2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8

Underneath the blend of distinctly American and (borrowed) Bentley cues lies a surprising and immensely gratifying machine.

 

Chrysler Motor Cars Through the Years


A Pictorial Glimps of Chrysler Motor Cars Through the Years

FCA US LLC, otherwise called Fiat Chrysler or basically Chrysler, is the American subsidiary of Fiat Chrysler vehicles N.V., an Italian controlled car maker registered in the Netherlands with its headquarters in London, U.K. for tax purposes. FCA US is a member of the "Big Three" American car makers. FCA US is headquartered in Auburn Hills, Michigan and sells vehicles throughout the world under its Chrysler flagship brand, and also sells the Dodge, Jeep, and Ram Trucks. Additional major divisions include Mopar, its car parts and adornments division, and SRT, its performance car division.

Chrysler was first organized as the Chrysler Corporation in 1925. From 1998 to 2007, Chrysler and its subsidiaries were part of the German based DaimlerChrysler AG (now Daimler AG). On January 1, 2014, Fiat S.p.A reported an arrangement to buy the balance of Chrysler from the United Auto Workers retiree wellbeing trust. The arrangement was finished on January 21, 2014, making Chrysler Group a Fiat S.p.A. sbisidiary. In May 2014, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, NV was created up by combining Fiat S.p.A. into the organization. This was finished in August 2014. Chrysler Group LLC was a subsidiary until December 15, 2014, when the company was renamed FCA US LLC, in reflecting the Fiat-Chrysler merger

The company was founded by Walter Chrysler (1875–1940) on June 6, 1925, when the Maxwell Motor Company (est. 1904) was re-organized into the Chrysler Corporation

The Chrysler B-70 was announced in January 1924. It replaced the Maxwell-Chalmers models, the organization that Walter P. Chrysler had previously reorganized.

1923 Maxwell Chalmers
1923 Maxwell Chalmers
1926 Chrysler Model B70
1926 Chrysler Model B70


1930-1948

Within 10 years of organizing, Chrysler Corporation's innovation leadership had earned the name of Detroit's "engineering company." Chrysler's rundown of early car "firsts" included Floating Power (another strategy for mounting motors to isolate vibration), downdraft carburetors, replaceable oil filters and curved one-piece windshields. Chrysler entered a larger competition level with its luxuriously appointed Imperials. With a custom-manufactured body from LeBaron or Briggs, a 145-inch wheelbase, a 125-hordepower motor and a sticker price of $3,145, a typical early 1930s Imperial matched a Duesenberg in style, however cost just about a third.

1926 Chrysler Model 58
1926 Chrysler Model 58
1931 Chrysler
1931 Chrysler
Chrysler Airflow Sedan
Chrysler Airflow Sedan
1936 Chrysler
1936 Chrysler
1939 Chrysler
1939 Chrysler
1939 Chrysler Imperial Wagon
1939 Chrysler Imperial Wagon
1941 Chrysler
1941 Chrysler
1941 Chrysler
1941 Chrysler


Changing Times

1949-1954: The first sign of changing times at Chrysler accompanied the 1951 development, and enthusiastic approval, of the hemispheric-head V-8 motor. The forthcoming legendary HEMI® consolidated enhanced combustion, higher compression and less heat loss to make considerably horsepower than past V-8s. Not far behind was the completely automatic Powerflite transmission.

Chrysler then reaffirmed its engineering reputation by manufacturing a gas turbine engine This 27-year campaign to combine an aircraft turbine engine's smooth power and low maintenance to cars turned out to become a piece of the Chrysler brand's folklore.

1949 Chrysler deteriorating in a Stockton yard. December 7, 2013
1949 Chrysler Windsorr
1949 Chrysler Windsor 4 door
1949 Chrysler Windsor 4 door


The Forward Look

1955-1962: Exner refreshed Chrysler production automobile design with the smooth, sculptured Forward Look 1955 designs that altered the product line overnight. The Flagship Forward Look was the 1955 Chrysler 300, a striking vehicle that consolidated smooth styling with brawny HEMI power. The 300, was ostensibly the first muscle car, turned into a legend both on and off the race track and set new records all through the 1950s, including a 143-mph Daytona Beach performance. As the Fifties advanced, Chrysler vehicles started to grow unmistakable tailfins, apparently to enhance stability and handling above 70 mph. The 1957 Chrysler brand standard-bearer, the 300C, was outfitted with a standard 392-cubic-inch, 375-hp HEMI, a pair of four-barrel carburetors, a high-output cam, Torsion-Aire suspension along with the new Torqueflite transmission, making it the quickest, most powerful production auto manufactured in America that year and earning it the handle "beautiful brute."

The organization's engineering "firsts" from this period include the first "paded dashboard," the acclaimed Chrysler push-button transmission (which turned into a '50s icon), torsion-bar suspension, power steering and the first usable alternator (announced in 1960, it became so successful it became standard equipment only one year later).

1957 Chrysler 300 C
1957 Chrysler 300 C
1959 Chrysler Imperial in Starbucks in Lincoln Center
1959 Chrysler Imperial


Graceful Evolvement

1963-1970: Chrysler vehicles gracefully evolved through the '60s - tailfins vanished, large autos became more refined - and 1963 New Yorker advertising promised that there were "junior versions to compromise your investment." The 1963 Chrysler 300-J kept up the brand's style-in addition to speed image with standard cowhide interiors, Ram induction manifilds, and heavy duty torsion bars; a special-edition Pace Setter convertible began the Indianapolis 500.

By 1965, Chrysler saless had expanded 65 percent and the brand moved from eleventh to ninth place in national rankings. Models extended from the "affordable luxury" of the Newport vehicles (with no less than 376 trim and color choices), through the high-end New Yorker to the sporty Chrysler 300 with its 440-cubic-inch V-8.

1971-1979: One design highlight in Chrysler's fast evolving 1970s lineup was the Cordoba - a 115-inch wheelbase coupe labeled as "the new Chrysler's small car." With its Jaguar-style front end, formal roofline and stand-out rectangular taillamps, it turned in to one of the era's most noteworthy autos - alongside the TV advertisements featuring performer Ricardo Montalban lauding the virtues of its "rich Corinthian interior leather. Cordobas sold better than to all other Chrysler models combined, inspiring other new, "smallerr" Chrysler designs, such as the LeBaron Medallion coupe.

1980-1987: The "back to basics" era peaked with the 1984 preview of the minivan. Chrysler Corporation's most useful vehicle became its most popular and led to the revival of Chrysler Town and Country marque on an upmarket rendition. The design highlight for Chrysler amid this period was irrefutably the LeBaron convertible, which reacquainted the convertible to the U.S. market and enjoyed the market for nine years as it returned styling and fervor back to the brand.

1988-1998: In the late 1980s, fresh Chrysler leadership, resolved to return the brand to its engineering roots and excellence of design, chose to make an altogether new line of "Euro-Japanese-ethic" autos - and developed platform groups to reasonably and quickly get the job done. The new product logic was reflected in the development of concept autos such as the 1988 Portofino and the 1989 Millennium.

Chrysler's renaissance started decisively with the medium size 1993 Concorde sedan, which was immediately embraced by the full-size Chrysler LHS and 300M, the smaller Cirrus sedan, the Sebring convertible and Sebring sports coup and the next generation Town and Country minivan

2000: The new millennium introduced a full decade of design and innovation achievements for Chrysler, most outstandingly the dispatch of the notorious Chrysler 300C-the newest generation in a long family of champion 300s manufactured for excitement since 1955. When it was released in 2005, the sensational 300C caught the eyes of the automotive world. What's more, shone another focus on awesome American design.

However, the Chrysler 300C wasn't the only sparkling example of Chrysler innovative design. The presentation of the PT Cruiser melded modern amenities with a retro design romanticizing a time of hot rod Model A's. What's more, the decade was one of noteworthy reevaluation of the minivan, by the people who imagined it. With the family Town and Country flagship getting a large group of innovation and safety advancements to keep its status as the benchmark minivan into the new millennium years and then some.

2010+: Chrysler is the quintessential American brand as found in its prominent campaign promotions. In 2011, the Chrysler brand started the popular Imported from Detroit® campaign using a Super Bowl commercial. This fortified the brand and prompted to record-breaking sales.

Chrysler Group put almost a billion dollars into the Sterling Heights, Michigan fabricating plant for the manufacture of the All-New 2015 Chrysler 200. Engineered from the ground up, the 2015 Chrysler 200 was launched in January 2014. The vehicle highlights craftsmanship of the highest quality with a lovely designed exterior, an insightful, exquisitely made interior and an extraordinary driving experience, because of a section first nine-speed automatic transmission, along with 36 hwy mpg,


	The Chrysler Crossfire is a rear-wheel drive, 2-door sports car marketed by Chrysler as both coupé and roadster and was built for Chrysler by Karmann of Germany for model years 2004-2008.
Chrysler discontinued the Crossfire after the 2008 model year, as part of its restructuring plans
Chrysler Crossfire
2006 Chrysler 300 C
2006 Chrysler 300 C
2006 Chrysler 300 C
2006 Chrysler 300 C
2006 Chrysler 300 C
2006 Chrysler 300 C
Chrysler 300 Limo
Chrysler 300 Limo
2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8
2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8


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Chrysler Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5