2019 Honda Ridgeline

Honda Trucks Through the Years

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A Pictorial Glimpse of Honda Trucks Through the Years

The T360 utilized a 356 cc AK250E series DOHC inline-four cylinder motor also used in the Honda S360 roadster model, with which it likewise shared the chassis. The mid-mounted unit moved the pickup to a top speed of 100 km/h (62 mph). The motor produced 30 hp (22 kW) at 8,500 rpm, mirroring Honda's motorcycle legacy. 108,920 T360s were manufactured from 1963 through August 1967, every single one painted "May Blue". It has a wraparound clamshell-style hood which keeps the headlights in place when opened.

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The first production automobile from Honda was the T360 mini pick-up truck, which went on sale in August 1963. Powered by a small 356-cc straight-4 gasoline engine, it was classified under the cheaper Kei car tax bracket. The first production car from Honda was the S500 sports car, which followed the T360 into production in October 1963. Its chain-driven rear wheels pointed to Honda's motorcycle origins.

The comparable yet to larger Honda T500 utilized a 38 hp (28 kW) 531 cc rendition of the motor, excluding it from the Kei auto class. The T500, was announced in September 1964, was for the most part proposed for export markets. Its motor conveyed high in the rev area (maximum power was achieved at 7,500 rpm, with a 9,000 rpm redline) and was a marginally downtuned variant of the one mounted in the Honda S500 sports car. Top speed was 105 km/h (65 mph). 10,226 T500s were manufactured from 1964 through November 1967, and every one was painted "Greenery Green". Beside the different color and motor, the T500 was 20 cm longer (all of it behind the rear axle), as its general length was not governed by the Kei regulations. Another minor difference was the area for license plates was bigger than those of a Kei automobile, and also a larger 400 kg (882 lb) load capacity.

Honda Trucks (Pickups)

Honda T360/TN360 (1963-1967)

1963 Honda T360 Truck
1963 Honda T360 Truck
The T360 was manufactured as a traditional rear wheel drive truck, a flatbed (the T360F), flatbed with fold down sides (the T360H), and as a van (the T360V). There was additionally a form of the T360 called the "Snow Crawler", furnished with tracked drive units at the back. Because of its cost, the Snow Crawler remained a rare notwithstanding its convenience in certain areas of northern Japan. The T500 was produced either with a regular pickup body (T500), or with the fold down sides flatbed, this time with the "F" suffix; labeled the T500F.

Honda T500 (1964-1967)

1964 Honda T500 Truck
1964 Honda T500 Truck
The T360's big brother, the T500, was produced from September1964 to November1967. It was available in two body styles; a conventional pick up bed, and the T500F, shown here, with the flatbed and sides that fold down in addition to the tailgate

Honda N600 (1964-1972)

1971 Honda 600 Truck
1971 Honda 600 Truck
The N600 was introduced to the United States in 1969 as a 1970 model, and was the first Honda automobile to be officially imported to the United States. It was technologically advanced for its time, with an all alloy engine that could achieve 9000 rpm. Engine output was 36–45 hp (27–34 kW) and the N600 was capable of 81 mph (130 km/h). The lower-powered engine arrived in 1972; with milder cams and lowered compression it gave up some peak power and torque, while allowing for a less peaky delivery and higher drivability. It delivered surprisingly peppy performance because of its light weight (around 1100 pounds), due to compact dimensions and some plastic parts (like the boot lid). The brakes on early models were very weak, despite having front discs and servo assistance. Rear suspension was a dead axle on leaf springs.

Honda Acty (1977-present)

1989 Honda Acty Truck
1989 Honda Acty Truck
The Acty range is designed to be economical, agile work vehicles, and generally lack luxury options, although air conditioning and power steering are available along with various trim, decoration, and customization options. The first generation was produced from 1977 to 1988 (model series TA, TB, TC, VD, VH), the second generation's years were 1988-1999 (model series HA1, HA2, HH1, HH2 with the E05A engine; HA3, HA4, HA5, HH3, HH4 with the EN07A engine - the Street continued in production until 2011) and the third generation's years were 1999-2009 (model series HA6, HA7, HH5, HH6 with E07Z engine) with the van still in production. The fourth generation was introduced, as a truck only, at the 41st Tokyo Motor Show in 2009 on December 17, showing the HA8 series and continuing to use the E07Z engine.

Honda Ridgeline (2006-present)

2006 Honda Ridgeline RTS
2006 Honda Ridgeline RTS
2017 Honda Ridgeline
2017 Honda Ridgeline
2019 Honda Ridgeline
2019 Honda Ridgeline
The Honda Ridgeline is a sport utility truck. The unibody construction, features independent suspension, a flat load floor, a double action tailgate, an In-Bed Trunk, all-wheel drive — and additionally front-wheel drive for select 2017 US versions—, and is only available in a crewcab short bed design, dissimilar to most pickups. It was released for sale in March 2005 as a 2006 model and initially manufactured by Honda of Canada until 2008 when the assembly was relocated to Honda of Alabama. Production of the original Honda Ridgeline wound down in mid-2014. Despite its low sales units, the Ridgeline was one of the more profitable Honda vehicles In 2013, Honda reported that an redesigned second era Ridgeline would be built and following a two year generation rest, in late June of 2016, a recently updated Ridgeline was available as a 2017 model year vehicle.

In a statement by Honda, the Ridgeline was not intended to take sales from the more customary pickups sold in the U.S., yet was produced to "provide the 18% of Honda owners who also have pickups an opportunity to make their garages a Honda-only area". The original Ridgeline was a remarkably built vehicle with just 7% of its parts shared with Honda's worldwide light truck platform and 5% of it's exterior components shared. Its powertrain is similar to the one in the 2006 Acura MDX although was vigorously modified for towing and hauling The second era Ridgeline adopted an alternate engineering, taking after the 2016 Honda Pilot and changing the parts important to support truck type activities, while keeping the features that made the original Ridgeline unique.

Honda Suv's

Honda Pilot (2002-present)

Honda Pilot generation 1 (2002-2008)

2002 Honda Pilot
2002 Honda Pilot
2005 Honda Pilot
2005 Honda Pilot
2008 Honda Pilot
2008 Honda Pilot
The Honda Pilot is a mid-size crossover SUV manufactured by Honda and introduced in 2002. Primarily aimed at the North American market, the Pilot is the largest SUV from Honda and features three-row seating. Pilots are currently manufactured in Lincoln, Alabama, and the Pilot was produced in Alliston, Ontario until April 2007. The first generation Pilot was released in April 2002 as a 2003 model. The Pilot shares its platform with the Acura MDX, as well as the Odyssey minivan and the Accord sedan. The Pilot's unibody construction and independent suspension are designed to provide handling similar to that of a car, and it has integrated perimeter frame rails to allow towing and light off-road use.

Honda Pilot generation 2 (2009–2015)

2009 Honda Pilot
2009 Honda Pilot
2010 Honda Pilot
2010 Honda Pilot
2014 Honda Pilot
2014 Honda Pilot
The larger second generation Pilot was unveiled as a prototype in January 2008 at the North American International Auto Show. Assembled at Honda Manufacturing of Alabama in Lincoln, Alabama, it was offered in five trims; LX, EX, EX-L, Touring, and SE (2015 only). All second generation Pilots used a new J35Z4 3.5-liter V6 iVTEC engine producing 250 hp (186 kW; 253 PS) SAE net at 5700 rpm and 253 lb⋅ft (343 N⋅m) of torque at 4800 rpm. EPA fuel economy is rated at 17 mpg city /23 mpg highway with front-wheel-drive and 16 mpg city / 22 mpg highway for all-wheel-drive.

Honda Pilot generation 3 (2016–present)

2016 Honda Pilot
2016 Honda Pilot
2017 Honda Pilot
2017 Honda Pilot
2019 Honda Pilot
2019 Honda Pilot
The third-generation 2016 Pilot debuted at the Chicago Auto Show in February 2015, production began during May, and was made available for sale in June. The exterior is sleeker in appearance compared to its boxier predecessor. Added to the exterior are optional LED headlamps with automatic high-low beam switching, LED daytime running lights (DRLs), and LED brake tail lights and the new Elite model. New features also include heated rear seats, ventilated front seats, and a panoramic roof to Elite models only. Alloy wheels became standard.

Honda CR-V (1995-present)

The Honda CR-V is a compact crossover SUV manufactured by Honda since 1995 and introduced in the North American market in 1997. It uses the Honda Civic platform with an SUV body design. The CR-V is Honda's mid-range utility vehicle, slotting between the smaller HR-V and the larger Pilot. Honda states "CR-V” stands for "Comfortable Runabout Vehicle" while the term "Compact Recreational Vehicle" is used in a British car review article that was republished by Honda.

Honda CR-V - generation 1 (1995-2001)

1995 Honda CR-V
1995 Honda CR-V
1996 Honda CR-V
1996 Honda CR-V
2001 Honda CR-V
2001 Honda CR-V
The CR-V (Chassis Code RD1-RD3) was Honda's first in-house designed sport utility vehicle by Hiroyuki Kawase. The CR-V was introduced in Japan at Honda Verno dealerships only and was regarded as a luxury vehicle in Japan due to the exterior width dimensions exceeding Japanese Government dimension regulations. For North American market, it was displayed at the 1996 Chicago Auto Show and went on sale in February 1997.

Honda CR-V - generation 2 (2002-2006)

2002 Honda CR-V
2002 Honda CR-V
2004 Honda CR-V
2004 Honda CR-V
2006 Honda CR-V
2006 Honda CR-V
The bigger and heavier second generation CR-V (Chassis Code RD4-RD8) was a full redesign, based on the seventh generation Civic, and powered by the K24A1 engine. North American versions of the new engine produced 160 hp and 162 lb⋅ft of torque.

Honda CR-V - generation 3 (2007-2011)

2007 Honda CR-V
2007 Honda CR-V
2008 Honda CR-V
2008 Honda CR-V
2011 Honda CR-V
2011 Honda CR-V
The third generation CR-V went on sale in the U.S. in late September 2006 for the 2007 model year. Unlike preceding models it features a rear lift gate rather than a side-opening rear door and no longer has the spare tire mounted on the rear door.

Honda CR-V - generation 4 (2012-2016)

2014 Honda CR-V
2014 Honda CR-V
2012 Honda CR-V
2012 Honda CR-V
2016 Honda CR-V
2016 Honda CR-V
The production 2012 CR-V debuted at the 2011 Los Angeles Auto Show.The CR-V went on sale in the U.S. on December 15, 2011. In some European countries, the fourth generation model is still being sold. It is powered with a 2.4-liter i-VTEC inline-four engine that puts out 185 hp and 163 pound-feet (220Nm ) of torque at 4,400 rpm along with an all-new Real-Time all-wheel-drive (AWD) with intelligent control system. All North American Honda CR-Vs come equipped with a 5-speed automatic transmission.

Honda CR-V - generation 5 (2017-present)

2018 Honda CR-V
2018 Honda CR-V
2019 Honda CR-V
2019 Honda CR-V
LED daytime-running lights, 18" Alloy Wheels, and electronic parking brake with a new auto-hold feature, are now standard on EX and up trim levels. Additional, new features include a power lift-gate, active grille shutter system to reduce aerodynamic drag, Android Auto/Apple CarPlay on an updated 7-inch touch screen display with volume knob, 7-inch TFT instrument display and LED headlights.

Honda HR-V (1998-2006)

The Honda HR-V is a subcompact crossover SUV produced by Honda spanning two generations. The first generation HR-V was based on the Honda Logo and sold in Europe, Japan and selective Asia-Pacific markets between 1999 and 2006. The second generation HR-V is based on the third-generation Honda Fit and went on sale in North America, Australia, Brazil, and selective Asian markets in 2015. The second generation HR-V is largely identical to the JDM Vezel which went on sale in late 2013.

Honda Element (2003-2011)

2003 Honda Element
2003 Honda Element
2008 Honda Element
2008 Honda Element
2011 Honda Element
2011 Honda Element
The Honda Element is a compact crossover SUV manufactured by Honda using a modified CR-V platform and marketed in North America over a single generation for model years 2003-2011. Manufactured in East Liberty, Ohio, the Element was offered with front-wheel or all-wheel drive — and was noted for its boxy exterior styling with bi-parting side doors and its boxy, flexible interior layout.

Honda Passport (1998-2002, 2018-present)

1999 Honda Passport
1999 Honda Passport
2002 Honda Passport
2002 Honda Passport
2019 Honda Passport
2019 Honda Passport
The Honda Passport is a line of sport utility vehicles (SUV). Originally, it is a badge engineered version of the Isuzu Rodeo, a mid-size SUV to be sold between 1993 and 2002. It was introduced in 1993 for the 1994 model year as Honda's first entry into the growing SUV market of the 1990s in the United States. In November 2018, Honda announced that the Passport nameplate will return as a two-row mid-size crossover SUV slotted between the CR-V and Pilot. The third-generation Passport was unveiled at the Los Angeles Auto Show on November 27, 2018. It is built at the Lincoln, Alabama factory, and available for the 2019 model year

Honda XR-V (2017-present)

2018 Honda XR-V
2018 Honda XR-V
The Honda XR-V mini SUV is a variant of the Japanese Honda Vezel and North American, European, Asian and South American Honda HR-V sold exclusively in China under the Dongfeng-Honda joint venture. The Honda XR-V comes with a completely different front end and backend design to differ from the Honda Vezel sold by Guangqi Honda, including a restyled front grille with the Honda solid winged face trademark and a set restyled taillights connected horizontally to each other. The Honda XR-V is positioned under the Honda CR-V also sold under the Dongfeng-Honda joint venture and based on the same platform as the Vezel/ HR-V, WR-V and Jazz/ Fit.

Honda WR-V (2016-present)

2017 Honda WR-V
2017 Honda WR-V
2018 Honda WR-V
2018 Honda WR-V
2019 Honda WR-V
2019 Honda WR-V
The Honda WR-V is a subcompact crossover produced by Honda. It has the same body structure as the third generation Fit/Jazz with different front and hood treatment. It was introduced at the 2016 São Paulo International Motor Show. The WR-V was built and sold specifically for the South American and Indian market. The abbreviation WR-V stands for Winsome Runabout Vehicle and is currently marketed as the ‘WOW-RV’ in the official Indian TV commercial. The WR-V was launched in the Indian car market on March 16, 2017 at a starting price of Rs 7.75 lakh (ex-showroom). The vehicle is inspired from its hatchback sibling, Jazz, and shares the same platform.

Honda Vans

Honda Odyssey (1995–present)

Honda Odyssey generation 1 (1995–1998)

1995 Honda Odyssey
1995 Honda Odyssey
1998 Honda Odyssey
1998 Honda Odyssey
The Honda Odyssey is a minivan manufactured and marketed by Honda since 1994, now in its fifth generation. The Odyssey had originally been conceived and engineered in Japan, in the wake of the country's economic crisis of the 1990s – which in turn imposed severe constraints on the vehicle's size and overall concept, dictating the minivan's manufacture in an existing facility with minimal modification. The result was a smaller minivan, in the Compact MPV class, that was well received in the Japanese domestic market and less well received in North America. The first generation Odyssey was marketed in Europe as the Honda Shuttle.

Honda Odyssey generation 2 (1999–2004)

1999 Honda Odyssey
1999 Honda Odyssey
2004 Honda Odyssey
2004 Honda Odyssey
By its second generation, the Odyssey was considerably larger than its predecessor, and adopted the Chrysler style minivan format, with sliding rear doors instead of hinged ones, simpler front strut suspension in place of upper and lower control arm front suspension of the 1995-1998 model and a 210 hp V6 engine instead of the original, four-cylinder.

Honda Odyssey generation 3 (2005–2010)

2005 Honda Odyssey
2005 Honda Odyssey
2010 Honda Odyssey
2010 Honda Odyssey
Honda introduced the third-generation Odyssey for the 2005 model year. It grew in width and weight but retained the previous generation's length and interior space. Honda introduced the ACE body engineering to the third-generation Odyssey, which was later used on the eighth generation Civic. Side-curtain airbags and electronic stability control are included in all models. Both features were previously unavailable.

Honda Odyssey generation 4 (2011–2017)

2011 Honda Odyssey
2011 Honda Odyssey
2017 Honda Odyssey
2017 Honda Odyssey
Honda presented the 2011 Odyssey Concept in early 2010 at the Chicago Auto Show and officially on June 17; with a larger, wider body, a lower roofline and revised styling. A Touring Elite model became available. Compared to its predecessor, the fourth generation Honda Odyssey is 0.8 in (20 mm) longer, 2.1 in (53 mm) wider and 0.4 in (10 mm) - 0.6 in (15 mm) lower. The body is constructed using 59% high strength steel, ranging from 390-1,500 MPa yield strength. Available trim levels initially included the LX, EX, EX-L, Touring and Touring Elite.

Honda Odyssey generation 5 (2018–present)

2018 Honda Odyssey
  2018 Honda Odyssey
2019 Honda Odyssey
2019 Honda Odyssey
Compared to its predecessor, the fifth generation Honda Odyssey is 0.3 in (8 mm) longer, 0.7 in (18 mm) narrower, 1.2 in (30 mm) taller and share the same 118.1 in (3 m) wheelbase. The body is constructed using ultra-high-strength steel, aluminum and magnesium that minimizes weight to up to 75 lb (34 kg) and improves body rigidity up to 44% from the previous generation. Available trim levels follow the outgoing model in the LX, EX, EX-L, Touring, and Touring Elite trims.

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    Honda Trucks Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5