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Compact Chevrolet Motor Cars

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A Glimpse of Compact Chevrolet Motor Cars

Current compact car sizes, defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and global models individually, is roughly 161 in and 175 in long for hatchbacks, and 173 in 187 in for convertibles, cars or station wagons. Multi-purpose vehicles and sport utility vehicles based upon small family autos (typically called compact MPVs and compactr SUVs) have comparable sizes, going from 165 in to 177 in in the U.S., and from 173 in to 185 in on global based models.

A compact auto is a to a great extent North American term signifying a car smaller than a mid-size auto, however larger than a subcompact auto.

Compact autos typically have wheelbases between 100 inches and 109 inches. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) characterizes a "compact" auto as measuring between 100 cubic feet and 109 cubic feet of combined passenger and cargo volume. Vehicle class size is characterized in the U.S. by environmental laws. Classes of similar automobiles. Passenger auto classes are characterized based upon interior volume or seating capacity, except vehicles classified as a special vehicles, for example, those with just two assigned seating positions.

Compact Chevrolet Videos

Compact

Chevrolet Corvair (1960-1969)

1964 Chevrolet Corvair
1964 Chevrolet Corvair
1964 Chevrolet Corvair
1964 Chevrolet Corvair
1969 Chevrolet Corvair Monza
1969 Chevrolet Corvair Monza
The compact Chevrolet Corvair was produced and sold during model years 1960–1969 over two generations. It is the only mass produced American-designed passenger car to utilize an air-cooled, rear engine, the Corvair array included a two-door coupe, convertible, four-door sedan, four-door station wagon, passenger van, commercial van, and pickup truck variations. The Corvair was designed to compete with imported autos, like the first Volkswagen Beetle, Ford Falcon, Plymouth Valiant, Rambler American and Studebaker Lark.

Chevy II / Nova (1961-1988)

1961 Chevrolet Chevy II
1961 Chevrolet Chevy II
1968 Chevrolet Nova
1968 Chevrolet Nova
1988 Chevrolet Nova
1988 Chevrolet Nova
The Chevrolet Chevy II/Nova was manufactured over five generations from model years 1962 through 1979, and 1985 through 1988. Nova was the top nameplate in the Chevy II lineup through 1968 when Chevy II badge was dropped and Nova became into the nameplate for the 1969 through 1979 models. Based on the X-body platform, the Nova was supplanted by the 1980 Chevrolet Citation in 1979. The Nova badge returned in 1985, delivered through 1988 as a New United Motor Manufacturing, Inc ( NUMMI) built, subcompact based upon the front wheel drive, Toyota Sprinter.

Chevrolet Monza (1974-1980) H-Body

1974 Monza Spyder
1974 Chevrolet Monza Spyder
1980 Chevrolet Monza Towne Coupe
1980 Chevrolet Monza Towne Coupe
The Chevrolet Monza is a subcompact, four-passenger automobile produced by Chevrolet for the 1975–1981 model years. The Monza is based on the Chevrolet Vega, sharing its wheelbase, width and 140-CID (2,300 cc) inline-four engine. The 1975 Monza 2+2 was designed to accommodate the GM-Wankel rotary engine, but due to mediocre fuel-economy and emissions-compliance issues the engine was cancelled, and a fuel-efficient, 4.3-liter & 5.7-liter V8 engine option was substituted. The name was also used for the Latin-American version of the Opel Ascona C.

Chevrolet Citation (1980-1985)

1980 Citation X 11 Club Coupe
1980 Chevrolet Citation X 11 Club Coupe
1980 Chevrolet Citation X 11 Club Coupe
1980 Chevrolet Citation X 11 Club Coupe
The Chevrolet Citation is a range of compact cars that was produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors for a single generation, from the 1980 to 1985 model years. Developed as the replacement for the Chevrolet Nova, the Citation was the first Chevrolet sold with front-wheel drive. Chevrolet offered three body styles: a three- and five-door hatchback, alongside a two-door notchback coupe.

The introduction of the Chevrolet Citation marked the drastic downsizing of GM's 2nd generation X-platform, almost reducing its exterior footprint to dimensions of the '71–'80 H-platform (sub)compacts. While the Citation replaced the long-running Chevrolet Nova, it shared the X-platform with the Pontiac Phoenix – sharing the hatchback bodies of the Citation – as well as the Buick Skylark and Oldsmobile Omega, which were given their own sedan bodywork. The Citation notchback coupé body was unique to Chevrolet.

In an extended initial model year, Chevrolet sold over 800,000 units of the 1980 Citation, making it both one of the most successful product launches in General Motors history, but also the best-selling car in the United States in 1980 overall.

Chevrolet Cavalier (1981-2005)

1981 Chevrolet Cavalier Wagon
1981 Chevrolet Cavalier Wagon
2005 Chevrolet Cavalier
2005 Chevrolet Cavalier
The Chevrolet Cavalier is a line of small cars produced for the model years 1982 through 2005 by Chevrolet. As a rebadged variant of General Motors' J-cars, the Cavalier was manufactured alongside the Cadillac Cimarron, Buick Skyhawk, Oldsmobile Firenza, and Pontiac J2000/2000/Sunbird at GM's South Gate Assembly and Janesville Assembly plants, achieving its highest sales in 1984.

Chevrolet Cobalt (2005-present)

2005 Chevrolet Cobalt LS
2005 Chevrolet Cobalt LS
2019 Chevrolet Cobalt
2019 Chevrolet Cobalt
The Chevrolet Cobalt is a compact car initially introduced by Chevrolet in 2004 for the 2005 model year. The Cobalt replaced both the Cavalier and the Toyota-based Geo Prizm/Chevrolet Prizm as Chevrolet's compact car. The Cobalt was available as both a coupe and sedan, and was based on the GM Delta platform also shared with the Chevrolet HHR and the Saturn ION. Also available was a high performance, Chevrolet Cobalt SS.

Chevrolet Corsica (1987-1996)

1987 Chevrolet Corsica
1987 Chevrolet Corsica
The Chevrolet Corsica (named after Corsica, France) is a front-wheel drive compact car that was produced by Chevrolet from 1987 to 1996. The Corsica was built upon the L-body platform. It shared the L-body with the 2-door Beretta, and the rebadged revival of the Pontiac Tempest which was essentially the same car, but was only sold in Canada. The Corsica came in two styles and four trims. Sold initially only as a 4-door sedan, it was also available as a 5-door hatchback from model years 1989 to 1991 (replacing the Chevrolet Cavalier hatchback, which was sold only as a 3-door). Corsicas were built alongside the Beretta by both the Wilmington Assembly in Delaware and Linden Assembly in New Jersey.

Chevrolet Vega (1971–1977)

1971 Chevrolet Vega
1971 Chevrolet Vega
1976 Chevrolet Cosworth Vega
1976 Chevrolet Cosworth Vega
The subcompact Chevrolet Vega was sold from 1970 to 1977. Manufactured in two-door hatchback, notchback, wagon, and board conveyance body styles, all models featured an inline four-cylinder engine made of lightweight, aluminum alloy cylinder block. Variations incorporated the Cosworth Vega, a brief limited production, performance version presented in March 1975.

The Vega got acclaim and honors at its presentation, including 1971 Motor Trend Car of the Year award. Subsequently the auto turned out to be generally known for a scope of issues related to its engineering, reliability, safety, affinity to rust, and engine durability. Although there were a series recalls and configuration upgrades, the Vega's issues tarnished both its own along with General Motors' reputation. 1977 was the final model year.

Chevrolet Spark (2011-present)

2011 Chevrolet Spark
2011 Chevrolet Spark
2019 Chevrolet Spark
2019 Chevrolet Spark
The Chevrolet Spark is a city car produced by GM Korea, originally marketed prominently as the Daewoo Matiz. It has been available solely as a five-door hatchback. The first generation of Daewoo Matiz was launched in 1998 by General Motors' South Korean division GM Korea, previously known as Daewoo Motors, replacing the Daewoo Tico. After the General Motors company took control over Daewoo Motors in 2002, it has increasingly been marketed under the Chevrolet badge. The second generation model was introduced in 2005, with the third generation launched in 2010.

Chevrolet Sonic (2002-present)

2015 Chevrolet Sonic
2015 Chevrolet Sonic
2019 Chevrolet Sonic
2019 Chevrolet Sonic
The Chevrolet Sonic is a subcompact car manufactured since 2002 (by Daewoo from 2002-11), marketed worldwide in 120 countries under seven brands (Chevrolet, Daewoo, Holden, Pontiac, Ravon, and Suzuki). The second generation Aveo began with model year 2012 and was marketed as the Sonic.

Chevrolet Electric

Chevrolet Bolt (2018-present) (BEV)

2019 Chevrolet Bolt
2019 Chevrolet Bolt
The Chevrolet Bolt or Chevrolet Bolt EV is a front-motor, five-door all-electric subcompact hatchback marketed by Chevrolet; developed and manufactured in partnership with LG Corporation. A rebadged European variant is sold as the Opel Ampera-e in mainland Europe. The Bolt has an EPA all-electric range of 238 mi (383 km), and EPA fuel economy rating of 119 miles per gallon gasoline equivalent (mpg-e) (2.0 L/100 km) for combined city/highway driving. The European Ampera-e, has a certified range of 320 mi (520 km) under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and 240 mi (380 km) under the more strict Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedures (WLTP).

Chevrolet Volt (2011-present) (PHEV)

2011 Chevrolet Volt
2011 Chevrolet Volt
2016 Chevrolet Volt
2016 Chevrolet Volt
Sales of the 2011 Volt began in the United States in mid-December 2010, followed by various European countries and other international markets in 2011. Global combined Volt/Ampera-family sales totaled about 177,000 units by the end of October 2018. The U.S. is the leading market, with 148,556 Volts delivered through October 2018, followed by Canada with 16,653 Volts sold through September 2018. Just over 10,000 Opel/Vauxhall Ampera cars had been sold in Europe as of June 2016, with the Netherlands leading the European region. As of September 2018, the Volt/Ampera family of vehicles is the world's all-time best-selling plug-in hybrid vehicle, and the Volt is also the U.S. all-time top-selling plug-in electric car.

The Volt operates as a pure battery electric vehicle until its battery capacity drops to a predetermined threshold from full charge. From there, its internal combustion engine powers an electric generator to extend the vehicle's range as needed. When the engine is running it may be periodically mechanically linked (by a clutch) to a planetary gear set, and hence the output drive axle, to improve energy efficiency. The Volt's regenerative braking also contributes to the on-board electricity generation. Under the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cycle, the 2013/15 model year Volt all-electric range is 38 miles, with a combined electric mode/gasoline-only rating of 62 mpg‑US.

The second-generation Volt's improved battery system and drivetrain increased the all-electric range to 53 miles (85 km), its EPA-rated fuel economy in charge-sustaining mode to 42 mpg‑US (5.6 L/100 km; 50 mpg‑imp), and the combined city/highway fuel economy in all-electric mode to 106 MPG-e, up from 98 MPG-e. Deliveries to retail customers in the U.S. and Canada began in October 2015 as a 2016 model year.

Chevrolet Cruze (2008-present)

2012 Chevrolet Cruze Hatchback
2012 Chevrolet Cruze Hatchback
2019 Chevrolet Cruze
2019 Chevrolet Cruze
The Chevrolet Cruze is a compact car that has been made by the Chevrolet division of General Motors since 2008. The nameplate has been used previously in Japan, for a version of a subcompact hatchback car produced under a joint venture with Suzuki from 2001 to 2007, and was based on the Suzuki Ignis.

Chevrolet Trax (2013-present)

2019 Chevrolet Trax
2019 Chevrolet Trax
The Chevrolet Trax is a subcompact crossover SUV manufactured by Chevrolet since 2013. The car is based on the GM Gamma II platform, which is shared with the Chevrolet Aveo/Sonic, as well as the Opel Mokka/Buick Encore.

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Compact Chevrolet Motor Cars Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5