Roll Film

Rollfilm is a spool-wound photographic film protected from exposure to white light by a paper backing, as adverse to film which is sheltered from exposure and being wound forward in a cartridge. The term originated as opposed to sheet film. Confusingly, roll film was often initially referred to as "cartridge" film because of its similarity to a shotgun cartridge. The opaque backing paper lets roll film to be loaded in a camera in daylight. Most often it is printed with frame number markings which can be seen through a small window at the camera back. A spool of roll film is most often loaded at one side of the camera and pulled across the camera back to an identical take up spool on the opposite side of the shutter as exposures are created. When the roll is completely exposed, the take up spool is removed from the camera for processing while the now empty spool on which the film was initially wound is then moved to the opposite side, thus becoming the take up spool for the impending roll of film.

The most popular rollfilm is the 120 film format, which is used in the majority of medium-format cameras and roll film magazines on large-format cameras. Until the start of the 1950s, 120 roll film was also the most and simplist of snapshot cameras, and box cameras at the time. Roll film in consumer cameras was largely overtaken by 135 and 126 cartridges, although 120 and 220 (double length) film are still a common use in medium-format cameras.


Film Speed Rating - ISO / ASA

All film and digital copies have a speed rating. Digital or traditional, you may see a number labeled ASA or ISO (both denote the film or digital print's rated speed). This ISO / ASA rating determines just how fast the film interacts with light.

Film speed uses stops, just like shutter and aperture

For example, going from ISO50 to ISO200 buys you 2 stops more light. Slower films are less sensitive and generally require longer exposures / more light. Faster films react rapidly, and can be used in low light situations.

lower numbers = slower films = need more light = longer exposures
higher numbers = faster films = need less light = shorter exposures

*Digital cameras also have a film speed rating, typically around 50ASA. Instead of purchasing different film for a digital camera, you just change the ISO/ASA, just like "real" film.

Film Speed vs. Contrast and Grain

There's a trade-off between fast and slow films called quality. Fast films typically feature higher contrast and grain. While slower films typically deliver sharper, more detailed images.

 

35mm Rollfilm

35mm ISO 50

Fujifilm Fujichrome Velvia RVP 50 Color Slide Film ISO 50, 35mm Size, 36 Exposure, RVP50-36, U.S.A, Transparency.
 
 
 


35mm ISO 100

Agfa Agfapan APX 100 Black & White Negative Film ISO 100, 35mm Size, 36 Exposure

Fujifilm Fujichrome Velvia 100 Color Slide Film
ISO 100, 35mm, 36 Exposures

Fujifilm Fujichrome Provia 100F Color Slide Film
ISO 100, 35mm, 36 Exposures

Ilford 1780624 Delta 100 Professional Black-and-White Film, ISO 100, 35mm 36-Exposure


Kodak Professional Ektar 100 Color Negative Film (35mm Roll Film, 36 Exposures)
Daylight-Balanced Color Negative Film
ISO 100/21 in C-41 Process
Extremely Fine Grain Structure
Vivid Color Saturation, High Sharpness
T-GRAIN Emulsion, Ideal for Scanning


35mm ISO 200

Agfa Vista Plus 200 35mm Color Negative Film, 36 Exposures

FujiFilm ISO 200 35mm Color Print Film - 24 Exposures, 4 Pack-T37747
 
 


35mm ISO 400

Kodak Professional Portra 400 Color Negative Film (35mm Roll Film, 36 Exposures)
Daylight-Balanced Color Negative Film
ISO 400/27 in C-41 Process
Very Fine Grain, VISION Film Technology
High Color Saturation, Low Contrast
Accurate Color and Neutral Skin Tones
High Sharpness and Fine Edge Detail
T-GRAIN Emulsion, Ideal for Scanning
Check Availability

Kodak Professional Tri-X 400 Black and White Negative Film (35mm Roll Film, 36 Exposures)
Panchromatic B&W Negative Film
ISO 400/27 in Standard Process
Fine Grain and High Sharpness
Wide Exposure Latitude
Responds Well to Push Processing

Fujifilm Fujicolor PRO 400H Professional Color Negative Film (35mm Roll Film, 36 Exposures)
Daylight-Balanced Color Negative Film
ISO 400/27 in C-41 Process
Unobtrusive Grain, Fine Sigma Technology
Soft Contrast and Wide Exposure Latitude
Fourth Color Layer and Interlayer Effect
True Color Accuracy in Various Lighting
Smooth Color Gradations and Skin Tones

Fujifilm Fujichrome Provia 400X Professional (RXPIII), Color Slide Film, ISO 400, 120 Size, Transparency

Fujifilm 400 Speed 25 Exposure APS Film (3 Pack)


35mm ISO 800

Lomography 35mm 36 Exposure 800 ISO film- 3 pack

Fujifilm Superia Xtra 800 Speed 35mm Film (24 Exposures)


120 Rollfilm

120 ISO 50
 
 
 
 


120 ISO 100

Kodak Professional Ektar 100 Color Negative Film (120 Roll Film)
Daylight-Balanced Color Negative Film
ISO 100/21 in C-41 Process
Extremely Fine Grain Structure
Vivid Color Saturation, High Sharpness
T-GRAIN Emulsion, Ideal for Scanning

Kodak Professional T-Max 100 Black and White Negative Film (120 Roll Film)
Panchromatic B&W Negative Film
ISO 100/21 in Standard Process
Very Fine Grain, T-GRAIN Emulsion
High Sharpness and Resolving Power
Wide Exposure Latitude and Tonal Range
Can Be Processed in Reversal Chemistry
 
 
 


120 ISO 200
 
 
 
 


120 ISO 400

Kodak Professional Portra 400 Color Negative Film (120 Roll Film)
Daylight-Balanced Color Negative Film
ISO 400/27 in C-41 Process
Very Fine Grain, VISION Film Technology
High Color Saturation, Low Contrast
Accurate Color and Neutral Skin Tones
High Sharpness and Fine Edge Detail
T-GRAIN Emulsion, Ideal for Scanning

Kodak Professional Tri-X 400 Black and White Negative Film (120 Roll Film)
Panchromatic B&W Negative Film
ISO 400/27 in Standard Process
Fine Grain and High Sharpness
Wide Exposure Latitude
Responds Well to Push Processing

Kodak Professional T-Max 400 Black and White Negative Film (120 Roll Film)
Panchromatic B&W Negative Film
ISO 400/27 in Standard Process
Very Fine Grain, T-GRAIN Emulsion
High Sharpness and Edge Detail
Versatile Speed & Wide Exposure Latitude

 

 


120 ISO 800

Kodak Professional Portra 800 Color Negative Film (120 Roll Film)
Daylight-Balanced Color Negative Film
ISO 800/30 in C-41 Process
Fine Grain, High Sharpness & Edge Detail
Vivid Color Saturation, Low Contrast
Accurate Color and Neutral Skin Tones
Versatile and Wide Exposure Latitude
Suitable for Low-Light Conditions
T-GRAIN Emulsion, Ideal for Scanning

 


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35mm 120mm, 220mm, and Polaroid Photographic Film Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5