2020 Ford Mustang EcoBoost

Ford Motor Cars Through the Years

Mid Size Ford Motor Cars Through the Years

Henry Ford
Henry Ford 1919

Edsel Ford
Edsel Ford 1921

Ford Motor Company is an American multinational corporation based in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. The automaker was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The organization offers autos and business vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury autos under the Lincoln mark. Ford likewise owns Brazilian SUV maker, Troller, and Australian performance auto producer FPV. In the past it has additionally created tractors and car parts. Ford has a 2.1% stake in Mazda of Japan, a 8% ownership in Aston Martin in the United Kingdom, and a 49% ownership in Jiangling of China. It likewise has various joint-ventures, one such venture in China (Changan Ford Mazda), another in Taiwan (Ford Lio Ho), another in Thailand (AutoAlliance Thailand), another in Turkey (Ford Otosan), and another in Russia (Ford Sollers). Ford is also listed on the New York Stock Exchange and controlled over by the Ford family, in spite of the fact that they have minority proprietorship (however greater part of the voting power).

New "official" size designations in the U.S. were introduced by the EPA, which defined market segments by passenger and cargo space. Formerly mid-sized cars that were built on the same platform, like the AMC Matador sedan, had a combined passenger and cargo volume of 130 cubic feet (3.68 m3), and were now considered "full-size" automobiles.

Mid-size cars were the most popular category of cars sold in the United States, with 27.4 percent during the first half of 2012, ahead of crossovers at 19 percent.

 

Ford Videos

Ford Mid Size

Ford Fairlane (1962-1970)

1962 Ford Fairlane 1962 Ford Fairlane
1963 Ford Fairlane 1963 Ford Fairlane
1964 Ford Fairlane 500 1964 Ford Fairlane 500
1965 Ford Fairlane 500 1965 Ford Fairlane 500
1966 Ford Fairlane 1966 Ford Fairlane
1967 Ford Fairlane 1967 Ford Fairlane
1968 Ford Fairlane 1968 Ford Fairlane
1969 Ford Fairlane 1969 Ford Fairlane
1970 Ford Fairlane 1970 Ford Fairlane
The Ford Fairlane was sold between 1955 and 1970 by Ford in North America. The name is derived from Henry Ford's estate, Fair Lane, near Dearborn, Michigan.

Over time, the name referred to a number of different cars in different classes; the Fairlane was initially a full-sized car, but became a mid-sized car from the 1962 model year. The mid-sized model spawned the Australian-built Fairlane in 1967, although in that market it was considered a large car.

Ford Torino (1968-1976)

1968 Ford Torino
1968 Ford Torino
1969 Ford Torino
1969 Ford Torino
1970 Ford Torino
1970 Ford Torino
1971 Ford Torino
1971 Ford Torino
1972 Ford Gran Torino
1972 Ford Gran Torino
1973 Ford Gran Torino
1973 Ford Gran Torino
1974 Ford Gran Torino
1974 Ford Gran Torino
Starksy & Hutch 1975 Gran Torino
Starksy & Hutch 1975 Gran Torino
1976 Ford Torino
1976 Ford Torino
The Ford Torino produced by Ford for the North American market between 1968 and 1976. It was a competitor in the intermediate market segment. The car was named after the city of Turin (Torino, in Italian), considered "the Italian Detroit". The Torino was initially an upscale variation of the intermediate sized Ford Fairlane, which Ford produced between 1962 and 1970. After 1968, the Fairlane name was retained for the base models with lower levels of trim than those models which wore the Torino name.

Ford Fairmont (1978-1983)

1978 Ford Fairmont 1978 Ford Fairmont
1979 Ford Fairmont 1979 Ford Fairmont
1980 Ford Fairmont 1980 Ford Fairmont
1982 Ford Fairmont 1982 Ford Fairmont
1983 Ford Fairmont 1983 Ford Fairmont
The mid-size Fairmont was marketed from the 1978 to the 1983 model years. The replacement for the Maverick, the Fairmont was marketed by Mercury as the Zephyr, which was a replacement for the Mercury Comet. Both The Fairmont and Zephyr comprised of two-door notchback sedans, four-door sedans, two door coupes, and five-door station wagons.

Ford Fusion (2006-Current)

2006 Ford Fusion
2006 Ford Fusion
2011 Ford Fusion SEL
2011 Ford Fusion SEL
2012 Ford Fusion SE
2012 Ford Fusion SE
2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid
2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid
2014 Ford Fusion SE
2014 Ford Fusion SE
2015 Ford Fusion
2015 Ford Fusion
2016 Ford Fusion Hybrid
2016 Ford Fusion Hybrid
2017 Ford Fusion
2017 Ford Fusion
2018 Ford Fusion Sport
2018 Ford Fusion Sport
2019 Ford Fusion Hybrid
2019 Ford Fusion Hybrid
The Fusion, a four-door, five passenger medium size sedan built and sold by Ford over two generations in both gas and gas/electric hybrid variations. Released for 2006 model year, the Fusion is fabricated at Ford's Hermosillo Stamping and Assembly plant alongside the rebadged Lincoln MKZ — and in the past with the discontinued rebadged variation, the Mercury Milan, all sharing the CD3 platform.

 

Thunderbird 11 generations (1955-1997),(2002-2005)

Thunderbird began manufacturing for the 1955 model year as a flamboyant two-seat convertible. Dissimilar to the Corvette, it was not promoted as a sports car. The Thunderbird was positioned as an upscale model and is credited in opening up a new market, the personal luxury auto.  The Thunderbird picked up a second row of seats 1n 1958. Subsequent generations got increasingly larger until 1977, when it was scaled back, and again in 1980, and once more in 1983. Sales were great until the 1990s, when big 2-door coupes became unpopular. Manufacturing stopped toward the end of 1997. Thunderbird began once more in 2002, a revived 2-seat version was released, which was accessible towards the 2005 model year end. From its 1955 introduction to its discontinuance in 2005, Ford manufactured more than 4.4 million Thunderbirds. 

Ford Thunderbird generation 1 (1955-1957)

1955 Thunderbird
1955 Ford Thunderbird
1956 Ford Thunderbird
1956 Ford Thunderbird
1957 Ford Thunderbird
1957 Ford Thunderbird
The Ford Thunderbird began life in February 1953 in direct response to Chevrolet's new sports car, the Corvette, which was publicly unveiled in prototype form just a month before. Under rapid development, Production of the Thunderbird began later on in 1954 on September 9 with the car beginning sales as a 1955 model on October 22, 1954. Though sharing some design characteristics with other Fords of the time, such as single, circular headlamps and tail lamps and modest tailfins, the Thunderbird was sleeker and more athletic in shape, and had features like a hood scoop and a 150 mph (240 km/h) speedometer hinting a higher performance nature that other Fords didn't possess.

Ford Thunderbird generation 2 (1958-1960)

1958 Ford Thunderbird
1958 Ford Thunderbird
1959 Ford Thunderbird
1959 Ford Thunderbird
1960 Ford Thunderbird
1960 Ford Thunderbird
Although the 1955–57 Thunderbird was a success, Ford executives—particularly Robert McNamara—were concerned that the car's position as a two-seater limited its sales potential. As a result, the car was redesigned as a four-seater for 1958. The new Thunderbird began a sales momentum previously unseen with the car, selling 200,000 units in three years, four times the result of the two seat model. This success spawned a new market segment, the personal luxury car. It was the first individual model line (as opposed to an entire company) to earn Motor Trend "Car of the Year" honors

Ford Thunderbird generation 3 (1961-1963)

1961 Ford Thunderbird
1961 Ford Thunderbird
1962 Vistabird
1962 Vistabird
1963 Ford Thunderbird
1963 Ford Thunderbird
The Thunderbird was redesigned for 1961 with sleeker styling that gave the car a distinctively bullet-like appearance. A new engine, the 390 cu in FE V8, was the standard and only engine initially offered in the Thunderbird. The V8 produced 300 horsepower and was mated to a 3-speed automatic transmission. The new Thunderbird was immediately well received with 73,051 sold for 1961

Ford Thunderbird generation 4 (1964-1966)

1964 Ford Thunderbird
1964 Ford Thunderbird
1965 Ford Thunderbird. Photo by Fine Art America
1965 Ford Thunderbird
1966 Ford Thunderbird
1966 Ford Thunderbird
For 1964 the Thunderbird was restyled in favor of a more squared-off appearance, which was mostly evident when viewing the car from the side or rear. Hinting at its roots in the previous generation Thunderbird that it evolved from, the new model retained a similar grille design with quad headlights and a 113.2 inches (2,875 mm) wheelbase. As before, the new Thunderbird continued to be offered in hardtop, convertible, and Landau versions. The 300 horsepower 390 cu in FE V8 continued as the standard engine for the Thunderbird. It was paired with a 3-speed automatic transmission.

Ford Thunderbird generation 5 (1967-1971)

1967 Ford Thunderbird
1967 Ford Thunderbird
1968 Ford Thunderbird
1968 Ford Thunderbird
1969 Ford Thunderbird
1969 Ford Thunderbird
1970 Ford Thunderbird
1970 Ford Thunderbird
1971 Ford Thunderbird
1971 Ford Thunderbird
The Thunderbird's fifth generation brought the second major change in the car's design direction since its debut in 1955. From 1958 to 1966, the Thunderbird had remained fundamentally the same in concept as a sporty two-door coupe/convertible with two rows of seating. However, the introduction of the Ford Mustang in early 1964 had created a challenge to the Thunderbird's market positioning for it, like the Thunderbird, was also a two-door coupe/convertible with two rows of seating. Where the Mustang had an advantage was in the point that it was substantially cheaper. To prevent overlap between the two cars, Ford's response was to move the Thunderbird upmarket. The result, introduced for 1967, was a larger Thunderbird with luxury appointments more in line with a Lincoln.

Ford Thunderbird generation 6 (1972-1976)

1972 Ford Thunderbird
1972 Ford Thunderbird
1973 Ford Thunderbird
1973 Ford Thunderbird
1974 Ford Thunderbird
1974 Ford Thunderbird
1975 Ford Thunderbird
1975 Ford Thunderbird
1976 Ford Thunderbird
1976 Ford Thunderbird
The sixth generation Thunderbird debuted in the fall of 1971 as a 1972 model. With a 120.4-inch wheelbase, an overall length of 214 inches (growing to 225 inches by 1974), and a curb weight of 4,420 pounds (over 4,800 pounds when equipped with a 460 cu in V8), it was the largest Thunderbird ever produced by Ford, sharing the assembly line with the Continental Mark IV. Matching the large size of the car were large engines, including a standard 429 cu in V8 and an optional 460 cu in V8 (standard after 1973). Though offering two of the largest displacement V8 engines ever installed in a production vehicle by Ford, the car's considerable weight combined with low horsepower output caused by restrictive emissions technology resulted in modest performance.

Ford Thunderbird generation 7 (1977-1979)

1977 Ford Thunderbird
1977 Ford Thunderbird
1978 Ford Thunderbird
1978 Ford Thunderbird
1979 Ford Thunderbird
1979 Ford Thunderbird
For 1977 the Thunderbird was shifted to the smaller 114 inches (2,896 mm) wheelbase chassis that underpinned the 1972–76 Ford Torino and its replacement, the LTD II which also debuted for 1977. Even with the nearly 8 inches in length from the 1975 Thunderbird (only 1.2 inches 217.7 vs 218.9 from the 2nd model year 1973 of 6th generation) it still looked large to the eye. It was not until the next generation (model year 1980) that there was a dramatic downsizing, from 217.7 to 200.4 inches in length. 1977, saw Ford's first effort at downsizing the Thunderbird, reflecting rising demand for more fuel efficient cars. In essence, this generation was a continuation of the 1974–1976 Ford Elite, Ford's first attempt at competing in the market created by the Pontiac Grand Prix and Chevrolet Monte Carlo. Compared to the previous generation Thunderbird, the new car lost nearly 8 inches of overall length at 217.7 and 900 lbs of weight, although height and width were relatively unchanged

Ford Thunderbird generation 8 (1980-1982)

1980 Ford Thunderbird
1980 Ford Thunderbird
1981 Ford Thunderbird
1981 Ford Thunderbird
1982 Ford Thunderbird
1982 Ford Thunderbird
Reflecting a further industry-wide adoption of smaller vehicle designs in the interest of improved fuel efficiency and emissions compliance, the Thunderbird was redesigned for 1980 on the compact Ford Fox platform, which first appeared only two years prior as the basis for the Ford Fairmont. Compared to the previous Torino-based Thunderbird and its large 114 inches wheelbase and 217.7 inches overall length, the new Thunderbird lost 5.6 inches of wheelbase and 17.3 inches in overall length. The squarish styling seen in the previous generation Thunderbird was favored for the new model, but the small car platform resulted in a poor translation with a distinctly upright appearance.

Ford Thunderbird generation 9 (1983-1988)

1983 Ford Thunderbird
1983 Ford Thunderbird
1984 Ford Thunderbird
1984 Ford Thunderbird
1985 Ford Thunderbird
1985 Ford Thunderbird
1986 Ford Thunderbird
1986 Ford Thunderbird
1987 Ford Thunderbird
1987 Ford Thunderbird
1988 Ford Thunderbird
1988 Ford Thunderbird
Even though Ford was already at work on the next Thunderbird generation by 1986, the company sought to continue to cash in on the existing generation's success. As such, for 1987 the Thunderbird received a significant refresh complete with new sheetmetal and a revised front fascia with aerodynamic composite headlamps. Mechanically the car was mostly unchanged. V6s models carried over port fuel injection from 1986 while the Turbo Coupe's turbocharged 4-cylinder engine gained an intercooler, increasing output to 190 horsepower and 240 lbs of torque. 1988 was this Thunderbird generation's last as Ford prepared to unveil an all-new Thunderbird for 1989.

Ford Thunderbird generation 10 (1989-1997)

1989 Ford Thunderbird
1989 Ford Thunderbird
1990 Ford Thunderbird
1990 Ford Thunderbird
1991 Ford Thunderbird
1991 Ford Thunderbird
1992 Ford Thunderbird
1992 Ford Thunderbird
1993 Ford Thunderbird
1993 Ford Thunderbird
1994 Ford Thunderbird
1994 Ford Thunderbird
1995 Ford Thunderbird
1995 Ford Thunderbird
1996 Ford Thunderbird
1996 Ford Thunderbird
1997 Ford Thunderbird
1997 Ford Thunderbird
On December 26, 1988, a completely redesigned Thunderbird was introduced as a 1989 model alongside its sister car, the Mercury Cougar. The new Thunderbird was developed on Ford's MN12 (Mid-Size North American Project 12) platform, which had been in development since 1984. Featuring a nine-inch longer wheelbase than the previous generation Thunderbird and a four-wheel independent suspension, with short-and-long arms (SLA) and a spring strut assembly in the front and multiple links in the rear, the car offered excellent handling and ride quality. Significantly, the 1989 Thunderbird was the first in the car's history not to offer a V8 engine, instead offering two different versions of Ford's 3.8 L Essex OHV V6

Ford Thunderbird generation 11 (2002-2005)

2002 Ford Thunderbird
2002 Ford Thunderbird
2003 Ford Thunderbird
2003 Ford Thunderbird
2004 Ford Thunderbird
2004 Ford Thunderbird
2005 Ford Thunderbird
2005 Ford Thunderbird
After a five year hiatus, Ford introduced a new Thunderbird for 2002. Returning to the original formula for the Thunderbird, the latest version had a two-seat coupe or convertible layout like the first-generation Thunderbird and retrofuturistic styling to match. The eleventh generation Thunderbird was built at Ford's Wixom Assembly Plant and was based on the company's DEW98 platform, which was shared with the Lincoln LS and Jaguar S-Type. Though the Thunderbird's exterior styling was unique relative to its platform mates, the instrument panel, steering wheel and other trim pieces were borrowed from Lincoln LS. Ford decided to make the 2005 model year the Thunderbird's last with no scheduled successor. The last one rolled off the assembly line on July 1, 2005.
Ford Muscle and Pony Cars

Ford Mustang first generation (1964-1973)

1964 Ford Pegasus Mustang Concept
1964 Ford Pegasus Mustang Concept
1965 Ford Mustang
1965 Ford Mustang
1965 Ford Mustang Ronster
1965 Ford Mustang Ronster
1966 Ford Mustang
1966 Ford Mustang
1967 Ford Mustang
1967 Ford Mustang
1967 Ford Mustang Shelby
1967 Ford Mustang Shelby
1968 Ford Mustang
1968 Ford Mustang
1969 Ford Mustang Barn Find
1969 Ford Mustang Barn Find
1970 Ford Parnelli Jones
1970 Ford Parnelli Jones
1971 Ford Mustang Mach I
1971 Ford Mustang Mach I
1972 Ford Mustang
1972 Ford Mustang
1973 Ford Mustang
1973 Ford Mustang
It was claimed that the decision to abandon the two-seat design was in part due to the increase in sales the Thunderbird had seen when enlarged from a two-seater to a 2+2 in 1958. Thus, a four-seat car with full space for the front bucket seats, as originally planned, and a rear bench seat with significantly less space than was common at the time, were standard. A "Fastback 2+2", first manufactured on August 17, 1964, enclosed the trunk space under a sweeping exterior line similar to the second series Corvette Sting Ray and European sports cars such as the Jaguar E-Type coupe.

Ford Mustang second generation (1974-1978)

1974 Ford Mustang II Mach I
1974 Ford Mustang II Mach I
1975 Ford Mustang Cobra II
1975 Ford Mustang Cobra II
1976 Ford Mustang II
1976 Ford Mustang II
1977 Ford Mustang II
1977 Ford Mustang II
1978 Ford Mustang II Ghia
1978 Ford Mustang II Ghia
Lee Iacocca, who had been one of the forces behind the original Mustang, became President of Ford Motor Company in 1970 and ordered a smaller, more fuel-efficient Mustang for 1974. Initially it was to be based on the Ford Maverick, but ultimately was based on the Ford Pinto subcompact. The new model, called the "Mustang II", was introduced on September 21, 1973, two months before the first 1973 oil crisis, and its reduced size allowed it to compete against successful imported sports coupés such as the Japanese Datsun 240Z, Toyota Celica and the European Ford Capri

Ford Mustang third generation (1979-1993)

1979 Ford Mustang II Ghia
1979 Ford Mustang II Ghia
1980 Ford Mustang II
1980 Ford Mustang II
1981 Ford Mustang II
1981 Ford Mustang II
1982 Ford Mustang GT
1982 Ford Mustang GT
1983 Ford Mustang LX
1983 Ford Mustang LX
1984 Ford Mustang LX
1984 Ford Mustang LX
1985 Ford Mustang GT
1985 Ford Mustang GT
1986 Ford Mustang LX
1986 Ford Mustang LX
1987 Ford Mustang LX
1987 Ford Mustang LX
1988 Ford Mustang LX
1988 Ford Mustang LX
1989 Ford Mustang GT
1989 Ford Mustang GT
1990 Ford Mustang GT
1990 Ford Mustang GT
1991 Ford Mustang GT
1991 Ford Mustang GT
1992 Ford Mustang GT
1992 Ford Mustang GT
1993 Ford Mustang GT
1993 Ford Mustang GT
The 1979 Mustang was based on the larger Fox platform (initially developed for the 1978 Ford Fairmont and Mercury Zephyr). The larger body with an increased wheelbase yielded more interior space for four passengers, especially in the back seat, as well as a larger capacity trunk and a bigger engine bay.

Ford Mustang fourth generation (1994-2004)

1994 Ford Mustang Indy 500 Pace Car Replica
1994 Ford Mustang Indy 500 Pace Car Replica
1995 Ford Mustang GTS
1995 Ford Mustang GTS
1996 Ford Mustang GT
1996 Ford Mustang GT
1997 Ford Mustang Cobra
1997 Ford Mustang Cobra
1997 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra
1998 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra
1999 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra
1999 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra
2000 Ford Mustang GT
2000 Ford Mustang GT
2001 Ford Mustang GT
2001 Ford Mustang GT
2002 Ford Cougar ST200
2002 Ford Cougar ST200
2003 Ford Mustang GT
2003 Ford Mustang GT
2004 Ford Mustang GT
2004 Ford Mustang GT
In November 1993, the Mustang debuted its first major redesign in fifteen years. Code-named "SN-95" by the automaker, it was based on an updated version of the rear-wheel drive Fox platform called "Fox-4." The new styling by Patrick Schiavone incorporated several styling cues from earlier Mustangs. For the first time since its introduction 1964, a notchback coupe model was unavailable.

Ford Mustang fifth generation (2005-2014)

2005 Ford Mustang GT
2005 Ford Mustang GT
2006 Ford Mustang
2006 Ford Mustang
2007 Ford Mustang GT
2007 Ford Mustang GT
2008 Ford Mustang Shelby GT 500
2008 Ford Mustang Shelby GT 500
2009 Ford Mustang
2009 Ford Mustang
2010 Ford Mustang GT
2010 Ford Mustang GT
2011 Ford Mustang GT
2011 Ford Mustang GT
Ford 2012 Mustang Boss
2012 Ford Mustang Boss
2012 Ford Mustangs
2012 Ford Mustangs
2013 Ford Mustang GT
2013 Ford Mustang GT
2014 Ford Mustang
2014 Ford Mustang
Ford introduced a re-designed 2005 model year Mustang at the 2004 North American International Auto Show, codenamed "S-197", that was based on the new D2C platform. Developed under the direction of Chief Engineer Hau Thai-Tang, a veteran engineer for Ford's IndyCar program under Mario Andretti, and exterior styling designer Sid Ramnarace, the fifth-generation Mustang's styling echoes the fastback Mustang models of the late-1960s. Ford's senior vice president of design, J Mays, called it "retro-futurism."

Ford Mustang sixth generation (2015-present)

2015 Ford Mustang EcoBoost Gets 310 HP
2015 Ford Mustang EcoBoost Gets 310 HP
2016 Ford Mustang GT
2016 Ford Mustang GT
2017 Ford Mustang GT
2017 Ford Mustang GT
2018 Ford Mustang GT
2018 Ford Mustang GT
2019 Ford Mustang GT
2019 Ford Mustang GT
2020 Ford Mustang GT
2020 Ford Mustang EcoBoost
The Mustang has arguably been Ford's pony car with the most success. Jerry Titus was the winner of the 1965 SCCA Pro B National Championship in a Mustang and the model went ahead to procure Ford the SCCA Trans-Am Championship title in 1966 and again in 1967. Ford again won the Trans-Am Championship in 1970 with Parnelli Jones and George Follmer piloting Boss 302 Mustangs for Bud Moore Engineering. Portage took the 1985 and 1986 IMSA GTO Championship in Mustangs driven by John Jones and Scott Pruett prior to coming back to Trans-Am glory with a title in 1989 with Dorsey Schroeder. Portage commanded Trans-Am in the 1990s with Tommy Kendall winning titles in 1993, 1995, 1996, and 1997 with driver Paul Gentilozzi including another win in 1999. In 2005 the Ford Mustang FR500C won the title in the Rolex Koni Challenge Series in its very first year on the circuit. In 2007 Ford won a triumph in the GT4 European Championship. 2008 was also the first year of the Mustang Challenge to the Miller Cup, a series which pits a entire field of identical built Mustang race autos against each other. Likewise in 2008, Ford won the makers title in the Koni Challenge Series and HyperSport sports car drivers Joe Foster and Steve Maxwell came away with the drivers title with a Mustang GT.

Ford and Michelin collaborated to provide custom engineered tires to Ford's performance vehicle lineup. Ford performance chief Dave Pericak said: "That certainty reaches out from our up and coming racing effort at Le Mans for 2016 with the all-new Ford GT added to the Ford Performance lineup, including Shelby GT350 and F-150 Raptor". Mustang Generations: First generation (1965–1973), Second generation (1974–1978), Third generation (1979–1993), Fourth generation (1994–2004), Fifth generation (2005–2014), Sixth generation (2015–present)

Ford Sports Cars
Ford sports cars have been involved in sports car racing since 1964. Most quite the Ford GT40 won the 24 Hours of Le Mans 4 times during the 1960s and is the only American auto to win overall at this prestigious occasion. Ford likewise won the International Championship for Makes in 1968 with the GT40, a record which stands today as one of the all-time most prominent racing automobiles. Swiss team Matech GT Racing, in a joint effort with Ford Racing, opened another chapter with the Ford GT, Teams title win during the 2008 FIA GT3 European Championship.

Ford Cobra (1993-2004)

1965 Ford Cobra
1965 Ford Cobra
2004 Ford Shelby Cobra Concept
2004 Ford Shelby Cobra Concept
The AC Cobra, sold as the Shelby Cobra in the United States, is an Anglo-American sports car with a Ford V8 engine, produced intermittently in both the UK and the US since 1962.

Ford GT (1964-1969),(2004-2017)

1964 Ford GT 40
1964 Ford GT 40
1967 Ford GT 40
1967 Ford GT 40
2017 Ford GT
2017 Ford GT
2018 Ford GT
2018 Ford GT
2019 Ford GT
2019 Ford GT
The Ford GT is an American mid-engine two-seater sports car manufactured and marketed by Ford for model year 2005 in conjunction with the company's 2003 centenary. The Ford GT began production again from the 2017 model year. The GT recalls Ford's historically significant GT40, a consecutive four-time winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans (1966–1969), including a 1-2-3 finish in 1966.

Ford Concept
Concept cars are often radical in engine or design. Some use non-traditional, exotic, or expensive materials, ranging from paper to carbon fiber to refined alloys. Others have unique layouts, such as gullwing doors, 3 or 5 (or more) wheels, or special abilities not usually found on cars. Because of these often impractical or unprofitable leanings, many concept cars never get past scale models, or even drawings in computer design. Other more traditional concepts can be developed into fully drivable (operational) vehicles with a working drivetrain and accessories. The state of most concept cars lies somewhere in between and does not represent the final product. A very small proportion of concept cars are functional to any useful extent, some cannot move safely at anything above 10 mph

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    Ford Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on Rating: 5