1939 Cadillac Series 60 Special

Cadillac Motor Cars Through the Years Page 1

GM Brands

A Pictorial Glimpse of Cadillac Motor Cars Page 1

The first Cadillac was introduced in October 1902. a 1903 model. the engine was a10-horsepower, single-cylinder The Cadillac cost around $100, and completely sold out at during is initial introduction at the New York City Automobile Show in 1903 . The first engine for Cadillac featured mechanical overhead valves along with a square bore to stroke ratio. Steering was rack-and-pinion (humm', we use that today) . A first Cadillac innovation was it's special split-core nuts that locked a nut to its thread and did not need lock washers.

Cadillac is the second oldest American automobile brand right behind Buick which holds the number one title. Established during 1902 with the name of Cadillac Automobile Company and subsequently acquired by General Motors in 1909 and during the following 30 years became established as America's foremost luxury automobile brand. Cadillac broke new ground for many automotive accessories which included full electrical systems, clashless syncromesh transmission and the all steel roof. Cadillac developed three engines, of which one of those was the V8 engine which established the standard for American automotive industry.

Cadillac was created from the remnants of the Henry Ford Company. After a dispute between Henry Ford and his financial investors, Ford left the organization together a some of his key partners in March 1902. Ford's money backers William Murphy and Lemuel Bowen brought in architect Henry M. Leland of Leland and Faulconer Manufacturing Company to evaluate the plant and equipment in planning for selling off the organization's assets. Rather, Leland influenced the pair to keep fabricating vehicles utilizing Leland's proven single-cylinder engine. A new organization called the Cadillac Automobile Company was created on August 22, 1902, re-purposing the Henry Ford Company manufacturing plant at Cass St. and Amsterdam Ave. It was named after French voyager Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, who came from France, and he had likewise founded Detroit in 1701.

Cadillac Videos

The First Cadillac vehicles

Cadillac's first autos, the Runabout and Tonneau, were ready to go in October 1902. They were two-seat horseless carriages featuring a 10 hp (7 kW) single-cylinder engine. They were for all intents and purposes indistinguishable to the 1903 Ford Model A. Numerous sources stated that the first auto rolled off the line on October 17; in the book Henry Leland – Master of Precision, the date is October 20; another reliable source indicates auto number three to have been based on October 16. Cadillac showed the new vehicles at the New York Auto Show in January 1903, where the vehicles awed the crowds enough to accumulate more than 2,000 firm orders. Cadillac's greatest selling point was precision producing, and in this manner, unwavering quality; a Cadillac was essentially a superior made vehicle than its rivals.

"Standard Catalog Of Cadillac 1903-2005, 3RD EDITION" An informative book with all the specification covering all the Cadillac years and models. It is a valuable information resource on any Cadillac model. It is particularly helpful if you buy and sell them.


Click on any photo and the page becomes a slide show

Historical Cadillacs

Cadillac Runabout and Tonneau (1903-1908)

The Cadillac Models A, B, C, E, and F shared a single-cylinder 98.2 cu inch engine rated from 6.5 to around 9 hp depending upon the model. The cylinder was horizontal, pointing rearward, and was cast from iron with a copper water jacket. Bore and stroke were square at 5 inches. The engine was named by its manufacturers, Leland and Faulkner, "Little Hercules".

Cadillac Model A (1903-1904)

1903 Cadillac Model A
1903 Cadillac Model A
1908 Cadillac Model A
1908 Cadillac Model A
Throughout 1903, 2,497 units were built. Production began in March 1903 and output totaled 1,895 units from March 1903 to March 1904. The 2-seater runabout cost $750; an optional rear entrance detachable tonneau cost $100 and doubled the occupant capacity. The entire body was bolted to the chassis and could be lifted without removing or disconnecting any plumbing or wiring. Cadillacs of 1903 sometimes are identified erroneously as the Model A; in fact, they were known simply as the "Cadillac Runabout" and the "Cadillac Tonneau". When a new Cadillac was introduced in 1904, it was designated the "Model B"; meanwhile, production of the earlier runabout and tonneau models continued through a second year. Only at that time did Cadillac began to designate them as Model A cars to distinguish them from the new, 1904 models.

Cadillac Model B, C, E, F (1904-1905)

1904 Cadillac Model B
1904 Cadillac Model B
1905 Cadillac Model C Touring
1905 Cadillac Model C Touring
1905 Cadillac Model E Runabout
1905 Cadillac Model E Runabout
1904 Cadillac Model F
1904 Cadillac Model F
Introduced in January 1904 Cadillac's Model B was similar to their Model A, sharing its engine but using a pressed-steel frame and axles and the Model B was on a longer 76 inch wheelbase. The front axle is described as girder-style. It supported the car through a single transverse half-elliptic spring. The sloping dash was replaced by a detachable box-like front to the body and a vertical radiator. All body styles lost as much as 70 pounds weight. Prices went up $50. The car was advertised as having 8 1⁄4 horsepower but there were no changes to the design of the engine

Cadillac Model D, H, L (1905-1908)

1905 Cadillac Model D
1905 Cadillac Model D
1908 Cadillac Model H
1908 Cadillac Model H
1906 Cadillac Model L
1906 Cadillac Model L
The Cadillac Model D is an American brass age car that was introduced by Cadillac in January 1905, and sold throughout that year. It was a larger automobile than previous Cadillac offerings, and their first four-cylinder production model. Priced at $2800, it can be seen as the first luxury car from the company. The engine was a 300.7 inch four-cylinder L-head design producing a claimed 30 hp. The car used a complicated 3-speed planetary transmission and had a governed throttle, essentially a primitive cruise control.

Cadillac Model 30 (1909-1913)

1909 Cadillac Model 30
1909 Cadillac Model 30
1910 Cadillac Model 30
1910 Cadillac Model 30
1911 Cadillac Model 30
1911 Cadillac Model 30
1912 Cadillac Model 30
1912 Cadillac Model 30
1913 Cadillac Model 30
1913 Cadillac Model 30
The Cadillac Model Thirty is an automobile that was introduced in December 1909 by Cadillac, and sold through 1911. It was the company's only model for those years and was based on the 1907 Model G. The 1912 Model 1912, 1913 Model 1913, and 1914 Model 1914 were similar but used larger engines.

Cadillac Types 51, 53, 55, 57, 59 (1915-1923)

1915 Cadillac Type 51
1915 Cadillac Type 51
1916 Cadillac Type 53 Pickup
1916 Cadillac Type 53 Pickup
1916 Cadillac Type 53 Pickup
1917 Cadillac Type 55 Opera Coupe
1919 Cadillac Type 57 Touring
1919 Cadillac Type 57 Touring
1920 Cadillac Type 59 Phaeton
1920 Cadillac Type 59 Phaeton
The Cadillac Type 51 is a large, luxurious automobile that was introduced in September 1914 by Cadillac as a 1915 model. It was Cadillac's first V8 automobile, replacing the four-cylinder Model 30. The similar Types 53, 55, 57, 59, and 61 lasted through 1923, when the design was substantially updated as the Type V-63. It used the GM A platform for the entire series. It was built at the Cass Street and Amsterdam Avenue factory in Detroit, with the body provided by a number of coachbuilders, including Fleetwood Metal Body in Fleetwood, Pennsylvania.

Cadillac Type V-63 (1924-1929)

1923 Cadillac Coupe
1923 Cadillac Coupe
1924 Cadillac V-63 Sedan
1924 Cadillac V-63 Sedan
1925 Cadillac V-63 Sedan
1925 Cadillac V-63 Sedan
1929 Cadillac V-63 Sedan
1929 Cadillac V-63 Sedan
The Cadillac Type V-63 is a large luxury automobile that was introduced in September 1923 by Cadillac as a 1924 model, replacing the previous Type 61. It used the GM C platform and was replaced by the Cadillac Series 355. The V-63 used an improved version of the L-head V8 engine that made Cadillac famous. The main innovation was a cross-plane crankshaft which improved balance and smoothness. This design required complex mathematical analysis, and was simultaneously patented by Peerless. Both companies agreed to share the innovation, which has now become common. Another innovation in the V-63 was front-wheel brakes.

LaSalle (1927-1940) C Platform

1927 LaSalle Sport Phaeton
1927 LaSalle Sport Phaeton
1932 LaSalle 340 Sedan
1932 LaSalle 340 Sedan
1933 LaSalle V8 Convertible
1933 LaSalle V8 Convertible
1934 LaSalle Series 50 Convertible
1934 LaSalle Series 50 Convertible
1935 LaSalle Sedan
1935 LaSalle Sedan
1936 LaSalle Model 36-50
1936 LaSalle Model 36-50
1937 LaSalle 50 Sedan
1937 LaSalle 50 Sedan
1938 LaSalle Special Convertible
1938 LaSalle Special Convertible
1939 LaSalle
1939 LaSalle
1940 LaSalle Special Convertible
1940 LaSalle Special Convertible
LaSalle was an American brand of luxury automobiles manufactured and marketed by General Motors' Cadillac division from 1927 through 1940. Alfred P. Sloan developed the concept for LaSalle and certain other General Motors' marques in order to fill pricing gaps he perceived in the General Motors product portfolio. Sloan created LaSalle as a companion marque for Cadillac. LaSalle automobiles were manufactured by Cadillac, but were priced lower than Cadillac-branded automobiles and were marketed as the second-most prestigious marque in the General Motors portfolio.

By the time the decision was made to drop the LaSalle in 1940, at least three wood and metal mockups had been made for potential 1941 LaSalle models. One was based on the notchback GM C platform which ended up being shared by the Cadillac Series 62, Buick Roadmaster and Super, the Oldsmobile 90 and the Pontiac Custom Torpedo. A second was based on the fastback GM B platform which ended up being shared by the Cadillac Series 61, the Buick Century and Special, the Oldsmobile 70 and the Pontiac Streamliner Torpedo. A third was a modified notchback design, derived from the fastback B-body, but described as "A-body-like", that ended up being used by the Cadillac Series 63.

Cadillac Series 341 (1928-1929)

1928 Cadillac 341A Town Sedan 4-door
1928 Cadillac 341A Town Sedan 4-door
1929 Cadillac 341B Phaeton
1929 Cadillac 341B Phaeton
The 1928 Cadillac received a new, larger V8 engine to replace the original one that dated back to 1915. This was a good year for the marque; production totaled 20,001 for the year. The Series 341 Cadillac rode on a 140-inch wheelbase, and the 341-cubic inch engine produced a top speed of 70 mph. The chassis had underslung rear springs, which allowed bodies to be lower than before. The 1928 model, which was the first Cadillac designed by Harley Earl, bore a distinct resemblance to the LaSalle introduced the prior year. No less than 42 standard body styles by Fisher or Fleetwood were listed in the catalog for 1928.

Cadillac 353-355 Series (1930-1935)

1930 Cadillac
1930 Cadillac
1931 Cadillac 355A Convertible
1931 Cadillac 355A Convertible
1932 Cadillac V16 425B Fleetwood
1932 Cadillac V16 425B Fleetwood
1933 Cadillac V16 Fleetwood Convertible
1933 Cadillac V16 Fleetwood Convertible
1934 Cadillac V16 Convertible Fleetwood
1934 Cadillac V16 Convertible Fleetwood
1934 Cadillac 355D
1934 Cadillac 355D
1935 Cadillac Convertible
1935 Cadillac Convertible
The 353 series was built on a 140-inch wheelbase chassis and was powered by Cadillac's proven 353 cubic-inch V-8 motor that developed 96 horsepower. More than 50 different body styles were available on the 353 chassis.

The Cadillac Series 355 was manufactured by Cadillac from 1931 to 1935. They were 8-cylinder cars, sold in several models: a 2-door club coupe, a 2-door convertible, 4-door convertible, a 4-door sedan a 4-door town car and a 4-door limousine. The 1934 Model 355D was completely restyled and mounted on an entirely new chassis but used the same engine as in 1933. The Model 355 was divided into three series, the Series 10, 20 and 30. Bodies on the Series 10 and 20 were built by Fisher and on the Series 30 by Fleetwood. The bodies on the Series 30 were shared with the Cadillac V-12 and V-16. Styling emphasized streamlining, including concealment of all chassis features except the wheels. It was replaced by the  Series 70.

Cadillac Series 370 V-12 (1930-1935)

1931 Cadillac Series 370
1931 Cadillac Series 370
1932 Cadillac Series 370
1932 Cadillac Series 370
1933 Cadillac Series 370 C V12 Coupe
1933 Cadillac Series 370 C V12 Coupe
1934 Cadillac Series 370 V12 Town Sedan
1934 Cadillac Series 370 V12 Town Sedan
1935 Cadillac Series 370
1935 Cadillac Series 370
The Cadillac V-12 is a top-of-the-line car that was manufactured by Cadillac from the 1931 through the 1937 model years. All were furnished with custom bodies, and the car was built in relatively small numbers. A total of 10,903 were made in the seven model years that the automobile was built, with the majority having been constructed in its inaugural year. It was Cadillac's first, and is to date, Cadillac's only standard production V-12 powered car.

The Cadillac V-12 was renamed the Series 80 and 85 in 1936. The Series 80 and 85 featured a 131" and 138" wheelbase respectively. All V-12s were now Fleetwood bodied and had Turret Tops. A total of 901 V-12s were sold in 1936. In 1937 the Series 80 was dropped leaving only the long wheelbase Series 85. The only significant mechanical changes were the adoption of an oil-bath air cleaner and a pressure radiator cap. Sales were only 478. The Series 85 was discontinued at the end of 1937

Cadillac Series 452 V-16 (1930-1940)

1930 Cadillac Seroes 452 A
1930 Cadillac Series 452 A
1937 Cadillac Series 452 V16 3 Window Coupe
1937 Cadillac Series 452 V16 3 Window Coupe
1938 Cadillac Series 452 V16 Convertible
1938 Cadillac Series 452 V16 Convertible
1939 Cadillac Series 452 V16 Coupe
1939 Cadillac Series 452 V16 Coupe
1940 Cadillac Series 452 A V16 Formal Sedan
1940 Cadillac Series 452 A V16 Formal Sedan
The Cadillac V-16 (also known as the Cadillac Sixteen) was Cadillac's top-of-the-line model from its January 1930 launch until 1940. The V16 powered car was a first in the United States, both extremely expensive and exclusive, with all chassis finished to custom order. Only 4076 were constructed in its 11-year run, with the majority built in its debut year before the Great Depression took strong hold. The onset of World War II reduced the sales, resulting in its demise.

Cadillac Full Size

B Platform (1926-1996)

Initially, the B-Platform was utilized for Buick and Oldsmobile vehicles, while the A-platform was utilized for Chevrolet and Oakland, and the C-body and D-body was committed to Cadillac.

The B-Platform was utilized for the Pontiac Streamliner Torpedo and Streamliner, Oldsmobile Series L, Series 70 and Series 88, Buick Special and Century, LaSalle Series 50 and Cadillac Series 60, Series 61 and the Series 63. The B-body turned into GM's base model platform in 1958, when all current Chevrolet items were moved up to the B-body.

The GM B-body was inaugurated in 1926 with the Buick Master Six, and Oldsmobile Model 30, and had no less than 12 major restyling and re-engineering changes

C Platform (1936-1984)

The C Platform was introduced in 1931 and was utilized until 1984. From no less than 1941, when the B-body followed this same pattern in adapting the C-body's lower and more extensive body styles without running boards, it might be thought of as an extended rendition of the GM B platform. Subsequent to 1984, the platform was supplanted by the GM D platform and produced until 1996.

The C-body was utilized for the Pontiac 24/29 Torpedo, Oldsmobile 90, Buick Roadmaster, Super and 1958 Limited, LaSalle Series 52, and all mid-level Cadillacs' beginning with the Cadillac Series 355.

For the most part the C-Body was for the top of-the-line models of many General Motors divisions including the Oldsmobile 98, Buick Electra, and the base model for numerous Cadillac's including the 6200 Series Calais, 6300 Series de Ville, the 6400 Series Eldorado, the 6000 Series Fleetwood Sixty Special and the Fleetwood Brougham.

D Platform or D Body - (1936-1996)

Amid the majority of the twentieth the D-Body was GM's largest and most exclusive automobile platform. The D-body was utilized for the Cadillac Series 85 from 1936 thru 1937, the Cadillac Series 90 from 1936 thru 1940, the Buick Limited from 1936 thru 1942, the Cadillac Series 72 in 1940, the Cadillac Series 67 from 1941 thru 1942, the Cadillac Fleetwood Series 75 from 1936 thru 1976, and the Cadillac Fleetwood Limousine from 1977 thru 1984.

Cadillac Series 70, 75 (1936-1976, 1984-1987)

1936 Cadillac Series 70 Sedan
1936 Cadillac Series 70 Sedan
1937 cadillac fleetwood series 70
1937 cadillac fleetwood series 70
1938 Cadillac V-8 Convertible Sedan by Fleetwood
1938 Cadillac V-8 Convertible Sedan by Fleetwood
1939 Cadillac Series 75 Convertible
1939 Cadillac Series 75 Convertible
1940 Cadillac Series 75 Convertible
1940 Cadillac Series 75 Convertible
1941 Cadillac Series 75 Sedan
1941 Cadillac Series 75 Sedan
1950 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
1950 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
1970 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
1970 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
1966 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
1966 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
1980 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
1980 Cadillac Series 75 Fleetwood Limousine
The Cadillac Series 70 (models 70 and 75) is a full-size V8-powered series of cars that were produced by Cadillac from the 1930s through the 1980s. It replaced the 1935 355E as the company's mainstream car just as the much less expensive Series 60 was introduced. The Series 72 and 67 were similar to the Series 75 but the 72 and 67 were produced on a slightly shorter and longer wheelbase respectively. The Series 72 was only produced in 1940 and the Series 67 was only produced in 1941 and 1942. The short wheelbase Series 70 would cease production in 1938, but reappear briefly as the relatively expensive and exclusive Series 70 Eldorado Brougham 4-door hardtop from 1957 to 1958, while the long wheelbase Series 75 would make a final appearance in the 1987 model year.

Cadillac Series 60 (1938-1951) B Platform

1939 Cadillac Series 60 Special
1939 Cadillac Series 60 Special
1939 Cadillac 60 Specia
1939 Cadillac 60 Special
1940 Cadillac
1940 Cadillac
1941 Cadillac 60S
1941 Cadillac 60S
The Cadillac Series 60 was Cadillac's mid-priced entry in the luxury vehicle market when it appeared in 1936. It was replaced by the Series 61 in 1939, but a model that was derived from it, the Sixty Special, continued off and on through 1993. The Series 60 was the brainchild of new Cadillac manager, Nicholas Dreystadt. Debuting in 1936, it filled a gaping price gap between the LaSalles and Series 70 Cadillac models. Initially it rode on a 121.0 inch wheelbase and shared the B body with cars from LaSalle, Buick, and Oldsmobile. This went up to 124.0 inches in 1937-38.

Cadillac Series 61 (1938-1961) B Platform

1941 Cadillac Series 61 Sedan
1941 Cadillac Series 61 Sedan
The Cadillac Series 61 replaced the Series 60/65 (except for the upscale Sixty Special) in Cadillac's 1939 model range. It in turn was replaced by the Series 62 in 1940 only to return to production in model year 1941. Apart from model years 19431945 It remained in production through 1951.

Cadillac Series 62 (1940-1964) C Platform

1942 Cadillac Convertible
1942 Cadillac Convertible
1946 Cadillac
1946 Cadillac
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
1948 Cadillac
1948 Cadillac Series 62
1949 Cadillac FastBack
1949 Cadillac FastBack Series 62
1950 Cadillac Series 62
1950 Cadillac Series 62
1959 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
1959 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
The Cadillac Series 62 was produced by Cadillac from 1940 through 1964. Originally designed to replace the entry level Series 65, it became the Cadillac Series 6200 in 1959, and remained that until it was renamed to Cadillac Calais for the 1965 model year. The Series 62 was also marketed as the Sixty-Two and the Series Sixty-Two.

Cadillac Series 63 (1941-1942) C Platform

1941 Cadillac Series 63
1941 Cadillac Series 63
The Series 63 was similar to the 61. It was available as a sedan only and rode on the same wheelbase. By the time the decision was made to drop the LaSalle for 1941, at least three wood and metal mockups had been made for potential LaSalle models. One was based on the notchback GM C platform which ended up being shared by the Cadillac Series 62, Buick Roadmaster and Super, the Oldsmobile 90 and the Pontiac Custom Torpedo. A second was based on the fastback GM B platform which ended up being shared by the Cadillac Series 61, the Buick Century and Special, the Oldsmobile 70 and the Pontiac Streamliner Torpedo. A third was a modified notchback design, derived from the fastback B-body, but described as "A-body-like", that ended up being used by the Cadillac Series 63

Cadillac DeVille series (1949-2005) C Platform

1950 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1950 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1950 Cadillac DeVille
1950 Cadillac DeVille
1950 Cadillac DeVille
1950 Cadillac DeVille
1951 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1951 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1952 Cadillac Convertible
1952 Cadillac Convertible
1953 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1953 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1954 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1954 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1955 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1955 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1956 Cadillac Convertible
1956 Cadillac Convertible
1960 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1960 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1967 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1967 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1969 Cadillac Deville
1969 Cadillac Deville
1971 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1971 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1972 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1972 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1973 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1973 Cadillac Coupe Deville

The Cadillac DeVille was originally a trim level and later a separate model produced by Cadillac. The first car to bear the name was the 1949 Coupe de Ville, a pillarless two-door hardtop body style with a prestige trim level above that of the Series 62 luxury coupe. The last model to be formally known as a DeVille was the 2005 Cadillac DeVille, a full-size sedan, the largest car in the Cadillac model range at the time. In 2005, the DeVille was officially renamed DTS

More Cadillacs on page 2

Get Your Very Own Scale Model Cadillacs

1950 Cadillac El Dorado Scale Model Shown
1959 Cadillac El Dorado Scale Model Shown
  • Approx. 7-1/2" Long
  • Scaled replicas of cars and trucks
  • Die-cast metal body with plastic details
  • Opening doors on all - some with opening hoods and trunks
  • Detailed chassis
  • Choose from over 100 scale model Cadillac Vehicles at Amazon
  • This site claims no credit for any images posted on this site unless otherwise noted. Images on this site are copyright to its respectful owners. If there is an image appearing on this site that belongs to you and do not wish for it appear on this site, please E-mail with a link to said image and it will be promptly removed.

    Help Me Help You!

    I support my family through this website, as odd as it might seem. If you find the information on these pages as helpful as a book you might have bought, feel free to help me continue helping everyone. If you've gotten anything through one of my links or helped otherwise, It's great people like you who allow me to maintain this site full-time.
    Thanks!
    The biggest help is when you use any link on any of my pages when you buy anything, regardless of the country in which you live. It costs you nothing, and is this site and my family's, biggest source of support and they have the best prices and service, which is why I recommend them all personally.

    Keep Your Car Looking New

    Cadillac Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5