B+W Filters

Founded in Berlin in 1947 B+W has succeeded in establishing itself as one of the worlds leading filter manufacturers. Using only the highest quality materials and state of the art production equipment – B+W products deliver the best quality photographic filters available in the market today. B+W has also pioneered the way in filter surface coating technology – with its Multi Resistant Coating (MRC) providing highly advanced reflection reduction and top quality protection against scratching, dirt and moisture.
B+W Filters
  Protection Filters - Ultraviolet Filters Your camera won't allow you to develop clear, crisp photos if your camera lens is damaged or dirty. You can protect your thousand dollar lens with a $20 filter if you use a UV or haze filter. These thin glass filters are designed to screw onto the end of your camera lens and you can just leave them on to protect your lens. UV filters can help protect your lenses from dust, moisture and scratches. If your lens is damaged it could cost you quite a bit to repair or replace it. The filters can also give you added benefits of correction for Ultraviolet light which can show on your film as a bluish cast and can sometimes distort distant details. UV filters let you correct for the UV effect to varying degrees. They are also useful if you are shooting mountain and marine scenes, as the haze could affect the color and clarity of the photos. UV filters can be bought for about $20.

Haze Filters Haze Filters do just what they sound like, they filter out haze which is created by minute particles of vapor and dust. Haze settles in the atmosphere and can affect distant photographic scenes. Haze forms when sunlight is scattered by minute particles of matter that exist in the air. Atmospheric conditions have an effect on the amount of haze in the air. Mist, fog, smog, smoke and clouds are all different than haze. Green and red light are scattered by haze, but not as much as ultraviolet radiation, violet and blue light. If you use filters to absorb scattered sunlight you can penetrate the haze. Any filter that can absorb scattered sunlight can be considered a haze filter.

B+W Natural Clear 007 Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filte B+W Natural Clear 007 Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter. A B&W 46mm Clear (Colorless) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter is for color as well as black and white films. It also serves as a permanent lens protector. The value of a clear filter covering a lens has been well-documented over the years. How many stories have we all heard about photographers dropping lenses and smashing front elements? With a front lens protection filter on, the chances of preserving the valuable glass in your lens increases many fold. Shall we call it a form of inexpensive insurance?
B+W #007 Protection Clear MRC (Multi-Coated) Glass Slim Filter. B+W #007 Protection Clear MRC (Multi-Coated) Glass Slim Filter.
B+W Skylight KR-1.5 Filter (1A) B+W Skylight KR-1.5 Filter (1A). This filter also blocks UV radiation, however it also has a delicate reddish-yellow tone designed to counter-act the high blue cast in the shadow portions of color photographs caused by light coming from a blue sky. It produces a warmer image tone and reduces the haze in distant scenes. The exposure factor amounts to only ¡.¡, so for practical purposes it can be ignored. Because of its very faint color, a Skylight Filter can be kept on a lens constantly for protection, as long as a slightly warmer color rendition is desired, as it would be with color reversal films that tend to produce cooler colors.
B+W Skylight 1A (KR-1.5) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter B+W Skylight 1A (KR-1.5) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter.
B+W UV Black (403) Filter B+W UV Black (403) Filter. Not to be confused with UV-blocking filters that photographers normally refer to as “UV Filters”, this one passes UV A radiation (320 to 385 nm), but blocks visible light and looks pitch-black to our eyes. It is used with appropriately sensitized films in such applications as ultraviolet reflection photography in forensics or in materials research, but also as filters on UV-emitters for fluorescence photography. Depending on the illumination and on the film’s sensitization, its filter factor is in the range of 8 to 20.
B+W UV Haze 010 F-Pro Filter B+W UV Haze 010 F-Pro Filter This UV Filter blocks the invisible UV component of light from the sky, which can cause blur and to which many color films react with a blue cast. These filters should be called UV-Blocking Filters, because there are filters for technical applications that pass UV radiation and block all the other wavelengths. Nevertheless, the short term “UV Filter” has become established among photographers. UV Filters are ideal for photography in high altitudes (in the mountains), by the sea and in regions with very clean air. The pictures gain brilliance and disturbing blue casts are avoided. Because the glass is colorless, color rendition is not altered, aside from the elimination of the unwanted blue cast, and no increase in exposure is required. That makes a UV Filter very suitable as protection of the front element of the taking lens against dust, flying sand, sea water spray and the like, and it can be kept on the lens at all times. It is recommended for analog color- and black-and-white- as well as digital photography. UV Filters from B+W are also available in SLIM mounts for wide-angle photography without vignetting. Other UV-blocking filters with special characteristics.
B+W UV Haze 010 Filter (Extra Wide) B+W UV Haze 010 Filter (Extra Wide).. The filter ring is made from brass yielding a stronger product. Brass filter rings are also less prone to jamming. In addition, the seal between the glass and filter ring is exceptionally strong giving the filter added strength and durability. The excellent Schott Glass used in the manufacturing of this filter is legendary and synonymous with the highest standards of filter production. It comes with a solid 10-year warranty. The MRC coating on this filter adds to its durability - particularly under less than optimal weather conditions. In addition, the hard coating makes cleaning the filter easier - especially when it comes to removing fingerprints or surface dirt. Moreover, this filter benefits users of digital cameras whose shorter focal length lenses are more susceptible to dirt and other contaminants on the front lens element.

Multicoated to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. B&W Extra-Wide's are special filters for wide-angle lenses. In order to prevent vignetting, the accessory thread on the front is larger.

B+W Ultraviolet (UV) Filter (Slim) B+W Ultraviolet (UV) Filter (Slim) The filter ring is made from brass yielding a stronger product. Brass filter rings are also less prone to jamming. In addition, the seal between the glass and filter ring is exceptionally strong giving the filter added strength and durability. The excellent Schott Glass used in the manufacture of this filter is legendary and synonymous with the highest standards of filter production. It comes with a solid 10-year warranty. Note! B&W slim filters are for wide-angle lenses and are 3mm thick. They do not have a front thread. C
B+W UV Haze 010 Filter (Slim) B+W UV Haze 010 Filter (Slim) The filter ring is made from brass yielding a stronger product. Brass filter rings are also less prone to jamming. In addition, the seal between the glass and filter ring is exceptionally strong giving the filter added strength and durability. The excellent Schott Glass used in the manufacturing of this filter is legendary and synonymous with the highest standards of filter production. It comes with a solid 10-year warranty. The MRC coating on this filter adds to its durability - particularly under less than optimal weather conditions. In addition, the hard coating makes cleaning the filter easier - especially when it comes to removing fingerprints or surface dirt. Moreover, this filter benefits users of digital cameras whose shorter focal length lenses are more susceptible to dirt and other contaminants on the front lens element. Multicoated to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. B&W slim filters are for wide-angle lenses and are 3mm thick. They do not have a front thread.
B+W UV-415 (2B) UV-Blocking Filter B+W UV-415 (2B) UV-Blocking Filter - This sharp-cutting, nearly colorless B+W filter blocks UV radiation up to the limit of visible light. It is used in ultraviolet fluorescence photography for the prevention of unsharpness caused by the intense UV illumination (which is due to chromatic aberration in the UV range). It can also prevent the fluorescence that may occur in the cement between lens elements. Because of the usually rather colorful fluo-rescent subjects, the delicate yellow cast in.
B+W 420 UV-Blocking Glass Filter B+W 420 UV-Blocking Glass Filter - This even more stringent UV-blocking filter behaves like the filter 4¡5 described above, except that its filtering slope completely blocks the UV radiation all the way into the visible violet region. As a result, it has a noticeably yellow tint. It is used for fluorescence photography on black-and-white film, where it is even more effective. Its filter factor is 1.2.
B+W Ultraviolet (UV) Filter B+W Ultraviolet (UV) Filter A UV filter is the best available protection for the front element of your lens. A lens that accidentally gets dropped on its front element while hiking can potentially be saved by purchasing this item. Some people refer to them as "cheap insurance". Aside from that more-than-significant benefit, UV filters cut through some of the haze in the atmosphere rendering your photos clearer, sharper and more contrasty. For those who enjoy outdoor photography, especially distant vistas, a UV filter can produce a more distinct image by removing much of the blue tint normally associated with atmospheric haze. The filter ring is made from brass yielding a stronger product. Brass filter rings are also less prone to jamming. In addition, the seal between the glass and filter ring is exceptionally strong giving the filter added strength and durability. The excellent Schott Glass used in the manufacturing of this filter is legendary and synonymous with the highest standards of filter production. It comes with a solid 10-year warranty.
B+W Digital Pro Multi-Coated (MRC) Ultraviolet (UVa) 010 Glass Filte B+W Digital Pro Multi-Coated (MRC) Ultraviolet (UVa) 010 Glass Filter - The UV-Haze filter is helpful when photographing mountain and marine scenes, where increased haze threatens to make your photographs indistinct in color and clarity. Multi-coated to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. • The filter ring is brass with a brushed chrome finish which will help with matching many point and shoot digital cameras as well as many video camcorders. Check availability & current prices at 
B+W XS-Pro Pro Clear 007M Digital Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter B+W XS-Pro Pro Clear 007M Digital Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter. The B+W XS-Pro Pro Clear 007M Digital (MRC) Glass Filter has been developed to minimize the risk of vignetting with today's digital wide angle and zoom lenses. The Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) provides additional protection from unwanted flare, ghosting and other reflections which play havoc with sensor readings. The brass ring design meets the traditional B+W standard for top shelf filter design. The filter, slim in construction and black in color, still maintains front threads for supplemental attachments such as caps, lens hoods or other filters.
B+W XS-Pro Digital Ultraviolet (UV) Multi-Resistant (MRC) Coated 010M Glass Filter B+W XS-Pro Digital Ultraviolet (UV) Multi-Resistant (MRC) Coated 010M Glass Filter. B&W XS-Pro Digital Ultraviolet (UV) Multi-Coated 010M Glass Filters are wise initial investments. They help protect your valuable investment from dust, moisture and scratches, which can lead to costly repairs. If desired they can be left on the lens at all times for protection. XS Pro-Digital filters can help digital photography by minimizing reflections which can spoil sensor readings. The "pearl" effect of these filters helps to eliminate dirt, scratches as well as water. The Multi Resistant Coating (MRC) provides additional protection from unwanted flare, ghosting and other reflections which play havoc with sensor readings. The brass ring design meets the traditional B+W standard for top shelf filter design. The filter, slim in construction and black in color, still maintains front threads for supplemental attachments such as caps, lens hoods or other filters. It has been designed for use with today's ultra wide angle lenses. Note! This filter is suitable for zoom lenses starting at 17mm wide.
B+W 486 Digital UV/IR Blocking Glass Filter B+W 486 Digital UV/IR Blocking Glass Filter. This B+W Interference Filter has a completely colorless glass carrier coated with a number of extremely thin, partially reflecting layers with precisely computed thicknesses, similar to MC coating. The B+W Filter 486 does not block by means of absorption, but by interference of the unwanted UV- and IR radiation that is repeatedly reflected between these layers, affecting the wavelengths on both sides of the visible spectrum with a steep cut-off. It is used mainly on digital- and video cameras with CCD sensors without an integrated IR protection filter, because the IR sensitivity of the CCD sensor would otherwise cause color changes and unsharpness. That unsharpness results from the chromatic aberration of the lenses that are only corrected for visible light. In the visible range, the transmission curve is very high and straight. This filter is completely clear and it requires no increase in exposure.
  Polarizing Filters These filters are used to reduce or eliminate reflections. They are ideal for photographing through glass or water as the glare from water tends to be white. Polarizing filters can also reduce the effects of haze and darken the blue sky image in black and white and color photography. There are various polarizing filters available to increase color saturation in a photo without altering the hues of image colors, but there are only two principal styles. One style fits over your camera lens, while the other is made to be used over the source of light. They don't affect color, that's why polarizing filters and screens are used in both black and white and color photography. There are two pieces to a polarizer. The front part rotates so you can change the angle of polarization. If you look at the blue sky through a polarizer and rotate it, the sky appears to get darker and then lighter. These filters range in price from about $15 to $800. They come in various sizes.
B+W Circular Polarizer Filter B+W Circular Polarizer Filter. The reputation of B+W's Schott glass is world renowned. The high production standards combined with a sturdy brass filter ring make B+W filters hard to beat. These filters have a "heft" to them that is impressive. They may feel heavier but the benefit is in the construction and results. Not only is the glass exceptional but so is the seal between the ring and glass. Multicoated to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. Note! Circular polarizers are specifically designed for use with auto-focus SLR cameras (They will also work on manual systems without problems).
B+W Kaeseman Circular Polarizing Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) Glass Filter B+W Kaeseman Circular Polarizing Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) Glass Filter. Constructed from select polarizer foils and especially prepared optical glass. Kaeseman ("encased") filters are completely edge-sealed for maximum durability under extreme climatic conditions.
B+W Kaeseman Circular Polarizing Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) Glass Filter (Slim). B+W Kaeseman Circular Polarizing Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) Glass Filter (Slim). Constructed from select polarizer foils and especially prepared optical glass. Kaeseman ("encased") filters are completely edge-sealed for maximum durability under extreme climatic conditions. .
B+W Linear Polarizer Glass Filter. B+W Linear Polarizer Glass Filter. Note! Linear polarizers are used with most video and manual focus photo cameras. They are not recommended for auto-focus SLR cameras • This filter eliminates ultraviolet rays to remove haze from outdoor shots as well as polarizing the light to remove reflections, and increase color saturation, without affecting the overall color balance • High light transmission characteristics • Produces good shadow detail
B+W Warm Circular Polarizer 81A Glass Filter B+W Warm Circular Polarizer 81A Glass Filter. Light rays which are reflected become polarized. Polarizing filters are used to select which light rays enter your camera lens. They can remove unwanted reflections from non-metallic surfaces such as water or glass and also saturate colors providing better contrast. The effect can be seen through the viewfinder and changed by rotating the filter. The filter factor varies according to how the filter is rotated and its orientation to the sun. Filter factor is between 2.3 and 2.8 (approx. +1.3 stops). This unique filter combines the advantages of a polarizer with the warming effect of an 81A filter. Circular polarizers are specifically designed for use with auto-focus SLR cameras (They will also work on manual systems without problems).
  Neutral Density Filters These filters are designed to reduce the amount of light coming through your camera lens without changing the color. Neutral density filters can reduce the assorted colors of light in the spectrum. White and colored light is transmitted through these filters and only the intensity of the light is affected. These filters are used with black and white and color film. If you have set your camera to its fastest shutter speed along with the smallest f/stop, but still can't take the photo without overexposing the film, you can use one of these filters to reduce the exposure further. The filters help to eliminate bright, washed out sections of a photo. Neutral density filters usually range in price from about $10 to $350. They are available in various sizes.
B+W Neutral Density Filter 101 DIGITAL-PRO (ND 2) B+W Neutral Density Filter 101 DIGITAL-PRO (ND 2) The lightest B+W Neutral Density Filter attenuates the light by one f-stop (log density 0.3), which can be beneficial, for instance, for the correct exposure of high-speed films when the brightness of the subject is still too high for the fastest shutter speed and the smallest aperture. It is recommended especially as a complement to B+W Neutral Density Filter 102 for fine adjustments. The filter factor is 2x.
B+W Neutral Density Filter 102 DIGITAL-PRO SLIM MRC (ND 4) B+W Neutral Density Filter 102 DIGITAL-PRO SLIM MRC (ND 4) This B+W Neutral Density Filter reduces the light by two f-stops (log density 0.6), and it is the most popular ND filter in photographic work. It offers many benefits, for instance f/4 instead of f/8 for selective sharpness instead of a great depth of field, or 1/15 s instead of 1/60 s for a flowing instead of a “frozen” waterfall. It has excellent color neutrality, costs less than the denser filters, and is recommended as part of a basic outfit. The filter factor is 4x.
B+W Neutral Density Filter 103 DIGITAL-PRO SLIM (ND 8) B+W Neutral Density Filter 103 DIGITAL-PRO SLIM (ND 8) Somewhat more difficult to manufacture and thus a little costlier, this B+W Neutral Density Filter reduces the light intensity by three f-stops (log density 0.9). It still features very good color neutrality. This ND filter is especially appropriate for use on video cameras when the lens cannot be stopped down sufficiently in great brightness or when a deliberately low depth of field is desired. The filter factor is 8x.
B+W Neutral Density Filter 106 (ND 64) B+W Neutral Density Filter 106 (ND 64) This B+W Neutral Density Filter reduces the light by six f-stops. With this filter and without changing the f-stop, a shutter speed of 1/60 s is changed to a full second, thus requiring the use of a tripod. Flowing water is rendered as flowing in the photo, and people moving in streets are dissolved in unsharpness or become invisible. Because of its higher transmission in the red beyond 660 nm, this filter brings a slightly warm tone to color photographs. If this effect is undesirable, a B+W UV-/IR-Blocking Filter 486 in front of the neutral density filter (not behind it!)
B+W Neutral Density Filter 110 (ND 3.0) B+W Neutral Density Filter 110 (ND 3.0) With a light intensity reduction of ten f-stops, this B+W Neutral Density Filter has a slightly stronger warm tone than the ND 106. Its principal field of application is the observation and documentation of industrial processes with extreme brightness, such as steel furnaces, incinerators, glowing filaments in halogen- and other bulbs. The filter factor is 1000x..
B+W Neutral Density Filter 113 (ND 4.0) B+W Neutral Density Filter 113 (ND 4.0) With its light reducing capability of 13 f-stops, this B+W Neutral Density Filter is used in astronomy for photographs of the sun and for recording the relative movements of heavenly bodies as light traces in extremely long exposure times. For photographs of the sun, this filter must be positioned in front of the lens and under no circumstances should it be located near the primary focus in front of, or behind the eyepiece because of the intense heat at those locations. It must not be used for observation of the sun (danger of blindness!) due to its greater transmission in the infrared range. The filter factor is 10000x.
B+W Neutral Density Filter 120 (ND 6.0) With its light reduction capability of 20 f-stops, this B+W ND Filter is used for the same astro-photographic applications as ND filter 113 when an even greater light attenuation is required. In spite of its much higher density, this filter too, must not be used for visual observation because of its transmission 
  Graduated Color Neutral Density Filters - Often, you want to balance light intensity between two areas within a scene This is important outdoors to allow more sky detail while properly exposing the foreground. Exposing for the foreground will produce a washed-out, over-exposed sky, exposing for the sky will leave the foreground dark and underexposed. Graduated Color Neutral Density filters are part clear, part neutral density with a smoothly graded transition between. An ND.6-to-Clear is often best for balancing sky to foreground. The neutral gray appearance drops exposure.
B+W Graduated Filter Gray 501 B+W Graduated Filter Gray 501 The neutral gray half of this filter transmits 50% of the incoming light, so that it darkens the respective portion of the subject by one f-stop without altering its colors. For example, when the sky is too bright in relation to the landscape, this is an ideal amount for good detail rendition in the clouds and for preventing the sky from being “washed out” by over-exposure.
B+W Graduated Filter Dark Gray 502. B+W Graduated Filter Dark Gray 502. Because it attenuates the light twice as much as the previous filter, i.e. by two aperture stops (it transmits 25% of the incoming light), this graduated filter al -ready produces quite dramatic effects. Because of the increased difference in brightness, it is even more important for the horizon line not to be positioned too far from the center of the image.
B+W Graduated Filter Red 590 B+W Graduated Filter Red 590 This graduated filter is often referred to as the “sun -set filter”, because it can simulate a missing red sky in the evening or in the morning or to enhance one that is too pale when the line of sight is towards the sun. By the sea or by a lake, the horizon line should be positioned high enough for the red portion of the filter also to cover the reflection in the water.
B+W Graduated Filter Orange 524 B+W Graduated Filter Orange 524 The somewhat more delicate coloring of this graduated filter is recommended when the correction of the sunset mood is not to be too pronounced, or when a certain amount of red coloring is already present, so that only a small enhancement would be sufficient. With heavy gray thunderstorm clouds it can produce a nearly awesome storm mood.
B+W Graduated Filter Violet 543 B+W Graduated Filter Violet 543 With grazing light and a sparse exposure, this graduated filter with its somewhat unnatural color can produce a ghostly, macabre moonlight effect. So it is more suitable for abstractions rather than enhancements of natural moods. An interesting effect can be achieved by using it in combination with the graduated green filter 56¡ for the lower half of the image.
B+W Graduated Filter Tabac 550 B+W Graduated Filter Tabac 550 Those who have experienced a sandstorm in the desert will never forget that mood. With this graduated filter, one can approximate that mood: slightly threatening, yet still pleasantly “warm”. The tobacco color is discreet, not overly colorful, so that it never appears gross nor overlay the existing colors as much as the other more intense graduated colors.
B+W Graduated Filter Green 561 B+W Graduated Filter Green 561 Because of its vegetation color, this graduated filter is especially suitable for the lower half of an image when used in combinations with other graduated filters that are being used to darken or to alter the color of the sky. With such filter combinations, the TTL exposure metering should be performed C
B+W Graduated Filter Green 561  This is an excellent solution when the sky isn’t blue enough. It can be used effectively in combination with another graduated filter for the lower half of the image, so that in such a combination the sky will not be rendered too brightly or too pale. Example: sand dunes by the sea; using a graduated B+W Tabac Filter for the lower half and a graduated Blue Filter for the upper half of the image.
  Color Conversion Filters These filters are used to balance the color temperatures when you are using certain films under different light sources. An example of this would be using daylight film under tungsten lighting or vice versa. Color conversion filters are designed to convert the temperature of the film to light or of the light to film. This will allow all the colors to fall in proper perspective and look natural. These filters are generally available in two series:
Warming Filters
B+W 81A Warming Color Conversion Filter B+W 81A Warming Color Conversion Filter. Increase the color temperature slightly; this can also be used when shooting tungsten type B film (3200 K) with 3400 K photoflood lights. Pale orange color. The opposite of 82A.. This filter balances color temperature from artificial light sources to the color tungsten film standard of 3200 degrees and balances the difference up to 3400 degrees. Due to this characteristic, a noticeable warmer color reproduction is produced. This fine balancing is important for special work such as art reproductions where true color reproduction is required. Filter factor is approximately 1.2.
B+W 81B Warming Color Conversion filter B+W 81B Warming Color Conversion filter. It's Autumn. The clouds are low hanging and the sky is "patchy blue". You've gone for a ride upstate to the mountains and the light in open shade is bluish. A photo taken of your girlfriend with daylight balanced film leaning against the side of a barn will yield bluish tones that she might not find particularly flattering.

An 81B filter will replace even more yellow than an 81A and bring her skin tones back to a more appealing level. An 81B can also be used with electronic flash to reduce the amount of "blue" generated by the flash. The 81 series (81A, B, C, D and EF) allows you to choose how much warmth you wish to replace in the image.

B+W 81C Warming Color Conversion Filter (KR3) B+W 81C Warming Color Conversion Filter (KR3) , slightly stronger than 81B, opposite of 82C.This filter is strongly recommended for daylight photographs, especially in spring and summer with cloudless skies and clear air. It helps eliminate the strong blue tone and haziness that is produced by this level of ultraviolet light. Furthermore, it will reduce the unwanted blue tone in shadow areas with an overcast sky. Filter factor is approximately 1.2.
B+W 81D Color Conversion Filter B+W 81D Color Conversion Filter This filter controls the bluish coloration that affects daylight film. An 81D is used as a warming filter to eliminate the bluishness of open shade on very clear days. The 81D is stronger than an 81C and is also used for general landscape photography on cloudy days as well as to add more of a "suntanned look" in portrait photography.

An 81D filter will more than replace the yellow missing from the image and place all skin tones on a "warmish" level. The 81 series (81A, B, C, D and EF) allows you to choose how much warmth you wish to replace in the image.

  Cooling Filters
B+W 80A (KB15) Color Conversion Glass Filter B+W 80A (KB15) Color Conversion Glass Filter. The slightly denser KB ¡5 filter is recommended for daylight color reversal film with artificial light from the popular 60 to ¡00 watt halogen bulbs commonly used in lights aimed at the ceiling. With weaker incandescent bulbs, there will again be that pleasant warm tone for moody interior photographs. Its filter factor is approximately 2.2.
B+W 80B B+W Color Conversion Filter KB 12 SLIM MRC B+W 80B B+W Color Conversion Filter KB 12 SLIM MRC The deep blue filter KB ¡2 blocks so much red, orange and yellow that it increases the color temperature of very bright halogen and special photoflood lamps (of around 3400 K) to that of daylight. With that kind of illumination, and with daylight color reversal film, the subjects will be reproduced in their original colors. With weaker halogen bulbs or stronger incandescent bulbs in conjunction with this filter and with daylight reversal film, a residue of “warmth” will be retained for an optimal mood in interior photographs. Its filter factor is approximately 2.
B+W 80D (KB 6) Cooling Color Conversion Glass Filter B+W 80D (KB 6) Cooling Color Conversion Glass Filter. This nearly medium blue conversion filter neutralizes the strong red tendency of light at sunrise or sunset out in the open when the original colors of the subject are wanted instead of a warm morning- or evening mood. In addition, the KB 6 filter is ideal for “under-corrected” filtering of artificial light photographs on color negative films. When filtration is performed only later during printing, there is a visible color shift, and full correction leads to a higher loss of light. Its filter factor is approximately 1.5.
B+W 82A - Color Conversion Glass Filter (KB 1.5)i B+W 82A - Color Conversion Glass Filter (KB 1.5)is a light balancing filter used to increase the color temperature slightly for a cooler tone. This blue filter absorbs the excessive yellow-red light from daylight in the morning.

There is much flattering light to be found in the early morning and afternoon hours. With sunlight low on the horizon, the red-orange end of the spectrum becomes enhanced. With daylight balanced film, images shot in this light may prove to be a bit on the warm side. The photographer may desire this effect or choose to "cool" things down.

An 82A has a greater "cooling" effect than an 82 but less than an 82B. The 82 series of blue filters allows the photographer to keep skin tones somewhat normal by increasing the color temperature to a more daylight balanced level. In addition, an 82A provides a cooler effect with tungsten film under 3200K lamps. • 82A Increases temperature from 3,000 to 3,200 Kelvin (1/3 stop).

B+W 82B Cooling Filter B+W 82B Cooling Filter These are light balancing filters used to increase the color temperature slightly for a cooler (bluer) tone. Corrects the tendency toward reddish tones. These series filters are also used to prevent the reddish tones in early morning or late evening light for natural skin tones. - 2900 K to 3200 K - • 82B Increases temperature from 2,900 to 3,060 Kelvin (2/3 stop).
B+W 82C Conversion Filter (KB 3) B+W 82C Conversion Filter (KB 3) - With about twice the correcting effect of the previous filter, this conversion filter removes the orange-red color cast that appears on photographs made on tungsten reversal film with artificial light using 100 to 2oo W light bulbs, or from aged photoflood lamps. Therefore this filter is ideal for neutral color reproduction with approximate illumination. • 82C Increases temperature from 2800-3200 Kelvin (2/3 stop) 
B+W Conversion Filter KB 20 SLIM MRC B+W Conversion Filter KB 20 SLIM MRC This is the correct filter when the illumination is provided by 40 to ¡50 Watt household incandescent bulbs, and the transparencies are to show the subject in its original colors (e.g., technical interior, architectural photographs, or reproductions). It should not, however, be used for moody interior pictures because unlike the KB ¡5 and KB ¡2 filters, the KB 20 filter corrects the light to a neutral balance, eliminating the warmth that we might intuitively expect from bulbs. Its filter factor is approximately 2.7.  
  Special Effects Filters There are many types of filters available that are designed to give your photographs special effects. These include filters for special color effects, star effects, spectral effects, soft effects, mist effects, multi image and multi exposure effects, graduated color, dual color and tricolor effects along with spot filters, center filters and other special effects filters. These filters are mainly made out of glass and enable you to experiment with your photos or give them specific effects. The filters are available in various colors, sizes, styles and densities. If you buy extra filters you definitely require a good camera bag with padding to hold and protect them. They generally range in price from about $20 to several hundred and many of these filters are sold individually or in sets.
B+W 4x Cross Screen 684 Star Effect Glass Filter B+W 4x Cross Screen 684 Star Effect Glass Filter The star patterns created around light sources by star screens are not spread out as colorfully as those created by Spectra attachments. Instead, their colors are less pronounced. The rays begin right at the light sources, they are very long and they are most effective when they are not vertical and horizontal, but at an angle of approximately 45° to the vertical axis.
B+W 6x Cross Screen 686 Star Effect Glass Filter B+W 6x Cross Screen 686 Star Effect Glass Filter The star pattern produced by this screen is similar to that of the previous one, except that it generates 6 beams from light sources and reflections at an angle of 60° to one another. Here too the light rays ema -nate right at the light sources,
B+W 8x Cross Screen 688 Star Effect Glass Filter B+W 8x Cross Screen 688 Star Effect Glass Filter Like two 4-beam star screens superimposed at a rotational angle of 45°, this star screen generates eight star beams.
  Soft Focus Filters - Diffusion filters are used to create soften images. A diffusion filter diffuses strong light without affecting the sharpness and contrast of the image. Thus, it is different from the effect of out of focus. Diffusion filters are mainly used in portrait work. In general, small skin defects can be eliminated almost completely, and facial contrast and wrinkles are soften. To create a better result, the aperture should be opened up so that the subject can stand out well against the background
  Soft does not mean unsharp
In spite of the fact that the effect of soft focus attachment is related to unsharpness, it should not be equated with it. That is because good soft focus attach -ments only “coat” a so-called core image that remains very sharp with a subtle veil of unsharpness, so that soft-focus photos can be rich in details. It is exactly this delicate combination of approximately 70% to 90% sharp with only ¡0% to 30% of an unsharp blend that creates its pleasant charm. In some types of soft effect filters, there is a noticeable reduction of contrast that results partly from refraction and partly from light scattering by the struc -ture of the surface. This can make a contribution to the soft focus effect that is at least equal to that of the finely coated veil of unsharpness.

It’s better to over-expose
In descriptions of the effects of soft focus attachments, reference is frequently made to flare, light fringes or halos. That implies that the subject is bathed in light. The friendly effect of such soft focus pho -tographs also has something to do with our fondness for just the right amount of pleasing light. That amount of light can only appear authentic if the picture’s light-colored portions are really bright. That in turn means that the original exposure should not be too dark, but preferably a bit over (by approximately

B+W Soft Focus Attachment Soft Pro Glass Diffusion Filter. B+W Soft Focus Attachment Soft Pro Glass Diffusion Filter. The effect of this B+W soft focus attachment is cre -ated by fine lenticular protrusions that have been applied to a high-grade plano-parallel plate of glass in a random pattern. The light passing through between these protrusions creates a sharp core image for ac -curate focusing and great detail. This is an important feature for photographers using AF reflex cameras. The light diverted from its regular direction by the mini-lenses, coats the image with a diffuse halo of light for a delightful softness. This soft focus attach -ment is as ideal for feminine portraits, especially with highlights in blond hair. You can also use this attach -ment to create dreamy landscapes.
B+W Soft Image Glass Filter B+W Soft Image Glass Filter. Subject contours “flow” markedly softer with the Soft Image attachment on the lens than they do with the B+W Soft Pro. Prominent halos form around light sources and reflections, and bright parts of the subject acquire a noticeable veil of light. This effect is maintained even when the lens is stopped down. It is recommended for portraits and for backlit situations (however, it may be too soft for some landscapes).
B+W SF Attachments Original Zeiss Softar 1 and 2 B+W SF Attachments Original Zeiss Softar 1 and 2 This soft focus attachment has a large number of mini-lenses of varying sizes distributed on its surface in a random pattern, which deliberately defocuses the light that is passing through. This creates a soft, unsharp image around a sharp core image (which is advantageous for reliable manual or automatic focus -ing). The soft focus effect is largely independent of the chosen aperture setting, so that the depth of field can be controlled for the most part with only very modest concern for the degree of the soft focus effect. For a delicate soft focus effect, there is the Softar 1, and for a more pronounced soft.
B+W Fog Attachments Fog 1 and Fog 2 B+W Fog Attachments Fog 1 and Fog 2 The effect of the Fog ¡ and Fog 2 attachments is quite different from that of the soft focus attachments as descibed above. The subject appears to be behind a delicate, bright veil of fog, which, unlike the effect created in corresponding pictures by soft focus at -tachments, also noticeably lightens large dark por -tions of the picture. All colors are strongly whitened and desaturated. By slightly over-exposing by ap -proximately half an aperture stop, the romanticizing soft effect can often be enhanced even further. The two strengths that are available serve for tailoring the effect to the subject.
B+W Softspot B+W Softspot The Softspot attachment consists of a clear circular opening in the center, surrounded by a structured surface that “coats” the outer portions of the image with a whitening unsharp softness in a vignette-like fashion: the center of the image is clearly emphasized and surrounded by a wide frame. At large apertures (small f-stop number), the transition from sharpness to whitened unsharpness is very gradual, whereas it is almost abrupt when the lens is stopped down. It is advisable to use the preview lever on cameras (that are equipped with one) to determine the optimal.
  B+W Color Enhancing Filters
B+W 491 Enhancing Filter B+W 491 Enhancing Filter The B&W Enhancing Filter is an absolute necessity for those who enjoy the Autumn foliage or any venue where you wish the earth tones to be exaggerated. This filter gives the red end of the spectrum a "boost" creating colors that are more vivid, saturated and surreal. It is a combination of rare earth elements (didymium) in glass. It removes a portion of the spectrum in the orange region, increasing the color saturation of reddish objects by eliminating the muddy tones and maximizing the red hues with minimal effect on other colors. The filter ring is made from brass yielding a stronger product. Brass filter rings are also less prone to jamming. In addition, the seal between the glass and filter ring is exceptionally strong giving the filter added strength and durability. The excellent Schott Glass used in the manufacturing of this filter is legendary and synonymous with the highest standards of filter production. It comes with a solid 10-year warranty. • Its most frequent use is for obtaining strongly saturated photographs of Fall foliage • Use with polarizer for more dramatic effects.
B+W 491 Enhancing Filter (Slim) B+W 491 Enhancing Filter (Slim) This filter uses a slim line mount. Slim filters are only 3mm thick and are specifically designed for use with lenses as wide as 17mm in the 35mm format. In order to help eliminate vignetting (darkening of the corners), they do not have a front thread. It comes supplied with a slip on lens cap.
  Fluorescent Filters Fluorescent filters are used to correct the greenish tone that can show up when you are shooting daylight film under fluorescent lighting. There are various types of fluorescent filters. They can balance daylight film under warm white or white type fluorescent lights and correct the color balance when using tungsten film under fluorescent lighting. Fluorescent filters are basically general purpose filters that are designed for moderate correction. They may not always provide perfect color rendition by themselves. Because fluorescent lights shine at various temperatures they often need more filtration for proper results.
B+W #499 Fluorescent Glass Filter for Daylight Film B+W #499 Fluorescent Glass Filter for Daylight Film This B+W Special Filter eliminates the green cast that occurs when daylight-type color film is in fluorescent lighting. Examples are interior photographs made in offices, reception areas, factory halls, subway stations and swimming pool halls, as well as night-time photographs of office buildings whose windows would appear green because their interiors are usually illuminated with fluorescent tubes. The abbreviation F-Day stands for “Fluorescent Light - Daylight”, which reflects the fact that these filters are designed for the most commonly used type of fluorescent tube, which emit light of a color that, as mentioned above, resembles daylight. Because fluorescent tubes are not “thermal radiators”, they do not produce a continuous spectrum like those of the sun and incandescent bulbs. Instead, they emit a sharply defined line spectrum that has high intensity spikes in the green region. Our eyes barely perceive this special green, so the fluorescent light appears to us as nearly neutral in color. However, most color films are especially sensitive to those wavelengths and they react with a strong pronounced cast. Photographers using color temperature meters for three color metering (simple meters that measure only two colors are not suitable for this purpose) can also undertake the correct filtering with of a combination of LB- and CC filters (see pages ¡7 - 23). With this method, they can also correct the light emitted by other types of fluorescent tubes, such as Warm Tone, Standard Light, White Light, etc. But for hobby photographers who do not wish to make a large investment in such an instrument and who do not care to carry along a selection of LB- and CC filters, the B+W F-Day Filter is far less expensive and much.
B+W KR12 Color Conversion Glass Filter B+W KR12 Color Conversion Glass Filter This B&W KR12 Reddish-Brown Color Conversion Glass filter allows the use of a tungsten-balanced film in daylight without a strong blue cast. It effectively absorbs the excess of daylight blue that is otherwise superimposed on all the colors. But, the KR12 filter is not only useful as a "savior in cases of need", or for making good use of an otherwise useless remnant of film, because it can also be used effectively for overcoming extreme contrasts that are greater than a daylight reversal film can handle. A reversal film balanced for tungsten light has a flatter gradation curve, adding a possible high contrast control. Note! Whereas the 85 series is used for tungsten film under daylight conditions, use the 80 series of filters when using daylight film under tungsten lighting 85 Series Color Conversion Chart • An 85 decreases the color temperature from 5500-3400° Kelvin • An 85A decreases the color temperature from 5500-3100° Kelvin • An 85B decreases the color temperature from 5500-3200° Kelvin • An 85C decreases the color temperature from 5500-3800° Kelvin.
  Black & White Photography Filters Filters are often used in black and white photography as black and white are actually produced as tones of gray. Filters are used to make the gray tones look like the original scene. The sky and clouds often blend together in black and white photos as white, so filters are used to separate the two. A red filter can darken blue objects more than white objects. So if you use this filter the sky will look black in the photo and the clouds will still be white.

 

More differentiated greens
Why does the use of a yellow-green filter lead to a much better differentiation of green tones in nature- and landscape photography? Here is the answer: Green can be a spectrally relatively pure green, but it can also be a blue-green & yellow-green mixture. Whereas pure green is readily transmitted by a yellow-green filter, an equally bright mixed-color green will have its blue-green component reduced, so that it will appear darker in a black-and-white print, darker than the gray tone generated by pure green.

Brightness- vs. color contrast
Unlike color photographs, black-and-white photographs only have brightness contrast, no color contrast. That is why in the photography of objects, for example, things that have different colors but the same brightness will have similar gray values. For instance, when there is a blue toy in the foreground and red dress with the same brightness in the background, they will be reproduced with the same gray values. This is referred to as insuffi -cient tonal separation.

Colored filters are helpful in such situations. First the photographer must de -cide which object is to be rendered lighter and which one is to be rendered darker. Then he can select a filter color that ¡) is similar to the color of the object that is to be shown lighter and that 2) is as com -plementary as possible to the object that is to be rendered darker. If the two colors are already nearly complementary, like blue and orange, he selects a filter color that is similar to that of the object that is to be rendered lighter. If the two main colors are not complementary, like blue and red, a compromise can be used: A blue filter lightens the blue color, but it also darkens the red color a little. But a green filter could also be used. While it would only lighten the related blue color a little, it would darken the red color more strongly than the blue filter would. The photographer would have achieved his objective in either case: a good tonal sep -aration with the lighter gray of the toy and a darker gray for the dress.

B+W 021 Light Yellow Glass Filter (2E) B+W 021 Light Yellow Glass Filter (2E) This filter suppresses violet and attenuates blue. On the other hand, green, yellow, orange and red are reproduced in lighter shades. It is ideal for landscape photographs, since white clouds will contrast more against the darker blue sky, and the shades of green on plants are more differentiated. Freckles and skin blemishes in portraits can be attenuated, tans can be rendered lighter. Its filter factor is approximately 1.5.
B+W 021 Light Yellow Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) Glass Filter B+W 021 Light Yellow Multi-Resistant Coating (MRC) Glass Filter.
B+W 022 Medium Yellow (8) Filter B+W 022 Medium Yellow (8) Filter. With stronger blue suppression, which extends into the blue-green, the effects described above are slightly stronger in the same types of applications. Clouds in the sky look very natural, but not yet dramatic. Distant views with light haze become clearer. An ideal filter, especially for landscape- and plant photographs. Its filter factor is approximately 2.
B+W 022 Medium Yellow (8) Multi-Coated (MC) Filte B+W 022 Medium Yellow (8) Multi-Coated (MC) Filter.
B+W 023 Dark Yellow (9) Glass Filter B+W 023 Dark Yellow (9) Glass Filter (For Clouds) The even greater blue suppression and the attenuation into the blue-green range leads to a further increase in the effects described above. Interesting for snow scenes under a blue sky, because the darkened blue shadows in the snow make the shapes of the landscape look more dimensional. Freckles and skin blemishes are diminished strongly, but lips are rendered more pale (to compensate for you may use a dark lipstick!). Its filter factor is approximately 3.
B+W 023 Dark Yellow (9) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter B+W 023 Dark Yellow (9) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter.
B+W Bay 3 040 Yellow-Orange (16) Glass Filter B+W Bay 3 040 Yellow-Orange (16) Glass Filter.
B+W 040 Yellow-Orange (16) Glass Filter B+W 040 Yellow-Orange (16) Glass Filter. The effect of this filter is quite powerful. It darkens violet and blue very strongly, green strongly, it even darkens yellow-green a bit. Landscape- and architectural photographs have an increased, virtually “graphic” contrast, clouds in the sky already look dramatic. Because skin tones are strongly lightened in relation to the green tones of plants, this is a favored filter for nude photography outdoors, because it raises the contrast between the lighter bodies and darker landscapes. Its filter factor is approximately 4.
B+W 040 Yellow-Orange (16) Multi-Coated (MC) Glass Filter B+W 040 Yellow-Orange (16) Multi-Coated (MC) Glass Filter.
B+W 041 Red-Orange (22) Glass Filter (For Clouds). B+W 041 Red-Orange (22) Glass Filter (For Clouds).
B+W 041 Red-Orange (22) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter B+W 041 Red-Orange (22) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter. The intensified effect of this filter borders on the abstract. It darkens a blue sky with clouds to resemble the mood of an impending thunderstorm. Architectural photographs gain clarity and drama. This filter is also interesting for many black-and-white close-up photographs of flowers, when dark yellow, orange or red blossoms have almost the same brightness as the surrounding greenery: This filter is used to render the flowers in lighter shades of gray. Depending on the subject, its filter factor is 4 to 5.
  Black & White Film Contrast Filters
B+W 60 Yellow-Green (11) Multi-Coated (MC) Glass Filter B+W 60 Yellow-Green (11) Multi-Coated (MC) Glass Filter This B&W 060 Yellow-Green Glass Filter Multi-Coated (MC) has an effect similar to that of the medium yellow filter, but it also darkens red colors. Clouds in the sky gain more contrast. A red roof and red flowers are rendered darker in relation to plant greens (as they would not with a purely yellow filter). The yellow-green filter accentuates the delicate springtime green in nature. It makes portraits more dramatic. Multicoated toMinimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. • Especially suited to landscape photography because it enhances the light green color of the leaves • Due to its favorable effect on red tones, it is also suitable for portraits against the sky • Universal asset for all scenics • Darkens sky in contrast to clouds.
B+W 061 Dark Green Glass Filter B+W 061 Dark Green Glass Filter This B&W 061 Dark Green Glass Filter differs from the Yellow-Green filter primarily because of its increased red attenuation. A red roof or red flowers will become even darker, as will red lips and a dark tan. Unfortunately, so will skin blemishes. This filter is ideal for nature photography. In object photography, it is good for darker reds and lighter greens. • Especially useful for clear contrast between blue sky with clouds and foreground • Recommended as a basic filter for use with Kodak Aero Ektachrome Infrared film.
B+W Bay 1 090 Light Red Glass Filter B+W Bay 1 090 Light Red Glass Filter.
B+W 090 Light Red (25) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter B+W 090 Light Red (25) Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter This B&W Light Red Multi-Resistant Coated (MRC) Glass Filter is the classic filter for strong contrast in black and white and architectural photography. The white sides of buildings shine brightly; skies are darkened dramatically and clouds become more impressive. It is also excellent for spectacular landscape photographs that will be characterized by greatly improved vistas. Multicoated to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. • Clouds are dramatically improved almost to the mood of a thunderstorm; darkens blue sky creating dramatic contrast between sky and clouds • It is more effective in cutting through haze, and moonlight effects are easily accomplished; creates greater contrast between foliage and flowers • It is also suited for infrared photography 1.
B+W 091 Dark Red (029) Glass Filter B+W 091 Dark Red (029) Glass Filter.
B+W 091 Dark Red (029) Multi-Coated (MC) Glass Filter B+W 091 Dark Red (029) Multi-Coated (MC) Glass Filter. Compared to the B&W Light Red filter (090), this B&W 091 Dark Red Multi-Coated (MC) Glass filter darkens the reds near the yellow tones in the spectrum, as its transparency only begins in the orange-red region. It produces dramatic effects and extreme tonal separation for graphic effects. Multicoated to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. • Stronger than an 090 Light Red (25) • Clouds are dramatically improved almost to the mood of a thunderstorm; Darkens blue sky creating dramatic contrast between sky and clouds • Use with Polarizer for dramatic black and white effects • It is more effective in cutting through haze, and moonlight effects are easily accomplished; Creates greater contrast between foliage and flowers • Used in scientific photography • Excellent copying filter for blueprints.
  Infrared Filters Infrared filters are made to block mid infrared wavelengths while allowing visible light to pass through. They are sometimes referred to as heat absorbing filters and are ideal at cutting through haze. These types of filters are commonly used to prevent unnecessary heating in items which have bright incandescent light bulbs. Examples of such devices are slide projectors and overhead projectors. You can also get near infrared filters. These types of filters commonly are used in video cameras to compensate for the high sensitivity of the camera's sensors to near-infrared light. Infrared filters can range in price from about $20 to $450. They come in various sizes, styles and brands.
B+W Infrared Filter 092 (≈ 89 B) [RG 695] B+W Infrared Filter 092 (≈ 89 B) [RG 695] The nearly opaque B+W Infrared Filter 092, which looks dark purplish red when held in front of a light source, blocks visible light up to 650 nm, and passes only 50% of the radiation just below 700 nm (thus the dark red color). From 730 nm to 2000 nm, transmission is greater than 90%. This makes photographs of pure red and infrared images possible with the best utilization of the relatively low sensitivity of infrared films. As the sensitization of infrared black-and-white films barely extends beyond 1000 nm, the red portion that is transmitted still makes a relevant contribution to the exposure. That is why this filter is the preferred filter for pictorial photography on IR black-and-white film. Its filter factor is 20 to 40.
B+W Infrared Filter 093 (≈ 87 C) [RG 830] B+W Infrared Filter 093 (≈ 87 C) [RG 830] This B+W Infrared Filter blocks the entire visible spectrum, so to our eyes it looks completely opaque. Unlike the infrared filter described above, it makes pure infrared photographs possible without the visible red component. Its transmission only begins to exceed ¡% at 800 nm, rising to 88% at 900 nm, and remains that high far beyond the upper limit of sensitization covered by infrared films. This filter is used less frequently in pictorial photography because of the dramatic loss of effective ISO. But in the scientific field, materials research and forensics, the limitation to a strictly infrared range is often important. The filter factor is very dependent on the illumination and on the characteristics of the film.
B+W Infrared Filter 099 (≈ 16) [OG 550] B+W Infrared Filter 099 (≈ 16) [OG 550] The orange-colored B+W Infrared Filter 099 is the ideal filter for photography with infrared color film, which is also referred to as “False Color Film” because of its charming abstract color reproduction. It blocks large portions of short-wave radiation, up to 520 nm (blue, blue-green) and reaches its full transmission near 600 nm, which it retains far beyond the sensitization range of these films. This avoids the blue cast that is caused by the heightened sensitivity in this spectral range, and it leads to a better differentiation of colors. The charm of these infrared color photographs is partly due to the orange to red rendition of green vegetation, which is due in turn to the high infrared reflectivity of the chlorophyll in plants. The filter factor is highly dependent on the film.
B+W 489 Infrared Glass Filter B+W 489 Infrared Glass Filter This IR-blocking filter must not be confused with heat-resisting protection filters for projectors or spotlights. Instead, it is intended for use as protection for IR-sensitive CCD sensors or in the light path of illumination devices with low thermal characteristics. It suppresses infrared radiation ≥780 nm. Because it gradually begins to absorb infrared radiation at 600 nm, long-wave red light is slightly weakened, so that this filter has a subtle green tint. But in CCD applications, this can be readily corrected electronically. Its filter factor is approximately 1.2.

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