Graham Paige Motor Cars Through the Years


A Pictorial Glimpse of Graham Paige Motor Cars

Graham-Paige was an American automobile manufacturer founded by brothers Joseph B. Graham (September 12, 1882–July 1970), Robert C. Graham (August 1885–October 3, 1967), and Ray A. Graham (May 28, 1887–August 13, 1932) in 1927. Automobile production ceased in 1940, and its automotive assets were acquired by Kaiser-Frazer in 1947. As a corporate entity, the Graham-Paige name continued until 1962.

Graham Videos

Graham Brothers (1919-1925)

1927 Dodge Graham Truck

927 Dodge Graham Truck
After successful involvement in a glass manufacturing company (eventually sold to Libbey Owens Ford, brothers Joseph B., Robert C., and Ray A. Graham began in 1919 to produce kits to modify Ford Model Ts and TTs into trucks. That led to the brothers building their trucks using engines of various manufacturers and the Graham Brothers brand. Eventually they settled on Dodge engines, and soon the trucks were sold by Dodge dealers.

Graham Truck Plamt Stockton Ca, 1920
Graham Truck Plamt Stockton Ca, 1920
The Grahams expanded from beginnings in Evansville, Indiana, opening plants in 1922 on Meldrum Avenue in Detroit, Michigan, of 13,000 square feet, and in 1925 on Cherokee Lane in Stockton, California. The Canadian market was supplied by the Canadian Dodge plant. Dodge purchased the Graham Brothers truck firm in 1925, and the three Graham brothers took on executive positions at Dodge.

The Graham Brothers brand lasted until 1929, Chrysler Corporation having taken over Dodge in 1928.

Graham-Paige (1927-1947)

1928 Graham-Paige 619 2 door phaeton
1928 Graham-Paige 619 2 door phaeton
1929 Graham-Paige 827 Sedan
1929 Graham-Paige 827 Sedan
1930 Graham-Paige 612 Business Coupe
1930 Graham-Paige 612 Business Coupe
1931 Graham Model 46 Roadster
1931 Graham Model 46 Roadster
1932 Graham Blue Streak
1932 Graham Blue Streak
1933 Graham-Paige 6 Cylinder Sedan
1933 Graham-Paige 6 Cylinder Sedan
1934 Graham Eight convertible
1934 Graham Eight convertible
1935 Graham Coupe
1935 Graham Coupe
1936 Graham Cavalier
1936 Graham Cavalier
1937 Graham Sedan
1937 Graham Sedan
1938 Graham 97 Supercharged Cabriolet
1938 Graham 97 Supercharged Cabriolet
1939 Graham 97 Supercharged Sedan
1939 Graham 97 Supercharged Sedan
Initially, Graham-Paige withstood the onset of the depression well, but sales fell as the decade wore on. The 1932 models were designed by Amos Northup. This particular design has been noted as the "single most influential design in automotive history." The new 8-cylinder engine was called the "Blue Streak." However, the press and public quickly adopted the name "Blue Streak" for the cars themselves. The design introduced a number of innovative ideas. The most copied was the enclosed fenders, thus covering the mud and grime built up on the underside. The radiator cap was moved under the hood, which itself was later modified to cover the cowl, and end at the base of the windshield.

1940 Graham 108 Spirit of Motion 'Sharknose'
1940 Graham 108 Spirit of Motion "Sharknose"
1941 Graham Hollywood
1941 Graham Hollywood
Desperate for a return to market strength, on February 8, 1938, Hupmobile acquired the production dies of the Gordon Buehrig-designed Cord 810, paying US $900,000 for the tooling. Hupmobile hoped using the striking Cord design in a lower-priced conventional car, called the Skylark, would return the company to financial health. Enthusiastic orders came in by the thousands, but production delays soured customer support. Desperate for a winning offering and unable to retool, Graham made a deal with the ailing Hupp Motor Co. in late 1939. According to the deal, the faltering company entered into an arrangement with Hupmobile to build cars based on the body dies of the stunning Gordon Buehrig-designed Cord 810/812. In an effort to remain in business, Hupp had acquired the Cord dies, but lacked the financial resources to build the car. Hupp's Skylark was priced at US $895, and only about 300 were built.

Hupmobile (1909-1939)

1941 Hupmobile Skylark
1941 Hupmobile Skylark
Graham agreed to build the Hupmobile Skylark on a contract basis, while receiving the rights to use the distinctive Cord dies to produce a similar car of its own, to be called the Hollywood. The striking Skylark/Hollywood differed from the Cord from the cowl forward with a redesigned hood, front fenders and conventional headlights, achieved by automotive designer John Tjaarda of Lincoln-Zephyr fame. The Cord's longer hood was not needed, as the Hupp and Graham versions were rear-wheel drive. This also necessitated modifying the floor to accept a driveshaft. Graham chose the four-door Beverly sedan shape for the Hollywood rather than the two-door convertible, as they wanted the Hollywood to be a popular, mass-market car.

The company suspended manufacturing in September 1940, only to reopen its plant for military production for World War II. n August 1945, Graham-Paige announced plans to resume production under the Graham name, but the plan never materialized. On February 5, 1947, Graham-Paige stockholders approved the transfer of all their automotive assets to Kaiser-Frazer, an automobile company formed by Frazer and Kaiser, in return for 750,000 shares of Kaiser-Frazer stock and other considerations. Graham's manufacturing facilities on Warren Avenue were sold to Chrysler,

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GRaham Paige Automobiles Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5