. As the Mark VIII remained a mechanical counterpart to the Ford Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar, the Mark Series ended the use of the Fox platform in favor of the all-new FN10 platform (a Lincoln-exclusive variant of the MN12 platform). With its wheelbase stretched to 113 inches (only an inch shorter than the much larger Ford Panther platform), much of the extra interior space was given to the rear seat. Replaced by the Lincoln LS

Lincoln H Series (1946-1948)

1946 Lincoln H Series Club Coupe
1946 Lincoln H Series Club Coupe
1947 Lincoln H Series Club Coupe
1947 Lincoln H Series Club Coupe
1948 Lincoln H Series Sedan
1948 Lincoln H Series Sedan
The Lincoln H-series is a full-size luxury car that was sold by Lincoln from the 1946 through the 1948 model years. Their appearance was very similar to the contemporaneous Lincoln Continental coupe and convertible. An electric clock was standard. This series of vehicles continued to use the 305 in³ (4.8 L) 65° L-head Lincoln V12 engine.

Lincoln EL Series (1949-1951)

1949 Lincoln 2 Door
1949 Lincoln 2 Door
1950 Lincoln 2 Door
1950 Lincoln 2 Door
The first all-new postwar Lincolns were introduced on April 22, 1948. They had a more streamlined appearance than the 1948 models, reflecting "ponton" styling. However the new two-piece windshield seemed a bit out of sync with the modern styling. From a distance it was hard to tell a Lincoln apart from a Mercury. Recessed headlights and a shinier front end set it apart. The 337 cubic inch Lincoln flathead V8 produced 152 hp at 3600 rpm.

Lincoln Cosmopolitan (1949-1954)

1949 Lincoln Cosmopolitan Town Sedan
1949 Lincoln Cosmopolitan Town Sedan
1949 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1949 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1950 Lincoln Cosmopolitan Capri
1950 Lincoln Cosmopolitan Capri
1951 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1951 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1952 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1952 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1953 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1953 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1954 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
1954 Lincoln Cosmopolitan
In 1949, Lincoln introduced its first postwar bodies, also marking the first product lines of the combined Lincoln-Mercury Division. Although sharing many body panels with the Mercury Eight and the standard Lincoln, the 1949 Lincoln Cosmopolitan was marketed as the flagship of the Lincoln line; the model was distinguished by its own rear roofline.

Lincoln Capri (1952-1959)

1952 Lincoln Capri Convertible
1952 Lincoln Capri Convertible
1953 Lincoln Capri Convertible
1953 Lincoln Capri Convertible
1954 Lincoln Capri Sedan
1954 Lincoln Capri Sedan
1955 Lincoln Capri Convertible
1955 Lincoln Capri Convertible
1956 Lincoln Capri
1956 Lincoln Capri
1957 Lincoln Capri
1957 Lincoln Capri
1958 Lincoln Capri
1958 Lincoln Capri
1959 Lincoln Capri
1959 Lincoln Capri
Introduced as a premium trim variant of the two-door Lincoln Cosmopolitan, the Capri was introduced in 1952 as a stand-alone model line serving as the premium Lincoln. With the introduction of the Lincoln Premiere (and Continental), the Capri replaced the Cosmopolitan as the standard Lincoln product line. The Lincoln Capri was produced across three generations; following its withdrawal, Lincoln rebranded the Capri using only its division name (following a practice used from 1946 to 1951). Along with the Lincoln Premiere and the Continental model lines, the Lincoln Capri was replaced by the 1961 Lincoln Continental.

Lincoln Premier (1956-1960)

1956 Lincoln Premier
1956 Lincoln Premier
1957 Lincoln Premier
1957 Lincoln Premier
1958 Lincoln Premier
1958 Lincoln Premier
1959 Lincoln Premier
1959 Lincoln Premier
1960 Lincoln Premier
1960 Lincoln Premier
The Premiere was introduced in 1956 as an upscale version of the Lincoln Capri. It featured a 368 cu in (6.0 L) Lincoln Y-Block V8 and it was approximately 223" long in 1956. The vehicle weighed 4357 lb and had a base price of $4,601 in 1956, which converts to roughly $41,482 in current dollars. The top-end Lincoln, it was substantially different from the much more expensive Continental Mark II sold by Ford's Continental Motorcars division. It was succeeded by the 1960 Lincoln Continental

Lincoln Versailles (1977-1980)

1977 Lincoln Versailles
1977 Lincoln Versailles
1977 Lincoln Versailles
1977 Lincoln Versailles
1978 Lincoln Versailles
1978 Lincoln Versailles
1979 Lincoln Versailles
1979 Lincoln Versailles
1980 Lincoln Versailles
1980 Lincoln Versailles
During the development of the Lincoln Versailles, Ford had a smaller budget than General Motors. As it was released in 1977, the Lincoln Versailles showed relatively few exterior differences from the Mercury Monarch sold beside it in the same showroom. With the front fascia, the body was restyled slightly from the Monarch to give a resemblance to the Continental Mark V and restyled 1977 Lincoln Continental Town Car. In a major departure, the Versailles marked the debut of rectangular headlamps on a Lincoln, also becoming the first Lincoln with exposed headlamps since 1969. The rear fascia was restyled slightly, with a Mark V styled "Continental spare" trunklid lettered LINCOLN instead of CONTINENTAL.

Lincoln LS (1999-2006)

2000 Lincoln LS
2000 Lincoln LS
2003 Lincoln LS
2003 Lincoln LS
2004 Lincoln LS
2004 Lincoln LS
2005 Lincoln LS
2005 Lincoln LS
2006 Lincoln LS
2006 Lincoln LS
The Lincoln LS is a four-door, five-passenger luxury sedan that was manufactured by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company. The LS was introduced in June 1999 as a 2000 model-year vehicle with either a V6 engine (which was offered with a manual transmission) or a V8 engine, both featuring rear-wheel drive and near 50/50 weight distribution. The LS shared the Ford DEW98 platform, along with the Jaguar S-Type and the Ford Thunderbird. Replaced by the Lincoln MKZ

Lincoln MKZ (Zephyr) (2005-present)

2005 Lincoln MKZ
2005 Lincoln MKZ
2010 Lincoln MKZ
2010 Lincoln MKZ
2012 Lincoln MKZ
2012 Lincoln MKZ
2017 Lincoln MKZ
2017 Lincoln MKZ
2018 Lincoln MKZ
2018 Lincoln MKZ
2019 Lincoln MKZ
2019 Lincoln MKZ
Ford redesigned the Lincoln MKZ for the 2013 model year, sharing the company's CD4 platform with Fusion and Mondeo. The concept model debuted at the 2012 North American International Auto Show. The production version of the second-generation MKZ was unveiled at the 2012 New York Auto Show. It followed the general concept idea released in the model displayed at the 2012 Detroit Auto Show.

Lincoln Continental - Tenth Generation (2016-present)

2016 Lincoln Continental
2016 Lincoln Continental
2017 Lincoln Continental
2017 Lincoln Continental
2017 Lincoln Continental
2017 Lincoln Continental
2018 Lincoln Continental
2018 Lincoln Continental
2019 Lincoln Continental
2019 Lincoln Continental
In the fall of 2016, after a fourteen-year absence from the Lincoln model line, a new tenth generation Continental went on sale. Previewed by a namesake concept car at the 2015 New York Auto Show, the 2017 Lincoln Continental is the successor of the Lincoln MKS. The Continental is manufactured in Flat Rock, Michigan, alongside the Ford Mustang. This is the first Continental generation since 1958 that is not assembled at the Ford Motor Company Wixom Assembly Plant.

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    Lincoln Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5