GMC Vehicles Through the Years


General Motors was established by William C. Durant in 1908, as a holding company for Buick. GM obtained the Rapid Motor Vehicle Company of Pontiac, Michigan in 1909, framing the foundation of GMC Trucks. (Rapid was founded in 1901, by Max Grabowsky. The organization developed some of the earliest trucks ever manufactured, and used single-cylinder motors.) The Reliance Motor Car Company (another independent truck maker) was also acquired by GM that same year. In 1911, Rapid and Reliance were merged, and in 1912 the "GMC Truck" marque was first displayed vehicles at the New York International Auto Show. Somewhere in the range of 22,000 trucks were manufactured that year, however GMC's contribution to those numbers was only 372 units. GMC, later became distinct division brand inside the partnership, marking trucks and coaches..

GMC had three assembling plants in Oakland California, Pontiac, Michigan, and Saint Louis, Missouri.

A GMC Truck crossed the nation from Seattle to New York City in 1916 in thirty days, and a GMC 2 ton truck was driven from New York City to San Francisco in 1916 in five days and 30 minutes. Amid the Second World War, GMC created 600,000 trucks to be used by the United States Armed Forces.

GM acquired a controlling interest in Yellow Coach in 1925, a bus maker situated in Chicago, Illinois which was established by John D. Hertz. After acquiring the balance in 1943, it was renamed the GM Truck and Coach Division. The Division produced interurban coaches until 1980. In May 1987, Transit bus production ended. The Canadian plant (in London, Ontario) created buses from 1962 until July 1987. In the late 1970s, GM withdrew from the bus and coach market on account of expanded rivalry in the late 1980s. RTS model rights were sold to Transportation Manufacturing Corporation, and Motor Coach Industries of Canada bought the Classic design. In 1998, GMC's official marking on vehicles was abbreviated from "GMC Truck" to just "GMC".

In 2002, GMC published a book called, GMC: The First 100 Years, a total history of the organization.

GMC presently makes SUVs, pickup trucks, vans, and light and medium duty trucks. Previously, GMC also made fire trucks, ambulances, heavy duty trucks, military vehicles, transit buses and motorhomes.

1912 GMC Model V Panel
1912 GMC Model V Panel
1916 GMC Truck
1916 GMC Truck


1920-1921   - New "K" models were presented with 3/4 to 5-tons capacities. They had Northway motors.

1920 GMC Truck
1920 GMC Truck
1925 GMC Truck
1925 GMC Truck


1927   - GMC showed new "T" series vehicles. The 1/2-ton Panel Express and the Screen Side Express were manufactured by the Oakland Motor Car Co. (later it became Pontiac Motor Division. of GM). Pontiac engines were utilized in GMC pickups and light trucks from 1927 through 1932. 1 and 2-ton vehicles were driven by more powerful and proficient Buick 6 chamber valve-in-head motors

1927 GMC Truck
1927 GMC Truck


1931   - Chevrolet taxis and front sheet metal were utilized on GMC light and medium models interestingly.

1931 GMC Truck
1931 GMC Truck
1937 GMC Suburban
1937 GMC Suburban


1939   - New "A" arrangement models were announced, covering the full scope of sizes.

1939 GMC Pickup
1939 GMC Pickup
1940 GMC Panel
1940 GMC Panel


AK Series - 1941-1947

The GMC AK Series light duty truck was first in 1941 until 1947. It utilized the GM A platform which was also marked and sold at Chevrolet dealers, with the essential visual contrast being the Gmc had horizontal grill bars while the Chevrolet had vertical grill bars. The 1941-45 GMC models were marketed as C-Series and E-Series for the 1946 and 1947 model years.

1941 GMC Pickup
1941 GMC Pickup
1942 GMC Pickup
1942 GMC Pickup
1942 GMC Truck
1942 GMC Truck
1943 GMC Truck
1943 GMC Truck
1946 GMC COE Truck
1946 GMC COE Truck
1947 GMC Pickup
1947 GMC Pickup
1949 GMC Suburban
1949 GMC Suburban
1950 GMC Pickup
1950 GMC Pickup
1951 GMC Suburban
1951 GMC Suburban
1951 GMC Pickup
1951 GMC Pickup


Blue Chip Series - 1955-1959

Pontiac Powered, similar to the Chevrolet Task-Force trucks

1957 GMC Pickup
1957 GMC Pickup


C and K Series - 1960-1995

Half–, three-quarter– and one-ton trucks, featuring Sierra, Sierra Grande, High Sierra, and Sierra Classic trim lines

1960 GMC Pickup
1960 GMC Pickup
1970 GMC Pickup
1970 GMC Pickup
1980 GMC Jimmy
1980 GMC Jimmy


Sierra - 1996 - Present

GMC version of Chevrolet Silverado medium- and heavy-duty pickup

1996 GMC Sierra 2500 Pickup
1996 GMC Sierra 2500 Pickup
2011 GMC Yukon Hybrid
2011 GMC Yukon Hybrid
2012 GMC Denali
2012 GMC Denali
2017 GMC Sierra Denali 2500 HD
2017 GMC Sierra Denali 2500 HD


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GMC Vehicles Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5