1948 MG TC

 

MG (Morris Garages) Motor Cars Through the Years

MG Logo

A Pictorial Glimpse at MG Motor Cars Through the Years

Morris Garages (MG Cars) is a previous British sports car maker established in 1924, the founder of the MG brand. In May 2000, The MG brand, alongside the Rover brand to the MG Rover group, when BMW 'broke up' the Rover Group. This course of action saw the return of MG identifications on sportier Rover-based autos, and a revised MG TF, announced in 2002. Although, all production stopped in April 2005 when MG Rover went into bankruptcy.

MG Videos

MG Rover assets were purchased by Chinese carmaker Nanjing Automobile in July 2005 themselves' were acquired by SAIC Motor in 2007, and in early 2009 NAC MG UK Limited was renamed MG Motor UK Limited.

MG Motor UK Limited (MG Motor) is a British automotive company headquartered in Longbridge, Birmingham, United Kingdom, and a subsidiary of SAIC Motor UK, which in turn is owned by the Shanghai-based SAIC Motor. MG Motor designs, develops and markets cars sold under the MG marque. MG Motor is the largest importer of Chinese made cars into the United Kingdom. The marque returned to competitive motorsport in 2012, and won the 2014 British Touring Car Manufacturers Championship.

The 1924 MG 14/28 was the fist model which comprised of a new sporting body mounted on on a Morris Oxford chassis. This model was produced through several redesigns to the Morris. The first auto which can be depicted as a new MG, as opposed to an altered Morris was the 1928 MG 18/80 which had its own designed chassis and the first typical vertical MG grille. In 1929, a smaller auto was produced being the first of a long line of Midgets beginning with the M-Type based upon a 1928 Morris Minor chassis.

In 1936, MG presented the TA which was fitted in both the front and rear with hydraulic shock absorbers. Synchromesh was added to the second through fourth gear, and the hydraulic brakes were added to enhance stopping power 

MG made a name for itself during the early days of global car racing. Starting before and proceeding after World War II, MG created a line of autos known as the T-Series Midgets which, were exported around the world, with greater success than anticipated. Included were the MG TC, MG TD, and MG TF, models all of which were based upon the pre-war MG TB, and redesigned with each successive version.

MG discontinued its Y-Type cantinas and pre-war designs and in 1955 released the MGA. The MGB was announced in 1962 to fulfill demand for a more comfortable and modern sports car. The fixed head coupe (FHC) followed the MGB GT in 1955. With continual redesigns, for the most part to comply with progressively stringent United States safety and emissions standards, the MGB was manufactured until 1980. From 1967 to 1969 a fleeting model called the MGC was built. The MGC was based on the MGB body, although with a larger and, heavier six-cylinder motor, and worse handling to some degree. In 1961, MG began manufacturing the MG Midget. The Midget was a re-badged and marginally restyled second-generation Austin-Healey Sprite. The 1974 MGB was the last model produced with chrome bumpers. The 1974½ featured black rubber bumpers that some asserted ruined the lines of the car, all over new United States safety regulations;

In 1973, the MGB GT V8 was released with the ex-Buick Rover V8 engine and was manufactured until 1976. Likewise with the MGB, the Midget design was as often changed until the Abingdon factory shut down in October 1980 and the remainder of the line was made. The badge was additionally applied to renditions of BMC cantinas including the BMC ADO16, which was produced as a Riley, yet with the MG pitched as somewhat more "sporty".

MG Sports Cars

MG 14/28 (1924-1927)

1924 MG 14/28
1924 MG 14/28
The MG 14/28 Super Sports is a sports car that was launched in 1924. It was the second line of cars produced by W R Morris's MG company. The first line of cars were 1548cc Morris Oxfords fitted with a two-seater body supplied by Charles Raworth & Sons of Oxford. They were built at first in small premises in Alfred Lane, Oxford.

MG M-type Midget (1929–1932)

1936 MG TA
1929 MG M Type
The MG M-type (also known as the MG Midget) is a sports car that was produced by the MG Cars from April 1929 to 1932. It was sometimes referred to as the 8/33. Launched at the 1928 London Motor Show when the sales of the larger MG saloons was faltering because of the economic climate, the small car brought MG ownership to a new sector of the market and probably saved the company

MG C-type Midget (1931–1932)

1931 MG C Type
1931 MG C Type
The MG C-type is a sports car that was produced by MG from 1931 to 1932. It was designed for competition use and based on the M-Type Midget. A special car, EX120 had been developed from the M-Type for George Eyston to make an attempt on the 750 cc class 24-hour record at Autodrome de Montlhéry in France. The attempt was successful and a series of replica cars were made which became the C-Type.

MG D-type Midget (1931–1932)

1931 MG D Type
1931 MG D Type
The MG D-type "Midget" is a sports car that was produced by MG in 1931 and 1932. It used the engine from the MG M-type in the chassis from the MG C-type and was only available as a four-seater. Of the 250 cars produced, 208 were open tourers, 37 were salonettes and five went to external coachbuilders. The car used the M-Type 847 cc engine that was derived from the overhead camshaft engine from the 1928 Morris Minor and Wolseley 10 with a single SU Carburettor producing 27 bhp (20 kW) at 4500 rpm.

MG F-type Magna (1931–1932)

1931 MG F Type Magna
1931 MG F Type Magna
The MG F-type Magna is a six-cylinder-engined car that was produced by MG from October 1931 to 1932. It was also known as the 12/70. Looking for a car to fill the gap between the M-Type Midget and the 18/80, MG turned to another of the engines that had become available from William Morris's acquisition of Wolseley. This was the 1271 cc 6-cylinder version of the overhead camshaft engine used in the 1929 MG M type Midget and previously seen in the 1930 Wolseley Hornet and had dummy side covers to disguise its origins

MG J-type Midget (1932–1934)

1932 MG J Type
1932 MG J Type
The MG J-type is a sports car that was produced by MG from 1932 to 1934. This 2-door sports car used an updated version of the overhead camshaft, crossflow engine, used in the 1928 Morris Minor and Wolseley 10 and previously fitted in the MG M-type Midget of 1929 to 1932, driving the rear wheels through a four-speed non-synchromesh gearbox. The chassis was from the D-Type with suspension by half-elliptic springs and Hartford friction shock-absorbers all round with rigid front and rear axles

MG K-type Magnette (1932–1934)

1932 MG K Type Magnette
1932 MG K Type Magnette
The MG K-type Magnette is a motor car produced in the United Kingdom by MG from October 1932 to 1934. Launched at the 1932 London Motor Show, the K-Type replaced the F-Type Magna but having at first a slightly smaller capacity engine it took the name Magnette. The chassis was similar to the Magna but strengthened and had the track increased by 6 inches (150 mm) to 48 inches (1200 mm) and was available in two lengths with a wheelbase of either 94 inches (2388 mm) or 108 inches (2743 mm).

MG L-type Magna (1933–1934)

1933 MG L Type
1933 MG L Type
The MG L-type is a sports car that was produced by the MG Car company in 1933 and 1934. This 2-door sports car used a smaller version of the 6-cylinder overhead camshaft, crossflow engine which now had a capacity of 1086 cc with a bore of 57 mm and stroke of 71 mm and produced 41 bhp (31 kW) at 5500 rpm. It was previously fitted in the 1930 Wolseley Hornet and the 1931 MG F-type Magna. Drive was to the rear wheels through a four-speed non-synchromesh gearbox. The chassis was a narrower version of that used in the K-type with suspension by half-elliptic springs all round with rigid front and rear axles.

MG N-type Magnette (1934–1936)

1934 MG N-type Magnette
1934 MG N-type Magnette
The MG N-type Magnette is a sports car that was produced by MG from October 1934 to 1936. The car was developed from the K-Type and L-Type but had a new chassis that broke away in design from the simple ladder type used on the earlier cars of the 1930s being wider at the rear than the front and with the body fitted to outriggers off the main frame.

MG P-type Midget 1934–1936)

1934 MG P-type Midget
1934 MG P-type Midget
The MG P-type is a sports car that was produced by MG from 1934 to 1936. This 2-door sports car used an updated version of the overhead camshaft, crossflow engine, used in the 1928 Morris Minor and Wolseley 10 and previously fitted in the J-type Midget of 1932 to 1934, driving the rear wheels through a four-speed non-synchromesh gearbox. The chassis was a strengthened and slightly longer version of that used in the J-type with suspension by half-elliptic springs all round with rigid front and rear axles

MG T Type (1936-1955)

The MG T series is a range of body-on-frame open two-seater sports cars with very little weather protection that were produced by MG from 1936 to 1955. The series included the MG TA, MG TB, MG TC, MG TD, and MG TF Midget models. The last of these models, the TF, was replaced by the MGA. The TF name was reinstated in 2002 on the mid-engined MG TF sports car.

MG TA Midget (1946-1955)

1936 MG TA
1936 MG TA
The TA Midget replaced the PB in 1936. It was an evolution of the previous car and was 3 inches  wider in its track at 45 inches and 7 inches longer in its wheelbase at 94 inches

MG TC (1945-1950)

1948 MG TC, MG RED WITH BISCUIT LEATHER INTERIOR, TAN CANVAS TOP & SIDE CURTAINS, LUCAS 'CATS-EYE' HEADLAMPS, FOG LAMP
1948 MG TC
The TC Midget was the first postwar MG, and was launched in 1945. The TC is quite accurately well known as the (specific) car that caused the Sport Car "craze" in America. It was quite similar to the pre-war TB, sharing the same 1,250 cc (76 cu in) pushrod-OHV engine with a slightly higher compression ratio of 7.4:1 giving 54.5 bhp (40.6 kW) at 5200 rpm.

MG TD (1950-1953)

1950 MG TD  76.3 c.i.d. inline 4 cylinder engine pumped out 54hp. The car weighed in at 2065 pounds.
1950 MG TD
1953 MG TD
1953 MG TD
The 1950 TD Midget announced in January 1950 combined the TC's drive train, a modified hypoid-geared rear axle, the MG Y-type chassis, a familiar T-type style body and independent suspension on front axle using coil springs from the MG Y-type saloon.

MGA (1955-1962)

1955 MGA 1500 Roadster
1955 MGA 1500 Roadster
The 1961 MGA 1600 used the 1588cc engine block from the Twin Cam.
1961 MGA 1600
The MGA is a sports car that was produced by MG from 1955 to 1962. The MGA replaced the MG TF 1500 Midget and represented a complete styling break from MG's earlier sports cars. Announced on 26 September 1955 the car was officially launched at the Frankfurt Motor Show. A total of 101,081 units were sold through the end of production in July 1962, the vast majority of which were exported. Only 5869 cars were sold on the home market, the lowest percentage of any British car. It was replaced by the MGB.

MG MGB (1962-1980)

1973 MGB GT V8
1973 MGB GT V8
1974 MGB Roadster
1974 MGB Roadster
1980 MGB
1980 MGB
The MGB is a two-door sports car manufactured and marketed by the British Motor Corporation (BMC), later the Austin-Morris division of British Leyland, as a four-cylinder, soft-top roadster from 1962 until 1980. Its details were first published on 19 September 1962. Variants include the MGB GT three-door 2+2 coupé (1965–1980), the six-cylinder roadster and coupé MGC (1967–69), and the eight-cylinder 2+2 coupé, the MGB GT V8 (1973–76).

MG Midget (1961-1979)

1961 MG Midget
1961 MG Midget
1973 MG Midget
1973 MG Midget
The MG Midget is a small two-seater sports car produced by MG from 1961 to 1979. It revived a name that had been used on earlier models such as the MG M-type, MG D-type, MG J-type and MG T-type.

MG F (1995-2002) MG TF (2002–2005 & 2007–2011)

1990 MGF
1990 MGF
2000 MG TF
2000 MG TF
The MG F and MG TF are mid-engined, rear wheel drive roadster cars that were sold under the MG marque by three manufacturers between 1995 and 2011. The MG F was the first new model designed as an MG since the MGB that was produced from 1962 to 1980, the marque spent the 1980s being used to denote performance models from then parent Austin Rover Group, and was briefly seen on the MG RV8, a limited edition re-launch of the MG MGB which was sold between 1993 and 1995.

MG XPower SV (2002–2005)

2004 MG XPower SV
2004 MG XPower SV
The MG XPower SV is a sports car that was produced by MG Rover. Manufactured in Modena, Italy and finished at Longbridge, United Kingdom, it was based on the platform of the Qvale Mangusta, formerly the De Tomaso Biguà.

MG Compact

MG KN (1933–1934)

1934 MG KN Magnette
1934 MG KN Magnette
The MG KN Magnette is a coupé that was produced by MG between 1933 and 1934 and was designed to use up surplus bodies made for the unsold MG K-type saloons. These bodies were fitted to the K1 chassis but had the more powerful MG N-type 1271 cc engine. The body had no pillar between the front and rear doors. The front doors were hinged at the windscreen end and closed against the rear doors. To give the impression of being a two-door coupé the rear doors had no external handles. The absence of the central pillar affected the structure of the body and often caused problems. A sun roof was fitted.

MG 1100 (1962–1968)

1962 MG 1100
1962 MG 1100
The BMC ADO16 (Amalgamated Drawing Office project number 16) is a range of small family cars built by the British Motor Corporation (BMC) and, later, British Leyland. Launched in 1962, it was Britain's best-selling car from 1963 to 1966 and from 1968 to 1971. The ADO16 was marketed under various make and model names, however the Austin 1100 and Morris 1100 were the most prolific of all the ADO16 variants. The car was also marketed as the MG: 1100, 1275 and 1300 MG Princess, Sports Sedan, 1100S and MG-S 1300

MG 1300 (1967–1973)

1969 MG 1300 520 Mk.II
1969 MG 1300 520 Mk.II
The BMC ADO16 (Amalgamated Drawing Office project number 16) is a range of small family cars built by the British Motor Corporation (BMC) and, later, British Leyland. Launched in 1962, it was Britain's best-selling car from 1963 to 1966 and from 1968 to 1971. The ADO16 was marketed under various make and model names, however the Austin 1100 and Morris 1100 were the most prolific of all the ADO16 variants. The car was also marketed as the MG: 1100, 1275 and 1300 MG Princess, Sports Sedan, 1100S and MG-S 1300

MG Metro (1982–1990)

1983 MG Metro Turbo
1983 MG Metro Turbo
The Metro is a city car that was produced by British Leyland (BL) and, later, the Rover Group from 1980 to 1998. It was launched in 1980 as the Austin Mini Metro. It was intended to complement and eventually replace the Mini, and was developed under the codename LC8. The Metro was named by What Car? as Car of The Year in 1983 as an MG, and again as a Rover in 1991. During its 18-year lifespan, the Metro wore many names: Austin Metro, MG Metro and Rover Metro. It was re-badged as the Rover 100 series in January 1995. There were also van versions known as the Morris Metro and later, Metrovan.

MG ZR (2001–2005)

2001 MG MG ZR 160
2001 MG MG ZR 160
The MG ZR is an MG branded "hot hatch" version of the Rover 25 supermini class car, produced by MG Rover at their Longbridge plant in Birmingham from 2001 to 2005. Compared to the Rover 25, the ZR featured a number of styling modifications and performance enhancements, such as uprated sports suspension and a less baffled exhaust.

MG 6 (2011–present)

2011 MG 6 1.8 Turbo
2011 MG 6 1.8 Turbo
2015 MG 6
2015 MG 6
2019 MG 6
2019 MG 6
The MG 6 is a compact car which has been produced by the Chinese owned British automotive manufacturer MG Motor since 2010. It is slotted slightly above the compact sedan MG GT, and the compact hatchback MG 5.

MG 5 (2012–present)

2012 MG 5
2012 MG 5
2015 MG 5
2015 MG 5
2017 MG 5
2017 MG 5
The MG 5 is a compact car that has been produced by the British company MG Motor onwards from 2012. It was launched on 28 March 2012 in China, and shares the same automotive platform with the Roewe 350 saloon car. The MG 5 debuted in concept car form at the 2011 Shanghai Auto Show as the MG Concept5.

MG 3 (2013-present)

2013 MG3
2013 MG 3
2018 MG3
2018 MG 3
2019 MG3
2019 MG 3
The MG 3 is a subcompact car produced by the Chinese automotive giant SAIC. The first generation, marketed as the MG 3 SW, is based on the British made Rover Streetwise, which itself was based on the Rover 25, while the second generation, introduced in 2011 is marketed simply as the MG 3. It is the most popular Chinese manufactured car currently on sale in the United Kingdom.

MG GT

2012 MG 350
2012 MG 350
The MG GT is a small sedan, also known as the New MG 5 in some markets, officially debuted in a box on the 2014 Chengdu Auto Show. The MG GT uses the same platform as the earlier MG 5 and subsequently the Roewe 350. Power is provided by 2 different engines: A 1.5L petrol engine producing 105PS & a Turbocharged 1.5L petrol engine producing 130PS.

Midsize cars (Medium saloons)

MG 18/80 (1928–1933)

1928 MG 18/80
1928 MG 18/80
1932 MG 18/80 MG MkII
1932 MG 18/80 MG MkII
The 18/80 MG Six of 1928 was hence the first ‘genuine’ MG with its bespoke chassis and importantly trademark MG radiator surround. Kimber’s marketing chaps made plenty of this fact, stressing it was quite unlike anything on offer from Morris and the only place one could experience the new (almost) 2.5 litre straight six engine.

MG VA (1937–1939)

1937 MG VA
1937 MG VA
1939 MG VA Woodie
1939 MG VA Woodie
The MG VA, or MG 1½-litre as it was originally marketed, is a motor car that was produced by MG between February 1937 and September 1939 and was the smallest of the three sports saloons they produced in the late 1930s, the others being the SA and WA. The car used a tuned version of the push-rod, overhead valve four-cylinder Morris TPBG type engine that was also fitted to the Wolseley 12/48 and Morris Twelve series III.

The MG version had twin SU carburetors and developed 54 bhp (40 kW) at 4500 rpm. Drive was to the live rear axle via a four-speed manual gearbox with synchromesh on the top three ratios, though on some early cars it was only on the top two speeds. Nineteen-inch wire wheels were fitted, and the 10-inch (250 mm) drum brakes were hydraulically operated using a Lockheed system. In-built hydraulic jacks were standard. Suspension was by half-elliptic springs all round with a live rear axle and beam front axle. Luvax shock absorbers were fitted, the rear ones adjustable from the dashboard

MG Y-type (1947–1953)

1947 MG Y Type
1947 MG Y Type
1953 MG Y Type
1953 MG Y Type
The MG Y-Type is an automobile produced by MG in England from 1947 to 1953. It was offered in four-door saloon and limited production open four-seat tourer versions. When production ceased, 8,336 "Y" Types had been produced, 6,131 of which were "YA" saloons, 904 were "YT" Tourers and 1,301 were "YB" saloons.

MG Magnette ZA (1953–1956)

1955 MG Magnette ZA
1955 MG Magnette ZA
The MG Magnette is an automobile that was produced by MG between 1953 and 1968. The Magnette was manufactured in two build series, the ZA and ZB of 1953 through to 1958 and the Mark III and Mark IV of 1959 through to 1968, both using a modified Wolseley body and an Austin engine. MG Cars had previously used the Magnette name on their K-type and N-type models of the 1930s.

MG Magnette ZB (1956–1958)

1957 MG Magnette ZB
1957 MG Magnette ZB
1958 MG Magnette ZB
1958 MG Magnette ZB
The MG Magnette is an automobile that was produced by MG between 1953 and 1968. The Magnette was manufactured in two build series, the ZA and ZB of 1953 through to 1958 and the Mark III and Mark IV of 1959 through to 1968, both using a modified Wolseley body and an Austin engine. MG Cars had previously used the Magnette name on their K-type and N-type models of the 1930s.

MG Magnette Mk. III (1959–1961)

1959 MG Magnette MkIII
1959 MG Magnette MkIII
1961 MG Magnette MkIII
1961 MG Magnette MkIII
The MG Magnette is an automobile that was produced by MG between 1953 and 1968. The Magnette was manufactured in two build series, the ZA and ZB of 1953 through to 1958 and the Mark III and Mark IV of 1959 through to 1968, both using a modified Wolseley body and an Austin engine. MG Cars had previously used the Magnette name on their K-type and N-type models of the 1930s.

MG Magnette Mk. IV (1961–1968)

1962 MG Magnette MkIV
1962 MG Magnette MkIV
1967 MG Magnette MkIV
1967 MG Magnette MkIV
The MG Magnette is an automobile that was produced by MG between 1953 and 1968. The Magnette was manufactured in two build series, the ZA and ZB of 1953 through to 1958 and the Mark III and Mark IV of 1959 through to 1968, both using a modified Wolseley body and an Austin engine. MG Cars had previously used the Magnette name on their K-type and N-type models of the 1930s.

MG Maestro (1983–1991)

1983 MG Maestro 1600
1983 MG Maestro 1600
1989 MG Maestro 509 Turbo
1989 MG Maestro 509 Turbo
The Austin Maestro is a five-door hatchback small family car (and two-door van derivative) that was produced from 1982 to 1987 by British Leyland, and from 1988 until 1994 by Rover Group. The car was produced at Morris' former Oxford plant, also known as Cowley. Today, the redeveloped factory produces the BMW Mini. An MG-branded performance version was sold as the MG Maestro from 1983 until 1991. Although later models were sometimes referred to as the Rover Maestro, the model never wore the Rover badge. A three-box (non-hatchback) car, the Montego, was a derivative of the Maestro.

MG Montego (1985–1991)

1990 MG Montego EFi Turbo
1990 MG Montego EFi Turbo
The Austin Montego is a British family car that was produced by British Leyland from 1984 until 1988, and then by Rover Group from 1988 until 1995. The Montego was the replacement for both the rear-wheel-drive Morris Ital and the front-wheel-drive Austin Ambassador ranges to give British Leyland an all-new competitor for the Ford Sierra and Vauxhall Cavalier. On its launch, it was sold as an Austin and also an MG, and was the last new car to be launched with the use of the Austin marque. From 1988, it was sold without a marque following the phasing out of the Austin name

MG ZS (2001–2005)

2001 MG ZS
2001 MG ZS
2005 MG ZS
2005 MG ZS
The MG ZS is a sports family car that was built by MG Rover from 2001 until 2005. The ZS is essentially a tuned version of the Rover 45 (which was launched in 1999). The 45 in turn is a face lifted version of the Rover 400 which was launched in hatchback form in 1995 and saloon form in 1996. The earlier version of the 400 (Rover 400 Mk 1) was significantly different to the Mk 2 model. The 45 (Mk 1) had no parts based on the Mk 1 400.

MG 7 (2007–2013)

2008 MG 7
2008 MG 7
The MG7 is a mid-size sports saloon that was built by Chinese carmaker MG Motor, derived from the British cars, Rover 75 and MG ZT. Production started in March 2007. The MG7 received praise from British car magazine Auto Express, who test drove it in May 2008, although it has not officially been sold in the United Kingdom. The MG7 came in two variants, the first which resembles the Mark I MG ZT, with twin front lights, and the second which resembles the Mark II Rover 75 V8. A long wheelbase version, called the MG7L, features the deeper radiator grille of the Rover 75 V8

Full-size cars (Large saloons)

MG 14/40 (1927-1929)

2012 MG 5
1929 MG 14/40 Tourer MKIV
The MG 14/40 or MG 14/40 Mark IV is a tourer car that was made by MG and launched in 1927. It was based on the contemporary Morris Oxford flatnose and was a development of the MG 14/28 and was built at Edmund Road, Cowley, Oxford where MG had moved in September 1927. During production it became the first model to carry an MG Octagon badge on its radiator, the previous cars had retained a Morris Oxford badge.

MG SA (1936–1939)

1936 MG SA 2-Litre 4-Door Sports Saloon
1936 MG SA 2-Litre 4-Door Sports Saloon
1939 MG SA 4-Door Sports Saloon
1939 MG SA 4-Door Sports Saloon
The MG SA or MG 2-litre is a sporting saloon that was produced by MG from 1936 to 1939. Launched as the 2 litre, it only later became known as the SA, the car had been originally planned as an advanced performance saloon to rival the likes of SS Cars (later to be known as Jaguar) and even Bentley with all independent suspension and was given the factory code of EX150 and designated the S-type. A prototype was made but with the amalgamation of MG with Morris Motors in 1935 development stopped. The Cowley drawing office picked up the project again but a much more conservative car appeared with conventional live rear and beam front axles.

MG WA (1938–1939)

1938 MG WA Sports Saloon
1938 MG WA Sports Saloon
1939 MG WA Cabrolet
1939 MG WA Cabrolet
The MG WA is a sporting saloon that was produced by MG between 1938 and 1939 and was at the time the largest and heaviest car the company had built. Although similar to the SA the car had a wider track at the rear allowing a larger body to be fitted. The car used a tuned version of the six-cylinder Morris QPHG engine enlarged to 2561 cc. The compression ratio was increased to 7.25 to 1 and a new balanced crankshaft was fitted. Drive was to the live rear axle via a four-speed manual gearbox with synchromesh on the top three ratios and a divided propshaft. Wire wheels were fitted and the 14 inch drum brakes were hydraulically operated using a Lockheed system.

MG ZT (2001–2005)

2001 MG ZT Saloon
2001 MG ZT Saloon
2005 MG ZT Saloon
2005 MG ZT Saloon
The MG ZT is an automobile which was produced by MG Rover from 2001 to 2005. It was offered in saloon and estate versions, the latter designated as the MG ZT-T. Styling is similar to the Rover 75, upon which it was based, although various modifications, most noticeably the wheels and tires, make for a far sportier ride. Production ceased in April 2005, amidst financial turmoil at MG Rover.

MG SUVs

MG GS SUV (2015-present)

2015 MG GS
2015 MG GS
2017 MG GS
2017 MG GS
2019 MG GS
2019 MG GS
The MG GS is MG's first production SUV launched in 2015, with sales in the UK commencing in June 2016. The MG GS features front wheel drive and all wheel drive variants. The MG GS starts at £14,995, with a 1.5 litre turbo gasoline engine delivering 166 PS and 250NM Torque. The top of the range model also comes with the option of a 7 speed automatic transmission.

MG ZS (2017-present)

2017 MG ZS
2017 MG ZS
2018 MG ZS
2018 MG ZS
2019 MG ZS
2019 MG ZS
The MG ZS is a sports utility vehicle (SUV) produced by the Chinese owned, British automotive marque MG Motor. The MG ZS is the second SUV to be produced by MG Motor, the first being the larger MG GS, which was launched in April 2015. The MG ZS notably revives the name previously used on the MG ZS saloon, which was based on the Rover 45, and was produced by MG Motor's predecessors MG Rover from 2001 to 2005.

MG HS (2018-present)

2018 MG HS
2018 MG HS
2019 MG HS
2019 MG HS
The MG HS is a compact crossover manufactured by Chinese manufacturer SAIC group under the MG Motor brand. The MG HS is the production version of the MG X-motion concept. It debuted at the 2018 Beijing Auto Show, alongside the Roewe Marvel X

MG Concept Vehicles

MG Concept

2014 MG EV Concept
2014 MG EV Concept
2016 MG BGT Concept
2016 MG BGT Concept

Get Your Very Own MG Scale Models
1947 MG TC Midget Scale Model Shown
1947 MG TC Midget Scale Model Shown
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    MG (Morris Garages) Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5