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Mid Size Chevrolet Motor Cars

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A Glimpse of Mid Size Chevrolet Motor Cars

Chevrolet colloquially referred to as Chevy is a division of General Motors.

In the 1970s, the mid-size vehicles most often had wheelbases between 112 inches and 118 inches. A defining moment happened in the late 1970s, when rising fuel expenses and government mileage control regulations brought about shrinking auto size classes. Automakers began moving "full-size" nameplates to smaller platforms. The EPA presented new "official" size U.S. designations, which defined sizes passenger and cargo room. Formerly mid sized autos that were based on the same platform, such as to the AMC Matador vehicle, featured a combined passenger and cargo volume containing 130 cubic feet, and were suddenly viewed as "full-size" automobiles.

Mid Size Chevrolet Videos

Mid-size size vehicles today for the most part offer wheelbases between 105 inches and 110 inches. Another generally utilized definition is that of the EPA, which classifies autos offering between 110 cubic feet and 119 cubic feet of inside volume as being mid-size.

During 2012, mid-size autos were the most popular vehicle category sold in the United States

GM delivered innovations such as unibody construction, independent front suspension, and a single-piece steel roof, GM pushed the envelope by designing a succession of vehicles which included the Chevrolet Corvette, 1949 Buick Roadmaster, and Chevy Bel Air, plus the Cadillac El Dorado in 1959. GM built cars were every bit as fun to drive off in as they were watching drive by.

During World War II GM delivered more products to the Allies than any other automobile company. Former President of GM, William Knudsen was selected in 1940 by President Roosevelt to Chair of the Wartime Office of Production Management and by 1942, GM was 100 percent in production with their Allied war support. GM provided over $12 billion in materials including trucks, airplanes and tanks.

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Midsize

Chevrolet Chevelle (1964-1977)

1964 Chevrolet Chevelle

1964 Chevrolet Chevelle
1976 Chevrolet Chevelle

1967 Chevrolet Chevelle SS
1976 Chevrolet Chevelle

1976 Chevrolet Chevelle
The Chevrolet Chevelle is a mid-sized automobile which was produced by Chevrolet in three generations for the 1964 through 1977 model years. Part of the General Motors (GM) A-Body platform, the Chevelle was one of Chevrolet's most successful nameplates. Body styles include coupes, sedans, convertibles and station wagons. Super Sport versions were produced through the 1973 model year, and Lagunas from 1973 through 1976. After a four-year absence, the El Camino was reintroduced as part of the new Chevelle lineup in 1964. The Chevelle also provided the platform for the Monte Carlo introduced in 1970.

Chevrolet Mailbu (1978-1983)

1978 Chevrolet Mailbu SS

1978 Chevrolet Mailbu SS
1980 Chevrolet Mailbu

1980 Chevrolet Mailbu
1981 Chevrolet Mailbu

1981 Chevrolet Mailbu
1982 Chevrolet Mailbu

1982 Chevrolet Mailbu
1983 Chevrolet Mailbu

1983 Chevrolet Mailbu
For the 1978 model year, the Malibu name, which had been the bestselling badge in the lineup, replaced the Chevelle name. This was Chevrolet's second downsized nameplate, following the lead of the 1977 Chevrolet Caprice. The Chevrolet Malibu is a mid-size car manufactured and marketed by Chevrolet from 1964 to 1983 and since 1997. The Malibu began as a trim-level of the Chevrolet Chevelle, becoming its own model line in 1978. Originally a rear-wheel-drive intermediate, GM revived the Malibu nameplate as a front-wheel-drive car in 1997.

Chevrolet Mailbu (1997-present)

2008 Chevrolet Malibu LT
2008 Chevrolet Malibu LT
2001 Chevrolet Malibu
2001 Chevrolet Malibu
2017 Chevelle SS
2017 Chevelle SS
2018 Chevrolet Malibu
2018 Chevrolet Malibu
2019 Chevrolet Malibu
2019 Chevrolet Malibu
A new front-wheel drive Malibu was introduced for the 1997 model year on an extended wheelbase version of the GM N platform shared with the Buick Skylark, Oldsmobile Achieva, Oldsmobile Alero, and Pontiac Grand Am as a competitor to the perennial stalwarts the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry which were the best sellers in the midsize market.

Chevrolet Celebrity (1982-1990)

1982 Chevrolet Celebrity
1982 Chevrolet Celebrity
1987 Chevrolet Celebrity
1987 Chevrolet Celebrity
1990 Chevrolet Celebrity
1990 Chevrolet Celebrity
The Chevrolet Celebrity was produced by Chevrolet for the 1982 to 1990 model years, a single generation of the Celebrity was produced, replacing the Malibu as the mid-size Chevrolet model range. During the early 1960s, the nameplate was first used by Oldsmobile for the pillared sedan version of the Oldsmobile 88.

Chevrolet Lumina (1990-2001)

1990 Chevrolet Lumina
1990 Chevrolet Lumina
1998 Chevrolet Lumina LTZ
1998 Chevrolet Lumina LTZ
2001 Chevrolet Lumina
2001 Chevrolet Lumina
Chevrolet Lumina is a nameplate that was used by Chevrolet from 1990 to 2001. As the Chevrolet division sought to consolidate its mid-size nameplates under a single product range, the Lumina was offered as a two-door coupe and a four-door sedan; a mechanically unrelated minivan was produced under the Chevrolet Lumina APV nameplate.

Compact Chevrolets

Compact Chevrolets (1960-present)

Compact Chevrolets

Personal / Luxury Chevrolets

Chevrolet Monte Carlo generation 1 (1970-1972)

1970 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1970 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1971 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1971 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1972 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1972 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
The Chevrolet Monte Carlo is a two-door coupe manufactured and marketed by Chevrolet from 1970 to 2007 model years (non-continuously), encompassing six generations. Chevrolet marketed the Monte Carlo as a personal luxury car, with the last generation classified as a full-sized coupé.

Chevrolet Monte Carlo generation 2 (1973–1977)

1973 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1973 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1974 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1974 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1975 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1975 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1976 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1976 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1977 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1977 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
A redesigned Monte Carlo was introduced alongside other GM intermediates. Like other GM mid-size cars, the 1973 Monte Carlo was no longer a hardtop, but a pillared coupe with rear side opera windows and frameless door glass. Prominent styling features included an egg-crate grille with a Monte Carlo emblem in front and vertical taillights above the bumper. The front bumper was a large federally mandated 5 mph (8.0 km/h) bumper that was among the required 1973 federal safety standards for all passenger cars sold in the U.S. with the 5 mph requirement extended to rear bumpers on 1974 models.

Chevrolet Monte Carlo generation 3 (1978–1980)

1978 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1978 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1979 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1979 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1980 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1980 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
All GM intermediate-sized cars including the Monte Carlo were downsized for the 1978 model year in response to the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo and CAFE requirements. The 1978 model was 700-800 lb lighter and some 15 inches shorter than the 1977 model. The 1978 model also had more interior and trunk space than the earlier 1977 model.

Chevrolet Monte Carlo generation 4 (1981–1988)

1981 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1981 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1984 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1984 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1986 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1986 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1987 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
1987 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
1988 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
1988 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
The body was restyled with the other GM mid-size formal coupes (Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, Pontiac Grand Prix, Buick Regal). It featured a smoother profile than the previous models and new vertical taillights similar to the 1973–1977 models. Engine offerings were carried over, including the standard 229 CID Chevrolet V6 (231 CID Buick V6 in California) an optional 267 CID V8 (not available in California),

Chevrolet Monte Carlo generation 5 (1995–1999)

1995 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1995 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1996 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1996 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1997 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1997 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1998 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1998 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1999 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
1999 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
For the 1995 model year, the mid-size Lumina was split into two models with the sedan continuing as the Lumina and the coupe reviving the Monte Carlo nameplate for its fifth generation. The new car rode on an updated W-body chassis shared with the Lumina, Pontiac Grand Prix, Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, Oldsmobile Intrigue, Buick Century and Buick Regal, and by its nature was the first front-wheel drive Monte Carlo.

Chevrolet Monte Carlo generation 6 (2000–2007)

2000 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
2000 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
2002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
2002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
2007 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
2007 Chevrolet Monte Carlo
For 2000, Chevrolet not only again called upon GM Motorsports for design inspiration, but also to Monte Carlos of the past. Among the traits carried over from older Monte Carlos were the stylized wheel flares, vertically oriented tail lamps, and a stylized rear bumper. Another classic trait for 2000 was the return of the "knight" badging, as well as a full gauge cluster, not seen on the Monte Carlo since 1988. Back again was the Super Sport moniker, replacing the Z34 designation of the fifth generation, which was a Lumina Coupe legacy. Chevrolet also retired the Lumina name, bringing back the Impala nameplate for the Monte Carlo's sedan counterpart.

Chevrolet Muscle Cars

Chevrolet Camaro (1967-2002, 2010-present)

The Chevrolet Camaro is an American automobile manufactured by Chevrolet, classified as a pony car and some versions also as a muscle car. It went on sale on September 29, 1966, for the 1967 model year and was designed as a competing model to the Ford Mustang. The car shared its platform and major components with the Pontiac Firebird, also introduced for 1967. Four distinct generations of the Camaro were developed before production ended in 2002. The nameplate was revived on a concept car that evolved into the fifth-generation Camaro; production started on March 16, 2009.

Chevrolet Camaro generation 1 (1967-1969)

1967 Chevrolet Camero RS Z28
1967 Chevrolet Camero RS Z28
1968 Chevrolet Camero SS
1968 Chevrolet Camero SS
1969 Chevrolet Camero ZL1
1969 Chevrolet Camero ZL1
The first-generation Camaro debuted in September 1966, for the 1967 model year, up to 1969 on a new rear-wheel drive GM F-body platform and was available as a two-door coupé or convertible with 2+2 seating, and a choice of 230 cu in (3.8 L), 250 cu in (4.1 L) inline-6 or 302 cu in (4.9 L), 307 cu in (5.0 L), 327 cu in (5.4 L), 350 cu in (5.7 L), and 396 cu in (6.5 L) V8 power plants.

Chevrolet Camaro generation 2 (1970-1981)

1970 Chevrolet Camero SS
1970 Chevrolet Camero SS
1972 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1972 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1979 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1979 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1980 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1980 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1981 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1981 Chevrolet Camero Z28
Introduced in February 1970, the second-generation Camaro was produced through the 1981 model year, with cosmetic changes made in 1974 and 1978 model years. The car was heavily restyled and became somewhat larger and wider with the new styling. Still based on the F-body platform, the new Camaro was similar to its predecessor, with a unibody structure, front subframe, an A-arm front suspension, and leaf springs to control the solid rear axle.

Chevrolet Camaro generation 3 (1982-1992)

1982 Chevrolet Camero Berlinetta
1982 Chevrolet Camero Berlinetta
1983 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1983 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1984 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1984 Chevrolet Camero Z28
1985 Chevrolet Camero IROC Z
1985 Chevrolet Camero IROC Z
1992 Chevrolet Camero Berlinetta
1992 Chevrolet Camero
The third-generation Camaro was produced from 1981 (for the 1982 model year) to 1992. These were the first Camaros to offer modern fuel injection, Turbo-Hydramatic 700R4 four-speed automatic transmissions, five-speed manual transmissions, 14,15- or 16-inch wheels, a standard OHV 4-cylinder engine, and hatchback bodies. The cars were nearly 500 pounds lighter than the second generation model.

Chevrolet Camaro generation 4 (1993-2002)

1993 Chevrolet Camero Pace Car
1993 Chevrolet Camero Pace Car
1994 Chevrolet Camero
1994 Chevrolet Camero
1995 Chevrolet Camero
1995 Chevrolet Camero
1996 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
1996 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
1997 Chevrolet Camaro SS SLP,
1997 Chevrolet Camaro SS SLP,
1998 Chevrolet Camaro LS!
1998 Chevrolet Camaro LS!
1999 Chevrolet Camaro
1999 Chevrolet Camaro
2000 Chevrolet Camaro SS
2000 Chevrolet Camaro SS
2001 Chevrolet Camaro
2001 Chevrolet Camaro
2002 Chevrolet Camero
2002 Chevrolet Camero
The fourth-generation Camaro debuted in 1993 on an updated F-body platform. It retained the same characteristics since its introduction in 1967: a coupé body style with 2+2 seating (with an optional T-top roof) or convertible (reintroduced in 1994), rear-wheel drive, pushrod 6-cylinder and V8 engines. The standard powerplant from 1993-1995 was a 3.4 L V6, then a 3.8 L V6 was introduced in 1995. A 350 MPFI (LT1) Small Block V-8 engine, which was introduced in the Corvette in 1992, was standard in the Z28.

Chevrolet Camaro generation 5 (2010-2015)

2010 Chevrolet Camaro
2010 Chevrolet Camaro
2011 Chevrolet Camero
2011 Chevrolet Camaro
2012 Chevrolet Camero EU
2012 Chevrolet Camero EU
2013 Camaro Inferno Orange ZL1 Convertible
2013 Camaro Inferno Orange ZL1 Convertible
2014 Chevrolet Camaro 2SS Coupe
2014 Chevrolet Camaro 2SS Coupe
2015 Chevrolet Camaro SS 1LE
2015 Chevrolet Camaro SS 1LE
The Camaro received a complete redesign and new platform in 2009 for the 2010 model year and fifth generation. Based on the 2006 Camaro Concept and 2007 Camaro Convertible Concept, production of the fifth-generation Camaro was approved on August 10, 2006. The Oshawa Car Assembly plant in the city of Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, began producing the new Camaro which went on sale in spring of 2009 as a 2010 model year vehicle

Chevrolet Camaro generation 6 (2016-present)

2016 Chevrolet Camero SS
2016 Chevrolet Camero SS
2017 Chevrolet Camaro 1LE
2017 Chevrolet Camaro 1LE
2018 Chevy Camaro ZL1 1LE
2018 Chevy Camaro ZL1 1LE
2019 Chevrolet Camero 1LE
2019 Chevrolet Camero 1LE
On May 16, 2015, Chevrolet introduced the sixth generation Camaro at Belle Isle park in Detroit. The launch, complete with previous generation Camaros on display, coincided with the vehicle's upcoming 50th birthday. The sixth generation Camaro sales began in late 2015 and offered in LT and SS models built on the GM Alpha platform at Lansing Grand River Assembly in Michigan The Alpha platform is currently used by the Cadillac ATS. The 2016 Camaro weighs 200 lbs less than its predecessor. Over 70% of the sixth generation's architectural components are unique to the car and are not shared with any other current GM product. Motor Trend named the 2016 Camaro its "Car of the Year.

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1969 Chevrolet Nova Scale Model Shown
1969 Chevrolet Nova Scale Model Shown
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    Mid Size Chevrolet Motor Cars Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5