Cokin Filters

Cokin Filter System

The Cokin System consists of filter holders, filter rings and the actual filters. The filters and holders come in four different sizes, A Series, P Series, Z-Pro Series and X-Pro Series. Adapter rings are sized from 36mm to 112mm. You buy a filter holder, the filters you want and adapters for each filter thread you are going to use the filter with. Cokin Filters are mostly made from organic glass, which is shock-proof, resistant to abrasion, and meets all necessary optical and chemical requirements. Organic glass is made from CR39. The CR stands for Columbia Resin. All Cokin filters are on this page.
Cokin Filters

Ultraviolet Filters Your camera won't allow you to develop clear, crisp photos if your camera lens is damaged or dirty. You can protect your thousand dollar lens with a $20 filter if you use a UV or haze filter. These thin glass filters are designed to screw onto the end of your camera lens and you can just leave them on to protect your lens. UV filters can help protect your lenses from dust, moisture and scratches. If your lens is damaged it could cost you quite a bit to repair or replace it. The filters can also give you added benefits of correction for Ultraviolet light which can show on your film as a bluish cast and can sometimes distort distant details. UV filters let you correct for the UV effect to varying degrees. They are also useful if you are shooting mountain and marine scenes, as the haze could affect the color and clarity of the photos. UV filters can be bought for about $20.

Haze Filters Haze Filters do just what they sound like, they filter out haze which is created by minute particles of vapor and dust. Haze settles in the atmosphere and can affect distant photographic scenes. Haze forms when sunlight is scattered by minute particles of matter that exist in the air. Atmospheric conditions have an effect on the amount of haze in the air. Mist, fog, smog, smoke and clouds are all different than haze. Green and red light are scattered by haze, but not as much as ultraviolet radiation, violet and blue light. If you use filters to absorb scattered sunlight you can penetrate the haze. Any filter that can absorb scattered sunlight can be considered a haze filter.

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Cokin UVN 230 Resin Filter. By the sea, in the mountains, beneath the tropical sun your skin picks up flattering colors. · Your photos, however, pick up mostly blue casts due to Ultra Violet (UV) rays. · Cokin Skylight and UV filters eliminate these casts and clarify distant haze.

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Cokin UVY 231 Filter. Skylight filter #230 reduces UV rays and distance haze, and reduces blue cast approx 1/10th of a stop.

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Cokin 232 1B Skylight Filter. Skylight filter(1B)#232 is the same as #230 except it reduces blue 2/10th of a stop and is recommended for high altitude and "sky" shots.

Polarizing Filters
These filters are used to reduce or eliminate reflections. They are ideal for photographing through glass or water as the glare from water tends to be white. Polarizing filters can also reduce the effects of haze and darken the blue sky image in black and white and color photography. There are various polarizing filters available to increase color saturation in a photo without altering the hues of image colors, but there are only two principal styles. One style fits over your camera lens, while the other is made to be used over the source of light. They don't affect color, that's why polarizing filters and screens are used in both black and white and color photography. There are two pieces to a polarizer. The front part rotates so you can change the angle of polarization. If you look at the blue sky through a polarizer and rotate it, the sky appears to get darker and then lighter. These filters range in price from about $15 to $800. They come in various sizes.
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Cokin 160 - Linear Polarizer Filter.  Linear polarizers are used with most manual focus cameras and are not recommended for auto-focus cameras. This filter rotates within the holder. PLEASE NOTE: All auto-focus and certain manual focus cameras require circular polarizers. Consult your instruction manual.

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Cokin 164 - Circular Polarizer Filter. Available in Series : A - P - X-PRO-Z-PRO & in screw-in Filter.

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Cokin Polacolor Red 161 Filter. Available in Series : A - P.

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Cokin Polacolor Blue 162 Filter. Available in Series : A - P.

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Cokin Polacolor Yellow 163 Filter. Available in Series : A - P.

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Cokin Varicolor Red/Green 170 Filter. In one orientation it is a heavy red filter, turn it 90 degrees and it is a heavy green filter. What I had expected was a more subtle slide between colors or even a left-right dichotomy. But, no, just two heavy color filters. Maybe it would be handy for black-and-white, who knows?  Available in Series : A - P.

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Cokin Varicolor Red/Blue 171 Filter. Crazy filter. you can create very wild images and with the ease of the cokin system it is very easy to dial in the right amount of polarization. Varicolor Red/Blue Filter for applying red and blue coloring based on polarized light - for example coloring the sky one color and the clouds another. Beware, the combination of the filter and the required circular polarizer loses 4-6 stops of light; the color effects generated by this combination are worth it! Available in Series : A - P - X.

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Cokin Varicolor Pink/Orange 172 Filter. Available in Series : A - P.

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Cokin Varicolor Blue/Yellow 173 Filter. This is a great polarizer that allows you to emphasize blues and yellows/browns simultaneously, for example, a brick building against blue sky or beach scene. It can also distort colors, your choice. This filter allows one to create anything from dramatic to subtle changes in the sky and background. It helps to create the "feel" of a scene that might be difficult to really nail down otherwise. Available in Series : A - P -X-PRO-Z-PRO.

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Cokin X-Pro 174 Polarizer Blue/Lime Glass Filter. If you combine a Variocolor with a Neutral Polarizer, you can vary the intensity by rotating the Neutral Polarizer. For example, depending on the relative rotation of the VarioColor Blue/Lime filter and the Neutral Polarizer, the reflections become either a blue tint or a lime tint. The effect can be seen through the viewfinder and varies according to how the filter is rotated and its orientation to the sun.

 

Neutral Density Filters These filters are designed to reduce the amount of light coming through your camera lens without changing the color. Neutral density filters can reduce the assorted colors of light in the spectrum. White and colored light is transmitted through these filters and only the intensity of the light is affected. These filters are used with black and white and color film. If you have set your camera to its fastest shutter speed along with the smallest f/stop, but still can't take the photo without overexposing the film, you can use one of these filters to reduce the exposure further. The filters help to eliminate bright, washed out sections of a photo. Neutral density filters usually range in price from about $10 to $350. They are available in various sizes.

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Cokin 152 Gray Neutral Density (ND) 2x Resin Filter. Neutral Density filters have several uses and offer the possibility to achieve otherwise unachievable results. ND filters appear grey and reduce the amount of light reaching the film. They have no effect on color balance.

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Cokin 153 Gray Neutral Density (ND) 4x Resin Filter. Available in Series : A - P - Z-PRO - X-PRO & in screw-in Filter.

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Cokin 154 Gray Neutral Density (ND) 8x Resin Filter. Available in Series : A - P - Z-PRO. Cokin 154 (exposure adjustment = approx. 3 stops, reduces ISO to 1/8)

Cokin 156 Neutral Density NDX Resin Filter. For use in bright light without altering colors, the COKIN Neutral Density NDX Filter will allow you to photograph very bright subjects such as solar events.

Graduated Filters
Cooling Filters
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Cokin 020 80A Color Conversion Resin Filter.  The Cokin 020 80A Color Conversion Resin Filter is blue. It is used to balance daylight film under artificial, tungsten or standard (household) incandescent lighting. This filter allows you to "balance", i.e. bring back, correct color tone to your images. There is some loss of film speed that may require the use of a tripod but, at least, your photos will demonstrate the proper tonality they so richly deserve. 

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Cokin 021 80B (Blue) Color Conversion Resin Filter.

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Cokin 022 80C Color Conversion Filter.

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Cokin 023 82A (Blue) Color Conversion Resin Filter.

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Cokin 024 82B (Blue) Color Conversion Resin Filter.

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Cokin 025 82C Color Conversion Resin Filter.

Warming Filters
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Cokin 026 81A (Warm) Color Conversion Resin Filter. The 81 Series of filters control the bluish coloration that affects daylight film. The mild 81A warms scenes shot on cloudy days. It can also remove excessive blue from the effects of electronic flash. Good for general scenics when you wishe to remove the bluish cast from open shade or just add warmth to the photograph.

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Cokin 027 81B (Warm) Color Conversion Filter. The stronger 81B warms scenes shot on overcast days more than an 81A. It can also remove more excessive blue from the effects of electronic flash. Good for general scenics when the photographer wishes to remove the bluish cast from open shade or add even more warmth to the photograph than with an 81A.

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Cokin 028 81C (Warm)Color Conversion Resin Filter. An 81C will render skin tones nearly normal as well as eliminate the stronger bluishness of open shade on very clear days. The 81C is slightly stronger than an 81B and is also used for general landscape photography on cloudy days as well as to add additional warmth in portrait photography.

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Cokin 035 81D Color Conversion Resin Filter. The 81D is stronger than an 81C and is also used for general landscape photography on cloudy days as well as to add more of a "suntanned look" in portrait photography. An 81D filter will more than replace the yellow missing from the image and place all skin tones on a "warmish" level.

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Cokin 037 Warming (81EF) Resin Filter. An 81EF filter (the strongest in the 81 series) will more than replace the yellow missing from the image and place all skin tones on a distinctly "warmish" level. You might even consider using an 81EF at the beach to make a hot scene even "hotter". 

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Cokin 039 Warm (81Z) Resin Filter. The 81 Series of filters control the bluish coloration that affects daylight film. They can also remove excessive blue from the effects of electronic flash. Good for general scenics when you wish to remove the bluish cast from open shade or just add warmth to the photograph, with an 81EF having the greatest effect.

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Cokin 029 85A (Orange) Color Conversion Resin Filter. Using tungsten film in daylight will produce a bluish cast in the photograph. The 85 series will produce natural colors when shooting with tungsten film outdoors. A #85 filter will decrease the color temperature from 5500K to 3400K and produce slightly cooler results than an 85B.

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Cokin 030 85B Color Conversion Resin Filter. An 85B filter converts tungsten film to daylight. An 85C produces the coolest results - more than either the 85 or 85B. However, it is interesting to remember that an 85C is also useful as a creative warming filter with daylight film in daylight.

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Cokin 031 85C Color Conversion Filter. An 85B filter converts tungsten film to daylight. An 85C produces the coolest results - more than either the 85 or 85B. However, it is interesting to remember that an 85C is also useful as a creative warming filter with daylight film in daylight.

 Diffusion filters are used to create soften images. A diffusion filter diffuses strong light without affecting the sharpness and contrast of the image. Thus, it is different from the effect of out of focus. Diffusion filters are mainly used in portrait work. In general, small skin defects can be eliminated almost completely, and facial contrast and wrinkles are soften. To create a better result, the aperture should be opened up so that the subject can stand out well against the background
Cokin Colored Diffusers
Color Diffuser 082

Cokin 082 Diffuser Effect Filter. Set of two metallized films with different and variable colors to create a romantic diffusion. The more the filter is «wrinkled», the more intense is the diffusion. To use with a COKIN Gelatine-holder (ref.194, not included). Sizes available • A Series • P Series Check availability & current prices at

Cold Color Diffuser 088

Cokin 088 Color Diffuser Blue Resin Filter. Controls bright lights, and surrounds your subjects with a soft and gentle atmosphere. Lends your pictures those blue tones beneficial to portraits and still-life work. Sizes available • A Series • P Series •

Cold Color Diffuser 089

Cokin 089 Warm Color Diffuser Resin Filter. Controls bright lights, and surrounds your subjects with a soft and gentle atmosphere. Lends your pictures orange tones. Sizes available • A Series • P Series •

Sunsoft 694

Cokin 694 Sunsoft Resin Filter.  A diffuser filter combined with a strong warm-up effect similar to suntan. Ideal for professional Portrait Sizes available • A Series • P Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series  •

Champagne 695

Cokin 695 Champagne Resin Filter. A diffuser filter combined with flesh dye. Sizes available • A Series • P Series •

SoftWarm 696

Cokin 696 Soft Warm Effect Resin Filter.  Mixing of warm tone 027 and light diffuser 820. Great for portrait as it corrects the small defects of the skin. The diffusion effect is subbtle so that you don’t realize a filter was used. Sizes available • A Series • P Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series

Cokin Diffuser and Pastel filters bring a gentle and romantic atmosphere to your photos. They allow a more gentle and subtle interpretation of your subjects, far removed from aggressive lighting, bright color and the opposition of contrasts. The effect of Diffuser and Pastel filters may be described as follows: softens, controls, diminishes, blurs, filters....
Cokin Colorless Diffusers
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Cokin 820 Diffuser (Light Effect) Resin Filter. The lightest diffuser. Improves the skin grain without showing the use of filter. For professional use. Sizes available • A Series • P Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series.

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Cokin 083/830 Diffuser 1 Effect Resin Filter. Diffuses strong light without affecting the clarity of the image up to about 135 mm focal length and eliminates small skin defects. Ideal for portrait and still-life work. Sizes available • A Series • P Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series •

Cokin 084/840 Diffuser 2 Effect Resin Filter. More accentuated effect than 830. Sizes available • A Series • P Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series.

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Cokin 085 Diffuser 3 Effect Resin Filter. Strong diffusion effect. Ideal for nude photography and romantic shots.• Sizes available A Series • P Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series •

Cokin Pastels
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Cokin 086 Pastel 1 Resin Filter.  Softens the image by applying a white dream touch. Gives a nice romantic atmosphere which enhances the photograph. Great for shooting people in outdoor scenery - density 1 Sizes available • A Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series •

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Cokin 087 Pastel 2 Resin Filter. Softens the image by applying a white dream touch. Gives a nice romantic atmosphere which enhances the photograph. Great for shooting people in outdoor scenery - density 2.  Sizes available • A Series • P Series • Z-Pro Series • X-Pro Series •

Cokin Netties
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Cokin 142 Net #1 White Resin Filter.  Cokin Net filters consist of a net-like pattern on clear optical resin. This creates a diffusion effect, minimizing unwanted details while maintaining image clarity. Ideal for portraits with best results achieved when larger apertures are used. 

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Cokin 143 Net #1 Black Resin Filter. The Cokin 143 Net #1 Black Resin Filter is available in grades 1 and 2, with #2 having the greater effect. The black net filter softens fine details with no change in contrast, while the white net filters not only soften details BUT also lower contrast.

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Cokin 144 Net #2 White Filter. 

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Cokin 145 Net #2 Black Filter.

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Cokin 148 Wedding Filter 1 White Kit. The Cokin 148 Wedding #1 White filter creates a softer image in the lower third of the image and up along part of both vertical edges. If the bride is seated while wearing a bright, white gown, the lower half of the image covering the gown will be slightly softened while the upper areas of the frame remain neutral. 

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Cokin 149 Wedding #1 Black Resin Filter. This Filter uses an old Hollywood technique. As is the case with the Wedding #1 White filter, only the lower third of the image is affected. The black net creates a diffusion effect, minimizing unwanted details while maintaining image clarity. It is ideal for portraits with best results achieved when larger apertures are used.

Color Enhancing Filters
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Cokin 046 FL-W Fluorescent to Daylight Correction Resin Filter. An FL-D filter is used when you wish to correct for the greenish tone that appears when shooting daylight film under general purpose fluorescent lighting. An FL-B filter is used to correct the color balance when shooting tungsten film under fluorescent lighting.

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Cokin 036 FL-W Fluorescent to Daylight Correction Resin Filter. An FL-W filter is used to balance daylight film under warm white or white type fluorescent lamps.

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Cokin 005 Sepia Special Color Effect Resin Filter. The Cokin 005 Sepia Special Color Effect Resin Filter gives an overall nostalgic, "Turn of the Century", look to otherwise ordinary color photographs by tinting them with an antique (brownish) hue. In this way, your photos will take on the look of having been shot many years ago in black and white.

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Cokin 045 Sepia (Light) Special Color Effect Resin Filter. Gives an overall nostalgic, "Turn of the Century", look to otherwise ordinary color photographs by tinting them with an antique (brownish) hue. In this way, your photos will take on the look of having been shot many years ago in Black and White. The Cokin 005 is also a sepia filter but has a greater effect. 

Color Filters for Black & White Film

Infrared Filters Infrared filters are made to block mid infrared wavelengths while allowing visible light to pass through. They are sometimes referred to as heat absorbing filters and are ideal at cutting through haze. These types of filters are commonly used to prevent unnecessary heating in items which have bright incandescent light bulbs. Examples of such devices are slide projectors and overhead projectors. You can also get near infrared filters. These types of filters commonly are used in video cameras to compensate for the high sensitivity of the camera's sensors to near-infrared light. Infrared filters can range in price from about $20 to $450. They come in various sizes, styles and brands.

Cokin 007 89B Infrared Resin Filter. For black and white infrared film when you only want to transmit the infrared spectrum and none of the visible spectrum.

   

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Camera filters are transparent or translucent optical elements that alter the properties of light entering the camera lens for the purpose of improving the image being recorded. Filters can affect contrast, sharpness, highlight flare, color, and light intensity, either individually, or in various combinations. They can also create a variety of "special effects." It is important to recognize that, even though there are many possibly confusing variations and applications, all filters behave a reasonably predictable way when their properties are understood and experienced. Most of these properties related similarly to filter use in both film and video imaging. The following will explain the basic optical characteristics of certain types of camera filters, as well as their applications. It is a foundation upon which to build by experience. Textual data cannot fully inform. There is always something new out there.

In their most successful applications, filter effects blend in with the rest of the image to help get the message across. Use caution when using a filter in a way that draws attention to itself as an effect. Combined with all the other elements of image-making, filters make visual statements, manipulate emotions and thought, and make believable what otherwise would not be. They get the viewer involved.

Filter Planning
Filter effects can become a key part of the "look" of a production, if considered in the planning stages. They can also provide a crucial last-minute fix to unexpected problems, if you have them readily available. Where possible, it is best to run advance tests for pre-conceived situations when time allows.

Filter Factors
Many filter types absorb light that must be compensated for when calculating exposure. These are supplied with either a recommended "filter factor" or a "stop value." Filter factors are multiples of the unfiltered exposure. Stop values are added to the stop to be set without the filter. Multiple filters will add stop values. Since each stop added is a doubling of the exposure, a filter factor of 2 is equal to a one stop increase. Example: three filters of one stop each will need three additional stops, or a filter factor of 2x2x2= 8 times the unfiltered exposure.

When in doubt in the field about compensation needed for a filter that you have no information on, you might use your light meter with the incident bulb removed. If you have a flat diffuser, use it, otherwise just leave the sensor bare. Aim it at an unchanging light source of sufficient intensity. On the ground, face up at a blank sky can be a good field situation. Make a reading without the filter. Watch out for your own shadow. Make a reading with the filter covering the entire sensor. No light should enter from the sides. The difference in the readings is the compensation needed for that filter. You could also use a spot meter, reading the same bright patch, with similar results. There are some exceptions to this depending on the filter color, the meter sensitivity, and the target color, but this is often better than taking a guess.

Filter Grades
Many filter types are available in a range of "grades" of differing strengths. This allows the extent of the effect to be tailored to suit various situations. The grade numbering range can vary with the effect type, and generally, the higher the number, the stronger the effect. Unless otherwise stated, there is no mathematical relationship between the numbers and the strengths. A grade 4 is not twice the strength of a grade 2. A grade 1 plus a grade 4 doesn't add up to a grade 5.