Pontiac Motor Cars Through the Years


A Pictorial Glimpse of Pontiac Motor Cars from 1907 to 2010

Pontiac was an automobile brand initially created as Oakland Motor Company in 1907, and was renamed "Pontiac Motor Co." in 1926. Pontiac was marketed by General Motors (GM) in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Pontiac had been promoted as the performance division of General Motors for a long time, and specialized in performance vehicles. On April 27, 2009, in the midst of continuous financial issues and restructuring endeavors, GM announced that it was eliminating the Pontiac brand by the close of 2010 and was going to concentrate on four brands in North America: Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, and GMC.

The last Pontiac branded cars were assembled in December of 2009, with one final vehicle assembled in January, 2010. Pontiac dealers franchise agreements expired October 31, 2010.

The Pontiac marque was announced by General Motors in 1926 as the companion brand to GM's Oakland division, and shared the GM A model platform. It was named after the renowned Ottawa chief who had likewise given his name to the city of Pontiac, Michigan where the auto was produced. Within months of its announcement, Pontiac was outselling Oakland, which was basically a 1920s Chevrolet with a six cylinder motor installed. Available body styles incorporated a sedan with both two and four doors, Landau Coupe, with the Sport Cabrolet, Sport Phaeton, Sport Landau Sedan, and Sport Roadster. As a consequence of Pontiac's rising sales, compared to Oakland's declining sales, Pontiac became the only companion brand to survive its parent, with Oakland stopping production in 1932. It was additionally produced as knock-down kits at GM's fleeting Japanese factory at Osaka Assembly in Osaka, Japan from 1927-1941.

Pontiac created autos offering 40 hp (30 kW; 41 PS) 186.7 cu in (3.1 L) (3.25x3.75 in, 82.5x95mm) L-head straight 6-cylinder motors in the 1927 Pontiac Chief; At the time, it had the shortest stroke of any American auto in the industry. Within six months of its initial appearance at the 1926 New York Auto Show, the Pontiac sold 39,000 units, hitting 76,742 at twelve months.The following year, it turned into the top-selling six in the U.S., positioning seventh in general sales. By 1933, it had climbed to delivering the least costly autos available with straight eight-cylinder (inline eight) motors. This was accomplished by utilizing numerous parts from the 6-cylinder Chevrolet Master, for example, the same body, yet featujring an extensive chrome strip on the top and middle of the hood Pontiac called it the "Silver Streak".

In the late 1930s, Pontiac utilized the torpedo Buick body for one of its models, just before it was utilized by Chevrolet. This body style brought attention to the brand. A bizarre feature of the "torpedo" body exhibition vehicle, was that by pushing a button the front portion of the auto body opened displaying the motor and the auto's front seat interior. In 1937, the eight-cylinder featured a 122-inch (3,099 mm) wheelbase, while the six-cylinder featured a 117-inch (2,972 mm) wheelbase. In 1940, Pontiac presented another vehicle called the Pontiac Torpedo, and after two years, on 2 February 1942 a Pontiac became the last regular civilian car made in the United States amid World War II, as all auto factories changed over to military production.

For an extended time frame—prewar through the mid 1950s—the Pontiac was a calm, strong auto, yet not particularly powerful. It featured a flathead (side-valve) straight eight. Straight 8s were marginally less costly to manufacture than the increasingly popular V8s, yet they were heavier and longer. Furthermore, the long crankshaft experienced unreasonable flex, confining straight 8s to a generally low compression ratio with a humble redline. Be that as it may, in this application, cheap (yet quiet) flatheads were not a risk

Full Size

1910 Oakland Model K
1910 Oakland Model K
1926 Pontiac Model 6-27
1926 Pontiac Model 6-27
1927 Oakland
1927 Oakland
1931 Oakland Flathead V8
1931 Oakland Flathead V8

Deluxe - A-Body - 19331942

1935 Pontiac 3 window coupe
1935 Pontiac 3 window Deluxe coupe
1938 Pontiac Coupe
1938 Pontiac Deluxe Series 26 Coupe

Streamliner - B-Body - 1941-1951

1949 Pontiac Streamliner 8 Deluxe Sedan
1949 Pontiac Streamliner 8 Deluxe Sedan

Torpedo - A-Body - 1939-1948

1943 Pontiac Sedan - Sheriff's Department Pontiac. it looks like a 1943, although the license year is 1948 - Lincoln Center Car Show
1943 Pontiac Sedan
1943 Pontiac Sedan - Sheriff's Department Pontiac. it looks like a 1943, although the license year is 1948 - Lincoln Center Car Show
1943 Pontiac Sedan

Chieftan - A-Body - 19491958

1950 Pontiac
1950 Pontiac
1950 Pontiac
1950 Pontiac

Star Chief - A-Platform - 19541966

1957 Pontiac Star Chief
1957 Pontiac Star Chief

Safari - 19551957, 19581991 (as wagon trim), 19871989 (last Safari model)

Parisienne - 19591987

1960 Pontiac Parisienne
1960 Pontiac Parisienne

Ventura - B-Body - 19601977

Catalina - B-Platform - 19501981

Bonneville B-Platform - (19571981 and 19872005) - Ten Generations

Grand Ville - B-Body - 19711975

G8 - 20082010

2010 Pontiac G8 GXP
2010 Pontiac G8 GXP

Mid-Size

LeMans - (19621981)

Bonneville - (19821986)

6000 - 19821991

G6 - 20052010

Personal Luxury

1969 Pontiac Grand Prix
1969 Pontiac Grand Prix
1969 Pontiac Grand Prix
1969 Pontiac Grand Prix
2000 Pontiac Grand Prix GT
2000 Pontiac Grand Prix GT

Pony Cars

1972 Pontiac GTO
1972 Pontiac GTO

Sports Coupes

1973 Pontiac Firebird
1973 Pontiac Firebird
White 2017 Pontiac Firebird
White 2017 Pontiac Firebird


Compact

LeMans (19881993)

Grand Am - 19721975, 19771980, 19842005

Firefly - 19832003

G3 - 2002-present

Phoenix - 19771984

Sunbird - 19751994

Sunfire - 19942005

Tempest - 19611970, 19881991

Vibe - 20032010

Coupe Utility

1960 El Catalina
1960 El Catalina

Vans

Transport / Montana - 19972010

Concept

Bonneville Special - 1954

1954 Bonneville Special
1954 Bonneville Special


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Pontiac Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5