AMC Motor Cars Through the Years


A Pictorial Glimpse of AMC Motor Cars - 1954-1982

American Motors Corporation (AMC) was created by the merger of Nash-Kelvinator and Hudson in 1954. At the time, it was the biggest corporate merger in U.S. history.

AMC competed with the Big Three, Ford, GM and Chrysler in the U.S. — with its small autos including the American. Gremlin, Pacer and Rambler; muscle autos including the AMX, Marlin, and Javelin, and 4-wheel-drive variations including the Concord and Eagle.

The organization was known as "a small organization sufficiently deft to expand into special segments of the market ignored by the giants, and was well known for the design expertise of chief stylist, Dick Teague, who "made do with a much more tightly spending budget than his counterparts at Detroit's Big Three" yet "had a skill for benefitting as much as possible from his employer's' investment."

After times of irregular however unsustained achievement, Renault gained a major interest AMC in 1979 — and the organization was at subsequently acquired by by Chrysler. At its 1987 downfall, The New York Times said AMC was "never an organization with the power or the cost structure to contend confidently at home or abroad."

The merger of Nash-Kelvinator and Hudson in 1954, and the creation of American Motors, was driven by George W. Artisan to receive advantages from the strengths of the two firms to take on the much bigger "Big Three" automakers (General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler).

Inside a year, George W. Romney, future Michigan governor, assumed control, reorganizing the company and focusing the future of AMC' on new line of small cars. By the end of 1957 the Nash and Hudson brands were totally eliminated. At first, organization struggled, however Rambler sales took off. A Rambler took the top spot in the 1959 Mobil Economy Run and became the third most well known vehicle brand in the United States by 1960, behind Ford and Chevrolet. After their first two model years (1963 and 1964) of only manufacturing compact autos, AMC began focusing bigger and autos with more profit like the Ambassador line from the negative perception of the Rambler's economy auto image. In the face of weakening money related and showcase positions, Roy D. Chapin, Jr., assumed responsibility to rejuvenate the organization, and designer Richard A. Teague economized by creating several new vehicles from common stampings. While costs and expenses were cut, new, more sporty autos were presented, and from 1968 AMC was known for the AMX and Javelin muscle cars.

In 1970, AMC bought Kaiser's Jeep utility vehicle operations to complement its current passenger vehicle business. In the early 1970s, the organization moved towards all-new compact designs based upon the Hornet, including the Gremlin and the Hornet itself. Other new models in the 1970s were the Matador and Pacer. With an end goal to make a more proficient cost structure, in the 1979 model year, AMC killed the Matador line and afterward in the 1980 model year, dispensed with the Pacer, concentrating only on its Hornet-based autos and the line of Jeeps. While the new lines of the late 1970s, for example, the Spirit and Concord, were variants of the Hornet platform, the organization proceeded with existing design innovations: the 4-wheel-drive AMC Eagle, presented in 1979, was one of the first real crossovers

Full Size Vehicles

1956 Nash Ambassador
1956 Nash Ambassador
1964 AMC Ambassador
1964 AMC Ambassador

Eagle

The Eagle name was acquired from the AMC Eagle, the remains of American Motors' entirely U.S.- composed vehicles. The Jeep/Eagle division of Chrysler Corporation was shaped after Chrysler's 1987 acquisition of American Motors. The vehicles were primarily sold by AMC dealers along with Jeep vehicles. The Eagle was discontinued in 1997

AMC Eagle Wagon
AMC Eagle Wagon

Mid Size Vehicles

Rambler

1958 Nash Rambler
1958 Nash Rambler
1964 Rambler American
1964 Rambler American
1965 Rambler American
1965 Rambler American

Matador

1976 AMC Matador Coupe
1976 AMC Matador Coupe

Compact Vehicles

Metropolitan

1955 Nash Metropolitan
1955 Nash Metropolitan

Recommended Reading

AMC Vehicles Through the Yeara Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5