2017 Chevrolet Colorado

Chevrolet has turned to sister company Cadillac to improve its Colorado pickup for the 2017 model year.

 

Chevrolet Trucks Through the Years


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Chevrolet Family

A Pictorial Glimpse of Chevrolet Trucks Through the Years

Chevrolet pickups began with a basic idea – a car chassis fitted with hand-fabricated beds to haul materials around a busy auto manufacturing plant. With a humble beginning, soon, millions of Chevrolet pickups became part the fabric of a quickly developing nation. Chevy trucks handled the toughest tasks on farms and fields, hauled timber and tools to the thriving suburbs areas and carried families and families into the wilds for very much earned get-aways.

The very first Chevy truck, the Four-Ninety Half-Ton rolled off productions lines December 2, 1916. Prior to that time, trucks were sold with just frontal sheet metal. The custom at the time was that the buyer provided their own wooden cargo bed, box or panel van depending upon their requirements. Small businesses were appearing all over America, and proprietors required successful transport for all their local products. At $595, the first Chevy half-ton filled the need. A second truck, the model "T," was likewise sold. However it was much a higher cost in order to deliver a higher weight capacity. Chevy trucks began catering to America's needs from the beginning.

Full Size Pickups

1916 Chevrolet Four Ninety Truck
1916 Chevrolet Four Ninety Truck
1927 Chevrolet Truck
1927 Chevrolet Truck
1931 Chevrolet Truck
1931 Chevrolet Truck
1936 Chevrolet Truck
1936 Chevrolet Truck
1940 Chevrolet Truck
1940 Chevrolet Truck

In the 1930s, factory built pickups soon replaced cowl chasis models. 1930s. Chevy's entrance into the new market got tough nicknames such as —"Cast Iron Wonder" and "Stovebolt." These new half-ton pickups contended with an assortment of auto companies including Mack, Reo, Studebacker, and International.

The Great Depression, obviously, proved troublesome for the American automobile industry. Nonetheless, when the economy started to recuperate, Chevrolet looked to restore the truck market and plan new, innovative trucks. In 1937, Chevy presented a new, streamlined design powered by a 78 hp engine. During a 10,000-mile monitored trip, the 1937 half-ton pickup hauled a 1,060 lb. load and accomplished a noteworthy 20.74 miles for every gallon. Proficiency in outline was met by fuel productivity, even in the '30s.

Chevrolet AK Series Pickup truck - 1941-1947

The Chevrolet AK Series pickup truck was a light duty unit sold under the Chevrolet brand. production began in 1941 and continued until 1947. It utilized the GM A platform, also shared with Chevrolet Deluxe autos. The AK series was likewise marked and sold at GMC dealers, with the main visual distinction was that the Chevrolet featured vertical grill bars, while the GMC contained horizontal bars. The 1941-45 GMC models were marketed as C-Series and turned into the E-Series in 1946 and 1947 model years (CC-Series/EC-Series for the conventional cab versions and CF-Series/EF-Series for the COE ones).

1941 Chevrolet Truck
1941 Chevrolet Truck
1942 Chevrolet Cab Over
1942 Chevrolet Cab Over
1943 Chevrolet Truck
1943 Chevrolet Truck
1947 Chevrolet Truck
1947 Chevrolet Truck (Early 1947)

The AK series was appearance split from past Chevrolet vehicles where the passenger autos and pickup trucks shared a common look, as showed in the Chevrolet Master truck. There was an all new appearance in The Chevrolet Deluxe when it was presented in 1941, and shared quite a bit of its mechanicals with the third generation Suburban.

Advanced Design - 1947-1955

Chevrolet's first major redesign after World War II, the Advance-Design series was promoted as a bigger, stronger, and sleeker design in contrast with the prior AK Series. The became available, June 28, 1947, these trucks were sold with minor changes throughout the years until the Task Force Series trucks were announced March 25, 1955 replacing the dated Advance-Design model.

A similar basic design family was utilized for the majority of its trucks including the canopy express, Suburban, panel trucks, and cab overs. The cab overs utilized similar cab configurations and similar grille however utilized a shorter and taller hood along with different fenders. The Cab Over hood and fenders required a different cowl which makes the Cab Over and normal truck cabs incompatible with each other while all truck cabs of all weights are interchangeable.

Chevrolet trucks were the number one selling truck in the U.S. from 1947 until 1955, with rebranded renditions sold at GMC dealerships

While General Motors utilized this front end sheet metal, and to a lesser degree the cab, on the majority of its trucks aside from the Cab Overs, there are three principle sizes of this vehicle the half, three-quarter, and full ton versions in short and long wheelbase.

After WWII, Chevy announced totally redesigned trucks. Drivers desired a more comfortable ride, offering better visibility and a wider box. The Advanced-Design Half-Ton Truck delivered on every one of those requests. Created from 1947 through 1953, the Advanced-Design assumed an overwhelming role in Chevrolet's prosperity during the first years after the War. The sales ratio of autos to trucks dropped to 2.5:1, and Chevy attained 2 million sales (a first for any American auto producer) in 1950.

1950s Chevrolet Pickup
1950s Chevrolet Pickup
1950s Chevrolet Pickup
1950s Chevrolet Pickup
1950s Chevrolet Pickup
1950s Chevrolet Pickup
1950s Chevrolet Pickup
1950s Chevrolet Pickup


Differences

  • 1947 - Gasoline tank filler neck on moved to passenger side of bed. No door vent windows. Hood side emblems read as "Chevrolet" with "Thriftmaster" or "Loadmaster" underneath. Serial numbers: EP ½ ton, ER ¾ ton, and ES 1 ton. Radios were initially available in Chevrolet trucks as an optional "in dash" on the "Advancedl Design" body style.
  • 1948 - Manual transmission shifter moved to column rather than floor. Serial numbers codes were: FP ½ ton, FR ¾ ton, and FS 1 ton.
  • Mid 1949 - Gasoline tank moved upright behind seat in cab; filler neck rearward of passenger door handle. More New serial number codes as: GP ½ ton, GR ¾ ton, and GS 1 ton.
  • Late 1949 - Hood side symbols became numbers that assign cargo capacity as: 3100 - ½ ton, 3600 - ¾ ton, 3800 - 1 ton. Serial number codes continue as before as on mid 1949.
  • 1950 - Telescopic shock absorbers suppplant lever-activity style. Final year for driver side cowl vent, its handle became flat steel, not maroon knob as in earlier years. New serial number codes as: HP ½ ton, HR ¾ ton, and HS 1 ton.
  • 1951 - Vent windows now in doors. Mid-year change from 9-board per bed to 8 boards in the bed. Final year for 80 MPH speedometer, chrome knobs on window handles, and chrome wiper knob. More New serial number codes as: JP ½ ton, JR ¾ ton, and JS 1 ton.
  • 1952 - New pushbutton door handles rather than the past turn down style. Speedometer now shows 90 mph and dashboard trim is painted rather than chrome. Mid-year, Chevrolet quits utilizing the 3100-6400 labels on the hood and changes to maroon wiper and window knobs. More New serial number codes as: KP ½ ton, KR ¾ ton, and KS 1 ton.
  • 1953 - Last year for the 216 in³ inline-six. Hood side emblems now just read 3100, 3600, 3800, 4400, or 6400 in expanded print. Door post ID plate becomes blue with silver letters (past models utilized dark with silver letters). Final year for wooden blocks being used for bed supports. More new serial number codes as: H ½ ton, J ¾ ton, and L 1 ton.
  • 1954 - Only year for noteworthy design changes. Windshield now a curved one-piece glass without vertical partitioning strip. New steering wheel. Redesigned dashboard. Bed cargo rails, now horizontal. Tail lights round rather than rectangular. Grille changed from five flat supports to crossbar outline regularly referred to as a "bull nose" grille, like Dodge truck grille. Engine becomes 235 in³ straight-6. Serial number codes unaltered from 1953. First time for automatic Hydramatic transmission as an available option.
  • 1955 First Series - Identical to the 1954 model year, with the exception of redesigned emblems on the hood-sides, open driveshaft set up of encased torque tube. Serial number codes unaltered from 1953 and 1954.

Task Force - 1955-1960

The 1955 Chevrolet Task Force Pickup shares the Bel Air's styling, and offers a new V8 engine. This was the start of new era in pickup trucks, a period when utility vehicles equally fit on a job site or on a gentleman's driveway. Well appointed trucks such as like the El Camino, Avalanch, and Silverado owe their existence to 1955's Cameo Carrier.

Early 1955 Chevrolet Pickup
Early 1955 Chevrolet Pickup
1955 Chevrolet Pickup
1955 Chevrolet Pickup
1957 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup
1957 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup
1958 Chevrolet Apache 31 Cameo Fleetside Pickup
1958 Chevrolet Apache 31 Cameo Fleetside Pickup


The Advance-Design trucks was the styling inspiration for both the Chevrolet HHR and the Chevrolet SSR.

Chevy C/K Designation - 1960-1999

From 1960 until 1998, the C/K was the Chevrolet and GMC' full-size pickup truck line in the United States, and from 1965 to 1999 in Canada, 1964 to 2001 in Brazil, and 1975 to 1982 in Chile. The very first Chevrolet pickup was produced in 1924, however in-house designes were not produced until 1930. "C" indicated two-wheel drive and "K" showed four-wheel drive. In 1999, the dated C/K light-duty pickup truck was supplanted with the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra badges in the US and Canada, and in Brazil in 2001; the Chevy Silverado HD and GMC Sierra HD heavy-duty pickups soon followed. Until this date, the names Silverado and Sierra were utilized to distinguish the trim level of the C/K pickup trucks.

1960 Chevrolet Apache Pickup
1960 Chevrolet Apache Pickup
1961 Chevrolet Fleetside Pickup
1961 Chevrolet Fleetside Pickup
1964 Chevrolet Pickup
1964 Chevrolet Pickup
1964 Chevrolet Pickup
1964 Chevrolet Pickup
1965 Chevrolet Pickup
1965 Chevrolet Pickup
1965 Chevrolet Pickup
1965 Chevrolet Pickup


The 1960 model year presented another body style of light get truck that included numerous firsts. Most significanr of these were a drop-center ladder frame, permitting the cab to sit lower, while independent front suspension, provided a nearly auto like ride in a truck. Additionally new for 1960 was a new designation for GM trucks. Gone were the 3100, 3200, and 3600 labels for short 1/2, long 1/2 and 3/4-ton models. Rather, a new designation was applied to 10, 20, and 30 for 1/2, 3/4, and 1-ton models. Beginning in 1957, four wheel drive trucks could be ordered from the factory, and the new class scheme made this known. A C (conventional) letter in front of the series number is two-wheel rear drive while a K means four-wheel drive.

Second generation C/K Generation, 19671972

A new, more advanced look came in 1967, alongside another epithet: "Action Line". It was with this C/K truck line revision that General Motors started to add comfort sand convenience items to a vehicle line that had beforehand been designed only for work. Upgraded styling highlights for the 1967 Chevy Pickup trucks accompanied new body sheet metal that battles rust. The greater part of 10 and 20 arrangement Chevrolet trucks from 1967 to 1972 were worked with a coil spring and trailing arm rear suspension, which significantly enhanced the ride over conventional leaf springs. Notwithstanding, the leaf spring back suspension was still available for those trucks, and standard on 30 series Chevy trucks. The front suspension on all trucks featured independent front suspension offering coil springs. GMC models were with leaf springs standard and coil springs an option; every four-wheel drive models (both Chevrolet and GMC) had leaf springs at both axles. 1967 was the only year to feature the "small back window" (RPO A10 offered a large back window as a factory option. The standard drivetrain was a three-speed manual transmission along with one of two engines; a 250 in3 straight six or a 283 cu in (4.6 L) V8. Optional transmissions were the Powerglide and the Turbo-Hydramatic 350 and 400 and the four speed manual version. The 292 six and the 327 cubic inch V8 were optional engines. The 1/2 ton trucks were equipped with a 6 x 5.5–inch bolt pattern, while the 3/4 and 1 ton trucks were equipped with an 8 x 6.5–inch bolt pattern.

1967 Chevrolet Pickup
1967 Chevrolet Pickup
1971 Chevrolet Pickup
1971 Chevrolet Pickup
1971 Chevrolet Pickup
1971 Chevrolet Pickup
1996 Chevrolet Silverado C/K Pickup
1996 Chevrolet Silverado C/K Pickup


The most visible change in separating a 1968 from a 1967 was the inclusion of side-marker reflectors on all fenders. Likewise, the little back window cab was not available. The GMC grille was redesigned, with the letters "GMC" gone from the flat crossbar. Another enhancement was the Custom Comfort and Convenience interior package included between the Standard cab and CST cab choices. Chevrolet celebrated 50 years of truck manufacturing in 1968, and to celebrate, they released a 50th Anniversary package, which included an exclusive white-gold-white paint scheme. Likewise in 1968, the Longhorn version debuted on 3/4 ton pickup trucks. Including a 133-inch wheelbase indistinguishable from the one-ton trucks, it added an additional 6 inches to the bed. Longhorns, curiously, were 2wd just; no factory Longhorn 4x4 was ever manufactured.

Introduced in 1999, the Chevrolet Silverado, and its mechanically indistinguishable cousin, the GMC Sierra, are a full-size heavy duty pickup trucks series made by General Motors and are the successor to the long-running Chevrolet C/K model line. The Silverado name was obtained from a trim level utilized previously on the Chevrolet C/K pickup from 1975 through 1998. General Motors continues to build a GMC-badged variation of the Chevrolet full-size pickup using the GMC Sierra name, initially utilized in 1987 as a variation of the GMT400 platform truck line.

First Generation Silverado (1999–2007)

2003 Chevrolet Silverado Pickup
2003 Chevrolet Silverado Pickup
2003 Chevrolet Silverado Pickup
2003 Chevrolet Silverado Pickup
2006 Chevrolet 2500
2006 Chevrolet 2500
2010 Chevrolet Silverado
2010 Chevrolet Silverado
2012 Chevrolet Silverado
2012 Chevrolet Silverado
2015 Chevrolet Silverado
2015 Chevrolet Silverado
2017 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD
2017 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD


The GMT800 Silverado-Sierra 1500 and 2500 light duty pickup trucks were announced in 1998 as 1999 models. The "classict" light-duty GMT400 C/K trucks continued production during that first year alongside the new model line, and the Heavy-Duty GMT400 pickup trucks (alongside the GMT400 SUVs) were continued through the year 2000, with the new GMT800 Silverado/Sierra HD being presented. A small redesign was presented in 2002, bringing slight design changes along with a sound and HVAC controls upgrade. The 2007 production models utilized the name "classic" to mean the distinction between the first and second generation trucks

Sport Utility Pickups

SSR - 2003-2006

The SSR (Super Sport Roadster), a retractable hardtop convertible pickup truck was produced between 2003 and 2006.

Both the 2003 and 2004 models featured the GM Vortec 5300 engine, a 5.3 liter 300 hp V8. It reached 0-60 mph in 7.7 seconds and 15.9 s/86.4 mph in the quarter mile. The 2005 SSR utilized the 390 hp LS2 V8 also installed in the C6 Corvette and Pontiac GTO, and there was also a six-speed Tremec manual transmission option. The 2006 model year, LS2 engine had minor changes that helped boost output to 395 hp (with an automatic transmission) and 400 hp (with manual transmission), respectively. GM badges were also added to the vehicle.

Compact Pickups

LUV - 1972-1980

The LUV and the later LUV D-Max are light pickup trucks were designed and produced by Isuzu and sold in the Americas by Chevrolet from 1972 to 1982. The trucks, created during four successive generations, are rebadged variations of the Isuzu Faster and Isuzu D-Max. LUV is an acronym for "light utility vehicle".

S-10 - 1982-2004

The compact S-10 was the first pickup truck created by one of the big three American auto makers. Introduced in 1982, the GMC adaptation was labeled the S-15 and later became the GMC Sonoma. A high performance variant was produced in 1991 with the name of GMC Syclone. The pickup was sold as the Hombre by Isuzu from 1996 through 2000, although only in North America. There was additionally a SUV model, the Chevrolet S-10 Blazer/GMC S-15 Jimmy. An electric model was leased as a fleet vehicle during 1997 and 1998. Together, these pickups are regularly called to as the S-series. The S-series was replaced by the Chevrolet Colorado and the GMC Canyon

Colorado - 2003 - present

2012 Chevrolet Colorado
2012 Chevrolet Colorado


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Chevrolet Trucks Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5