2019 Audi R8

 

Audi Motor Cars Through the Years

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A Pictorial Glimpse of Audi Motor Cars

Audi AG is headquartered in Ingolstadt, Germany and has been a wholly-owned (99.55%) subsidiary of the Volkswagen Group (Volkswagen AG) since 1964. Volkswagen Group re-launched the Audi brand with the 1965 introduction of the Audi 60 range. Shortly thereafter the name was acquired as part of Volkswagen's purchase of the Auto Union assets from former owner, Daimler-Benz.

The company name is based on the surname of the founder August Horch, the name itself an English cognate with the English word "hark", meaning listen — which when translated into Latin, becomes Audi.

The Audi 10/22 hp Type A (16 kW) Sport-Phaeton, became the first Audi produced in 1910, followed by it's successor Type B 10/28PS during the same year. Audi began with a 2,612 cc inline-four motor model Type A, succeeded by a 3,564 cc version, and in addition, a 4,680 cc and 5,720 cc models. These autos were a success even in sporting events. The first six-cylinder model, the Type M, 4,655 cc was produced in 1924.

August Horch left Audiwerke in 1920 for a position at the German ministry of transport, yet he was still involved with Audi as a board of trustees member. During September 1921, Audi was the first German auto producer to build a production auto, the Audi Type K, with left-hand drive. Subsequently left-hand drive spread and became dominate in the 1920s since it gave a superior view of approaching traffic, making passing safer.

See the book: Four Rings: The Audi Story

Audi Videos

In the mid-to-late 1990s, Audi presented new advances including the utilization of aluminum construction. Delivered from 1999 through 2005, the Audi A2 was a super mini from the future., conceived from the Al2 idea, with numerous elements that recovered consumer confidence, such as the aluminum space frame, which was a first in production auto design. In the A2 Audi additionally extended their TDI innovation using economical three-cylinder engines. The A2 was amazingly aerodynamic and was designed using a wind tunnel. The Audi A2 was chastised for its high cost and was never truly a sales success yet it planted Audi as a cutting-edge producer. The model, a Mercedes-Benz A-Class contender, sold generally well in Europe. Nonetheless, the A2 was discontinued in 2005 and Audi chose not to deliver an immediate replacement.

The next major model change occurred in 1995 when the Audi A4 took the place of the Audi 80. A new classification plan was applied to the Audi 100 which became the Audi A6 (with a minor facelift). This additionally implied the S4 turned into the S6 and another S4 was presented in the A4 body. The S2 subsequently was discontinued. The Audi Cabriolet proceeded on (in light of the Audi 80 platform) until 1999, picking up the engine upgrades en route. A new A3 hatchback version (sharing the Volkswagen Golf Mk4's platform) was announced in 1996, and the radical Audi TT coupe and roadster were debuted in 1998 in based upon similar underpinnings.

The available engines all through the range were a 1.4 L, 1.6 L along with a 1.8 L four-cylinder, 1.8 L four-cylinder turbo charged, 2.6 L and 2.8 L V6, 2.2 L turbo five-cylinder plus the 4.2 L V8 engine. In 1998, the V6s were supplanted by updated 2.4 L and 2.8 L 30V V6s, with marked power improvement along with torque and smoothness. Advance engines were added en route, including a new 3.7 L V8 and 6.0 L W12 engine in the A8.


Auto Union AG, Chemnitz, was an amalgamation of four German automobile manufacturers (Audi, Horch, DKW, Wanderer), founded in 1932 and established in 1936 in Chemnitz, Saxony. It is the immediate predecessor of Audi as it is known today.

Audi was created On 25 April 1910 as the   Audi Automobilwerke GmbH Zwickau and (from 1915 on  named the Audiwerke AG Zwickau )

After being reduced to near ruin in the aftermath of World War II, Auto Union was re-founded in Ingolstadt, Bavaria in 1949, ultimately evolving into the modern day Audi company following its takeover by Volkswagen in 1964 and later merger with NSU Motorenwerke in 1969.

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Historical Audi Models (1910-1928)

Audi Type A (1910-1912)

1911 Audi Type A
1911 Audi Type A
The Audi Type A is an automobile which was introduced in 1910. It is considered to be the oldest vehicle under the Audi name. A total of 140 vehicles were produced. In 1911 the type A was succeeded by the Audi Type B

Audi Type B (1910-1914)

1910 Audi 10-28 HP Type B Phaeton
1910 Audi 10-28 HP Type B Phaeton
The Audi Type B was introduced in 1910 as a successor to the Audi Type A, there was an overall 360 of the Type B built. It used a four-cylinder, two-block inline engine with 2.6 Litres of displacement. It developed 28 hp through a four-speed countershaft gearbox and a propeller shaft, which drove the rear wheels. The car had a ladder frame and two leaf-sprung solid axles.

Audi Type C (1912-1921)

1936 Audi Type C
1936 Audi Type C
The Audi Type C was introduced in 1912. It became popular with the German people and Army, being brought back into production for a couple of years after the war. Its performance, handling and reliability along with rally successes greatly raised Audi's profile, and the Type C was a commercial success. 1,116 cars were produced. It featured a four cylinder in-line engine with a displacement of 3,564 cc, with a maximum output of 35 hp at 1800 rpm. The Type C had a maximum speed of 56 mph.

Audi Type D (1912-1920)

The Audi Type D was introduced in 1911. The vehicle had a four-cylinder in-line engine with 4.7 litres of displacement. It developed 45 PS over a four-speed countershaft gearbox and a propeller shaft, which drove the rear wheels. The car had a ladder frame and two leaf-sprung solid axles. The Type D was available as a four-seat touring car or four-door sedan. Until 1920, only 53 copies of the car were built.

Audi Type E (1911-1924)

1923 Audi Type E
1923 Audi Type E
The Audi Type E was a passenger car introduced by Audi in 1913. It was the largest pre-war car from Audi. The vehicle had a four-cylinder two-block in-line engine with 5,699 cc of displacement. It developed over a four-speed countershaft gearbox and a propeller shaft, which drove the rear wheels. The claimed maximum output was 54 hp at 1650 or 1750 rpm, supporting a top speed of 56 mph. The foot brake operated via a mechanical linkage on the drive shaft.

Audi Type G (1914-1923)

1914 Audi Type G
1914 Audi Type G
The Audi Type G is a passenger car produced by Audi between 1914 and 1923. It is Audi's smallest and least powerful pre-war car. The vehicle had a four-cylinder two-block in-line engine with 2,084 cc of displacement with which developed a maximum of 22 hp at 1900 rpm. Power was transmitted to the rear wheels through a four-speed countershaft gearbox and a steel propeller shaft. A top speed of 40 mph was claimed. The mechanical foot brake worked directly on the propeller shaft. The car had a ladder frame and two leaf-sprung solid axles. It was available as a sports two-seater.

Audi Type K (1922-1925)

1922 Audi Type K
1922 Audi Type K
The Audi Type K was a car introduced by Audi at the Berlin Motor Show in September 1921. Since the end of the war Audi had till now produced only cars of pre-war design, so that the Type K was the first post-war Audi design to be offered. The Type K entered production in 1922 and was withdrawn in 1925, by which time the company had commenced production, in 1924, their Type M model which can be seen as a larger replacement for the Type K. The Audi Type K was the first volume produced car in Germany to feature left-hand drive.

Audi Type M (1924-1927)

1924 Audi Type M
1924 Audi Type M
The Audi Type M was a large, well constructed, reliable, fast and very expensive car first presented at the Berlin Motor Show in 1923 and produced by Audi between 1924 and 1927. The vehicle had a six-cylinder in-line engine with 4,655 cc of displacement. The engine incorporated several innovative features including overhead valves. It developed a maximum of 69 hp at 3,000 rpm. Power was transmitted to the rear wheels through a four-speed transmission. The engine had an eight-bearing crankshaft, forced lubrication with oil cooler and a thermostat-controlled water cooling. The car had two leaf-sprung solid axles and four wheel hydraulic brakes. It was the first Audi with four-wheel brakes

Historical Audi Models (1928-1940)

Audi Type R (1928-1942)

1929 Audi Typ R
1929 Audi Typ R "Imperator" Phaeton
The Audi Type R was a large, well-constructed, reliable, fast and expensive car produced by Audi between 1928 and 1932 as a successor to the Audi Type M. The Type R closely resembled the predecessor model, which had been perceived as too expensive. In reality the Type R was a little smaller than the Type M, its specification was less lavish and its price was lower. Nevertheless, it remained a large, expensive car produced during a period characterized by increasing austerity as the economy underwent the aftershocks from the stock market crashes and bank failures of 1929. Like its even more extravagant predecessor the Type R struggled to find customers

Audi Type SS (1929-1932)

1929 Audi Type SS
1929 Audi Type SS
The Audi Type SS was a large, eight-cylinder-powered sedan/saloon car introduced by Audi in 1929 in succession to the Type R "Imperator". Jørgen Skafte Rasmussen, the Danish-born entrepreneurial industrialist who had purchased Audi-Werke in 1928, had previously, in 1927, purchased the manufacturing plant of the bankrupt Detroit-based Rickenbacker business and shipped it home to Germany. He installed it in a factory he owned just outside Zschopau, near to Audi's own Zwickau plant. The plan was to build large, relatively inexpensive US-style "Rasmussen engines" for sales to other German auto-makers. The plan failed in that Rasmussen failed to secure any orders for the engines, so he instead produced a couple of models of his own which used them. The Audi Type SS (Zwickau) was one of these.

Audi Type P (1931-1932)

1931 Audi Typ P 5/30 PS Limousine
1931 Audi Typ P 5/30 PS Limousine
Jørgen Skafte Rasmussen who had purchased Audiwerke AG in 1928 was concerned that the Audi Zwickau plant was badly underutilized because demand for the expensive luxury cars that Audi produced was still restricted by the economic contraction that had followed the 1929 Stock-market crashes. The other company owned by Rasmussen was Zschopauer Motorenwerke with its brand DKW, which had in 1929 introduced the small rear-wheel drive DKW Typ 4=8. Zschopauer Motorenwerke was the nation's largest producer of motor-bikes, and used a motor-bike style two-stroke engine in their own small cars.

Audi Type T (1931-1942)

1931 Audi Type T
1931 Audi Type T
The Audi Type T was a large, 6-cylinder-powered sedan/saloon car introduced by Audi in 1931. It was in most respects a scaled-down version of the manufacturer's Type SS "Zwickau", which had appeared two years earlier. Jørgen Skafte Rasmussen, the Danish-born entrepreneurial industrialist who had purchased Audi-Werke in 1928, had previously, in 1927, purchased the manufacturing plant of the bankrupt Detroit-based Rickenbacker business and shipped it home to Germany. He installed it in a factory he owned just outside Zschopau, near to Audi's own Zwickau plant. The plan was to build large, relatively inexpensive US-style engines for sales to other German auto-makers. The plan failed in that Rasmussen failed to secure any orders for the engines, so he instead produced two models of his own which used engines produced using the Rickenbacker plant. The Audi Type T (Zwickau) was the second and smaller of these

Audi Front (1933-1938)

1934 Audi Front
1934 Audi Front
Initially presented early in 1933, the Audi Front UW 220 was Europe’s first car to combine front-wheel drive with a six-cylinder engine. It remained in production for slightly under two years before being replaced by the Audi Front UW 225 featuring a larger 2.25-litre engine. The larger-engined car introduced in 1935 was built till April 1938 and continued to be listed into 1939. Between 1933 and 1938, the Front was the only Audi in volume production.

Audi 920 (1938-1940)

1938 Audi 920
1938 Audi 920
The Audi 920 was introduced in 1938 by Audi to replace the Audi Front UW 225. Its engine was a shortened version of the eight-cylinder in-line engine used by sister company Horch. The car was planned to occupy a niche in the Auto Union range between the large Horch products and the middle market cars produced by Wanderer. Audi had no stand-alone production facilities at that time and the car was produced, like its predecessor, at the Horch plant.

Post WWII

Audi IFA8 / IFA9 (1939-1942)(1948-1955)

1939 Audi IFA F8
1939 Audi IFA F8
1949 Audi IFA F9
1949 Audi IFA F9
The DKW F8 compact front-wheel drive two-stroke engined saloon was introduced in 1939. The F8 was slightly shorter than its predecessor despite having a marginally increased wheelbase. The base model, known as the Reichsklasse, was manufactured only till 1940 but the Meisterklasse sedan continued in production until 1942. In addition to the saloons, cabriolet versions were offered.

After the war the car reappeared in 1949 as the IFA F8, from the Zwickau plant which now operated under Soviet control. The factory and operation was reorganized as a Volkseigener Betrieb (or "People Owned Enterprise") Automobilwerke Zwickau (AWZ). The F8 continued in production at Zwickau until approximately 1955: in addition to the sedan and cabriolet bodies, various additional body types available post war included a delivery van and estate variant.

Large Audi Cars

Audi A8/S8 (1994-present)

1994 Audi A8 D2
1994 Audi A8 D2
2000 Audi A8 D2
2000 Audi A8 D2
2017 Audi A8
2017 Audi A8
2018 Audi A8
2018 Audi A8
2019 Audi A8
2019 Audi A8
The Audi A8 is a four-door, full-size, luxury sedan manufactured and marketed by Audi since 1994. Succeeding the Audi V8, and now in its fourth generation, the A8 has been offered with both front- or permanent all-wheel drive—and in short- and long-wheelbase variants. The first two generations employed the Volkswagen Group D platform, with the current generation deriving from the MLB platform. After the original model's 1994 release, Audi released the second generation in late 2002, the third in late 2009, and the fourth and current iteration in 2017.

Audi Mid Size

Audi C1/C2/C3/C4 (1968-1994)

The Audi 100 and Audi 200 are four-door, front-engine, front- or all-wheel drive full-size/executive sedans manufactured and marketed by the Audi division of the Volkswagen Group for model years 1968 through 1994 — across four generations:
(C1 1968-1976) (C4 ), with a two-door model available in the first and second generation
(C2 1976-1982) and a five-door wagon available in the third generation
(C3 1983-1991), (C4 1990-1994) The third generation Audi 100/5000 (1984-1988) was widely noted for its advanced aerodynamic design solutions, which included pin-located, flush side windows — and achieved a drag coefficient of 0.30. The C2 and C3 models of the Audi 100 were marketed initially in the United States as the Audi 5000 (1984-1988) and in South Africa as the Audi 500.

Audi 100 (C1, 1968–1976)

1968 Audi 100
1968 Audi 100 C1
1974 Audi 100 LS
1974 Audi 100 LS
1975 Audi 100
1975 Audi 100 C1
The first Audi 100, developed by Volkswagen's subsidiary Auto Union at Ingolstadt, was shown to the press as a four-door sedan on November 26, 1968. Its name originally denoting a power output of 100 PS (74 kW), the Audi 100 was the company's largest car since the revival of the Audi brand by Volkswagen in 1965. The C1 platform spawned several variants: the Audi 100 two- and four-door saloons, and the Audi 100 Coupé S, a fastback coupé, which bore a resemblance to the Aston Martin DBS released a year earlier, especially at the rear end, including details such as the louvers behind the rear side windows and the shape of the rear light clusters.

Audi 100, 200 and 5000 (C2, 1976–1982)

1976 Audi 100 C2
1976 Audi 100 C2
1979 Audi 100 GLS 5E
1979 Audi 100 GLS 5E
1980 Audi 100 GLS 5E
1980 Audi 100 GLS 5E
The restyled C2 Audi 100 was launched in 1976, with an in-line five-cylinder engine. It was initially a 100 PS (74 kW) engine offering "six-cylinder power and four-cylinder economy", and later upgraded to 136 PS (100 kW). The Coupé was discontinued, but a five-door hatchback model, the 100 Avant, was launched in August 1977 as part of this generation. The mainstay of the range remained the four-door sedan model. A two-door sedan version was offered, primarily on the domestic market, from February 1977, but by now there was little demand for large two-door sedans and thus only a few of these two-door Audi 100 C2s were sold. At the top of the line, the Audi 200 made its appearance at the 1979 Frankfurt Show, with fuel injected five-cylinder engines in either naturally aspirated or turbocharged forms

Audi 100, 200 and 5000 (C3, 1982–1991)

1987 Audi 5000S
1987 Audi 5000S
1988 Audi 5000 CS Turbo Quattro
1988 Audi 5000 CS Turbo Quattro
1990 Audi 100
1990 Audi 100
The third generation Audi 100, launched in September 1982, had an aerodynamic look, achieving a drag coefficient of 0.30 for its smoothest base model. The increased aerodynamic efficiency resulted in better fuel economy. The design was in contrast from the boxy shape of the C2. Audi innovated flush windows on the C3, a key area for aerodynamic drag that has been widely adopted by other manufacturers. The aerodynamic body gave the 100 higher top speed than other cars of similar engine size. A new technology introduced in the C3 included the procon-ten safety system.

Audi 100 (C4, 1990–1994)

1991 Audi 100 C4
1991 Audi 100 C4
1994 Audi 100 C4
1994 Audi 100 C4
Audi released the C4 (a heavily revised C3) in late 1990 in Continental Europe and 1991 in other markets, including the right-hand drive British market. The C3-platform Audi V8 continued to be sold as a separate line. The major change for the C4 was the introduction of a 2.8 L, 90-degree, SOHC 12v, V6 engine. It was later joined by a 2.6 L variant, of the same configuration as the 2.8 L unit. They are essentially the same engines offered in the 1992, B4 Audi 80. The option of quattro permanent four-wheel drive was an option across the range, and the Audi 100 quattro was available with a ZF four-speed automatic gearbox.

Audi Quatro (1980-1991)

1980 Audi Quatro
1980 Audi Quatro
1991 Audi Quatro
1991 Audi Quatro
The Audi Quattro is a road and rally car, produced by Audi, part of the Volkswagen Group. It was first shown at the 1980 Geneva Motor Show on 3 March. Production continued through 1991.

Audi A6/S6 (1994-present)

1994 Audi A6
1994 Audi A6
2012 Audi A6
2012 Audi A6
2016 Audi A6
2016 Audi A6
2017 Audi A6
2017 Audi A6
2019 Audi A6
2019 Audi A6
The Audi A6 is an executive car made by Audi, now in its fifth generation. As the successor to the Audi 100, the A6 is manufactured in Neckarsulm, Germany, and is available in sedan and wagon configurations, the latter marketed by Audi as the Avant. Audi's internal numbering treats the A6 as a continuation of the Audi 100 lineage, with the initial A6 designated as a member of the C4-series, followed by the C5, C6, C7 and the C8. The related Audi A7 is essentially a sportback (fastback) version of the C7-series and C8-series A6, but is marketed under its own separate identity and model designation.
Small Audi Vehicles

Audi Model 60/72/75/80/90 (1965-1972)

F103 is the internal designation for a series of car models produced by Auto Union GmbH (after merger with NSU Motorenwerke in 1969: Audi NSU Auto Union) in West Germany from 1965 to 1972, derived from the earlier DKW F102. To signify the change from a two-stroke to four-stroke engine, the DKW marque was dropped in favor of Audi, a name dormant since before the Second World War. In 1972 the F103 series was discontinued in favor of the "B1" Audi 80.

Audi Model 60 (1968-1972)

1965 Audi Model 60
1968 Audi Model 60
1972 Audi Model 60
1972 Audi Model 60

Audi Model 72 (1965-1969)

1965 Audi Model 72
1965 Audi Model 72
The Audi 75 replaced both the Audi 72 and the Audi 80 from 1969 onwards.

Audi Model 75 (1969-1972)

1969 Audi 75
1969 Audi 75
The Audi 75 replaced both the Audi 72 and the Audi 80 from 1969 onwards.

Audi Super 90 (1966-1972)

1967 Audi Super 90
1967 Audi Super 90
1972 Audi Super 90
1972 Audi Super 90
The Super 90 is a more urgeful version of the original Audi 70, the car Volkswagen have concocted out of the former Auto-Union-D.K.W., with Mercedes four-stroke engine. Using a British industrial process, Audis are assembled at Auto-Union's Ingolstadt works, which is 70% VW owned

Audi Model 80/Fox/4000 (1966-1996)

1973 Audi Fox
1973 Audi Fox
1980 Audi 4000
1980 Audi 4000
2003 Audi Quatro
2003 Audi Quatro
In North America and Australia, the 80 was marketed as the Audi Fox for model years 1973–79, and as the Audi 4000 for model years 1980–87 in the USA. The Audi 90 was an upmarket version of the Audi 80, although all North American sedans of the B4 generation were called Audi 90. The convertible variant was marketed as the Audi Cabriolet. The Audi 75 replaced both the Audi 72 and the Audi 80 from 1969 onwards. In 1972 the F103 series was discontinued in favor of the "B1" Audi 80.

Audi 50 (1974-1978)

1974 Audi 50
1974 Audi 50
1978 Audi 50
1978 Audi 50
The Audi 50 (known internally as the Typ 86) is a supermini economy car produced by Audi from 1974 to 1978, and sold only in Europe. Introduced two or three years after the Italian Fiat 127 and the French Renault 5, the model was seen at the time as Germany's first home grown entrant in Europe's emerging "supermini" class.

Audi A1/S1 (2010-present)

2010 Audi A1
2010 Audi A1
2015 Audi A1
2015 Audi A1
2017 Audi A1
2017 Audi A1
2018 Audi A1
2018 Audi A1
2019 Audi A1
2019 Audi A1
The Audi A1 (internally designated Typ 8X) is a supermini sized launched by Audi at the 2010 Geneva Motor Show. Sales of the initial three door A1 model started in Germany in August 2010, with the United Kingdom following in November 2010. A five-door version, called Sportback, was launched in November 2011, with sales starting in export markets during spring 2012.

Audi A3/S3 (1996-present)

1996 Audi A3
1996 Audi A3
2000 Audi A3 1.8T Quattro
2000 Audi A3 1.8T Quattro
2016 Audi A3 TDI Sportback
2016 Audi A3 TDI Sportback
2017 Audi A3
2017 Audi A3
2019 Audi A3
2019 Audi A3
The Audi A3 is a small family/subcompact executive car manufactured and marketed since 1996 by the Audi subdivision of the Volkswagen Group, now in its third generation.

Audi A4/S4 (1994-present)

1994 Audi A4
1994 Audi A4
2000 Audi A4
2000 Audi A4
2014 Audi A4
2014 Audi A4
2018 Audi A4 2.0T Quattro sedan
2018 Audi A4 2.0T Quattro sedan
2019 Audi A4
2019 Audi A4
The Audi A4 and S4 are a line of compact executive cars produced since 1994 by Audi, a subsidiary of the Volkswagen Group. The A4 has been built in five generations and is based on the Volkswagen Group B platform. The first generation A4 succeeded the Audi 80. The automaker's internal numbering treats the A4 as a continuation of the Audi 80 lineage, with the initial A4 designated as the B5-series, followed by the B6, B7, B8 and the B9. The B8 and B9 versions of the A4 are built on the Volkswagen Group MLB platform shared with many other Audi models and potentially one Porsche model within Volkswagen Group.

Audi A5/S5 (2016-present)

2016 Audi A5 DTM
2016 Audi A5 DTM
2017 Audi A5
2017 Audi A5
2018 Audi A5
2018 Audi A5
2019 Audi A5
2019 Audi A5
The Audi A5 and S5 are a series of compact executive coupe cars produced by Audi since March 2007. The A5 range additionally comprises the coupe, cabriolet, and "Sportback" (a four door features a fastback like roofline with a steeply raked rear window with integrated trunk lid) version of the Audi A4 saloon and estate models. Under Audi's internal platform numbering convention, the A5 is a member of the B-platform series of vehicles, sharing its platform designation with the A4 saloon and Avant.

Audi PHEV (Electric)

Audi A3 Sportback e-tron PHEV (2009-present)

2016 Audi e-tron
2016 Audi e-tron
Field testing in the U.S. began by mid-2012 with a fleet of 17 all-electric A3s. The testing was conducted among Audi's engineers and company employees only. Audi decided to produce only a plug-in hybrid version. Sales across Europe began in August 2014. Deliveries in the U.S. began in December 2015. The first 227 units were registered in Germany in August 2014. As of December 2015, global sales totaled 12,994 units, of which 12,945 units were registered in Europe and 49 units in the United States.

Audi Q7 e-tron PHEV (2009-present)

2018 Audi e-tron
2018 Audi e-tron
The first units of the diesel-powered SUV were registered in Germany in April 2015. Cumulative sales in Germany totaled 344 units through April 2016

Audi Sports Cars

Audi R8 (2006-present)

2006 Audi R8
2006 Audi R8
2010 Audi R8 V10 5.2 FSI
2010 Audi R8 V10 5.2 FSI
2016 Audi R8 V10 Engine Only
2016 Audi R8 V10 Engine Only
2017 Audi R8 Spider
2017 Audi R8 Spider
2019 Audi R8
2019 Audi R8
The car is exclusively designed, developed, and manufactured by Audi AG's private subsidiary company manufacturing high performance automotive parts, Audi Sport GmbH (formerly quattro GmbH), and is based on the Lamborghini Gallardo and presently the Lamborghini Huracán platform. The fundamental construction of the R8 is based on the Audi Space Frame, and uses an aluminum monocoque which is built using space frame principles. The car is built by Audi Sport GmbH in a newly renovated factory at Audi's 'aluminum site' at Neckarsulm in Germany.

Audi TT (1998-present)

1998 Audi TT
1998 Audi TT
1999 Audi TT Roadster
1999 Audi TT Roadster
2017 Audi TT S-Line competition
2017 Audi TT S-Line competition
2018 Audi TT RS
2018 Audi TT RS
2019 Audi TT
2019 Audi TT
The Audi TT is a 2-door sports car marketed by Volkswagen Group subsidiary Audi since 1998, and now in its third generation. The first two generations were assembled by the Audi subsidiary Audi Hungaria Motor Kft. in Győr, Hungary, using bodyshells manufactured and painted at Audi's Ingolstadt plant and parts made entirely by the Hungarian factory for the third generation. For each of its three generations, the TT has been available as a 2+2 coupé and as a two-seater roadster employing consecutive generations of the Volkswagen Group A platform, starting with the A4 (PQ34).

Audi Suv's

Audi e-tron (2018-present)

2019 Audi E-Tron
2019 Audi E-Tron
The Audi e-tron is a fully-electric compact luxury crossover SUV produced by Audi, which was unveiled as a concept car at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show. It is the company's first electric mass production car, and will be launched in early 2019.

Audi Q2 (2017-present)

2017 Audi Q2
2017 Audi Q2
2018 Audi Q2
2018 Audi Q2
2019 Audi Q2
2019 Audi Q2
The Audi Q2 is a mini SUV developed and manufactured by Audi. It was first unveiled to the public on March 1, 2016, at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show. The vehicle, which is being manufactured at the Audi headquarters in Ingolstadt, Germany, is based on Volkswagen's MQB platform. It has been available since November 2016 in Europe. Unlike Audi's other crossovers, the Q2 has not been sold in North America. The Q2 was officially launched in Malaysia in March 2019 where a sole Sport trim line powered by the 1.4 TFSI engine was available.

Audi Q3 (2011-present)

2011 Audi Q3
2011 Audi Q3
2013 Audi Q3 2.0TFSI quattro
2013 Audi Q3 2.0TFSI quattro
2015 Audi Q3
2015 Audi Q3
2018 Audi Q3
2018 Audi Q3
2019 Audi Q3
2019 Audi Q3
The car uses the Volkswagen Group A5 (PQ35) platform of the Volkswagen Golf Mk5, the same as the Volkswagen Tiguan compact SUV. The Q3 slots above the Audi Q2 subcompact crossover SUV. Compared to the compact luxury crossover SUV Q5 and mid-size luxury crossover SUV Q7, which are positioned more for family practicality and off-road performance, the Q3 is aimed as more of a lifestyle/sports automobile. Design and development began following board approval in the second half of 2007. Julian Hoenig's design was chosen for production and frozen in 2009

Audi Q5 (2009-present)

2009 Audi Q5
2009 Audi Q5
2010 Audi Q5
2010 Audi Q5
2018 Audi Q5
2017 Audi Q5
2018 Audi Q5
2018 Audi Q5
2019 Audi Q5
2019 Audi Q5
The Audi Q5 is a series of compact luxury crossover SUVs produced by Audi from 2008. The original first-generation (Typ 8R) model was the third member of the B8 family to be released after the Audi A5 and fourth-generation A4, all being based on the Audi MLB platform.

Audi Q7 (2006-present)

2005 Audi Q7
2005 Audi Q7
2010 Audi Q7
2010 Audi Q7
2017 Audi Q7
2017 Audi Q7
2018 Audi Q7
2018 Audi Q7
2019 Audi Q7
2019 Audi Q7
The Audi Q7 is a full-size luxury crossover SUV made by Audi, unveiled in September 2005 at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Production of this 7-seater SUV began in the autumn of 2005 at the Volkswagen Bratislava Plant in Bratislava, Slovakia. It was the first SUV offering from Audi and went on sale in 2006. Later, Audi's second SUV, the Q5, was unveiled as a 2009 model. Audi has since unveiled a third SUV model, the Q3, which went on sale in the 3rd quarter of 2011. The Q7 shares a Volkswagen Group MLB platform and chassis with the Bentley Bentayga, Lamborghini Urus, Porsche Cayenne and the Volkswagen Touareg

Audi Q8 (2018-present)

2018 Audi Q8
2018 Audi Q8
2019 Audi Q8
2019 Audi Q8
Audi Q8 is a full-size luxury crossover SUV coupé made by Audi that was launched in 2018. It is the flagship of the Audi SUV line, and is being produced at the Volkswagen Bratislava Plant.

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